65

I have the following...

enum NubDirection {
  OUTWARD,
  INWARD
}
...
direction : NubDirection;
...
let index = Math.floor(Math.random() * 2) + 1;
nub.direction = NubDirection[index];

But this throws

error TS2322: Type 'string' is not assignable to type 'NubDirection'.

5
  • 1
    what is nub, missing information. Sep 10, 2016 at 15:26
  • Should be obvious but I will add it...
    – Jackie
    Sep 10, 2016 at 15:27
  • 1
    it is now, wasn't before the first edit Sep 10, 2016 at 15:27
  • Ok sorry about that typo
    – Jackie
    Sep 10, 2016 at 15:32
  • 1
    This would work, definitely a dirty fix - Object.keys(NubDirection).indexOf(NubDirection[index]) - (Object.keys(NubDirection).length / 2)
    – asyncwait
    Jun 14, 2021 at 18:29

7 Answers 7

52

If you have string enum like so:

export enum LookingForEnum {
    Romantic = 'Romantic relationship',
    Casual = 'Casual relationship',
    Friends = 'Friends',
    Fun = 'Fun things to do!'
}

Then

 const index: number = Object.keys(LookingForEnum).indexOf('Casual'); // 1
3
  • What about if you only have the string "Casual relationship", could you still find the index? Oct 26, 2020 at 22:04
  • 10
    It turns out you can do Object.values(LookingForEnum).indexOf('Casual relationship') Oct 27, 2020 at 19:07
  • Gotta love the beauty of typescript sarcastic grin.
    – Trace
    Mar 3, 2022 at 19:34
34

When you declare that something is of type NubDirection then it's actually a number:

var a = NubDirection.INWARD;
console.log(a === 1); // true

When you access the enum using the ordinal you get back a string and not a number and because of that you can not assign it to something that was declared as NubDirection.

You can do:

nub.direction = NubDirection[NubDirection[index]];

The reason for this is that there's no such thing as enum in javascript, and the way typescript imitates enums is by doing this when compiling it to js:

var NubDirection;
(function (NubDirection) {
    NubDirection[NubDirection["OUTWARD"] = 0] = "OUTWARD";
    NubDirection[NubDirection["INWARD"] = 1] = "INWARD";
})(NubDirection || (NubDirection = {}));

So you end up with this object:

NubDirection[0] = "OUTWARD";
NubDirection[1] = "INWARD";
NubDirection["OUTWARD"] = 0;
NubDirection["INWARD"] = 1;
6
  • @AntonPegov what doesn't work? Seems the same to me Jun 26, 2019 at 6:59
  • 1
    ErrorCode[Object.keys(ErrorCode)[1]] - works, ErrorCode[ErrorCode[1]] - doesn't work Jun 28, 2019 at 22:01
  • @AntonPegov I'm not sure what is this ErrorCode object you use, but using the example of the OP, this: NubDirection[NubDirection[1]] works. Jun 29, 2019 at 18:34
  • Oh, yes, but if you set INWARD = 'INWARD' in enum, it is stops work. Strange behavior... Jul 1, 2019 at 11:34
  • @AntonPegov Oh, yeah, enums with string values work completely different. Compare the js output of the two and see what the compiler is doing there. Jul 1, 2019 at 11:39
23

Use this:

Object.values(NubDirection)[index]
1
  • I just wrote a pipe for my purposes using this method. It takes in the enum object and then expects an index and returns the string value. import { Pipe, PipeTransform } from '@angular/core'; @Pipe({ name: 'valueByOrdinal', }) export class ValueByOrdinalPipe implements PipeTransform { transform(type: any, index): unknown { return Object.values(type)[index]; } }
    – BondAddict
    Mar 3, 2023 at 20:31
15

you may use:

export enum SpaceCargoShipNames {
  Gnat = 'Gnat',
  Orilla = 'Orilla',
  Ambassador = 'Ambassador',
  CarnarvonBay = 'Carnarvon Bay'
}

and then:

let max = Object.keys(SpaceCargoShipNames).length;  //items count
let n = Math.round(Math.random() * max);            //random index
let v = Object.values(SpaceCargoShipNames)[n];      //item
console.log(max, n, v, v.valueOf());                
6

None of the answers above quite did it for me. What you can do is something like:

// Do whatever math operation with an index you wish...
...

// Get the the enum string value:
const nextStringedEnum: string = Object.values(NubDirection)[nextIndex];

// Get the typed enum from the string value:
const nextIndex: NubDirection = Object.values(NubDirection).indexOf(nextStringedEnum);
2

You can also access like this.

enum values

export enum TEST_ENUM {
 T1 = "This is test 1"
 T2 = "This is test 2"
}

Component

var a: string = "T1";
let b = (TEST_ENUM as any)[a];

console.log("val b: ", b);     // This is test 1

or

let c = Object.keys(TEST_ENUM).indexOf(a);

console.log("val c: ", c);     // This is test 1
2
  • I'd change type of a from string to keyof typeof TEST_ENUM. And I'm not really understand idea of acessing enum via string instead of just TEST_ENUM.T1
    – Tomas
    Nov 18, 2022 at 9:34
  • @Tomas You're right I'm just showing this way would also work.
    – Dave Lee
    Nov 21, 2022 at 15:15
0

Because of confusion with string enums and their blurry nature and issues with ordinal accessing, I prefer to rather use numerical enums and pretend them to be string ones:

enum StringEnum {
    STRING_ONE = 0,
    STRING_TWO
}

console.log(StringEnum.STRING_ONE)
console.log(StringEnum[StringEnum.STRING_ONE])

this will give you

[LOG]: 0 
[LOG]: "STRING_ONE" 

And you can have best of both worlds: significant string labeling that is easy accessible without using any indexOf search and explicit numerical values.

Just by previewing compilation output it's obvious, that usage of numerical enums is more reach in options:

enum StringEnum {
    STRING_ONE = 'string1',
    STRING_TWO = 'string2'
}

gives

"use strict";
var StringEnum;
(function (StringEnum) {
    StringEnum["STRING_ONE"] = "string1";
    StringEnum["STRING_TWO"] = "string2";
})(StringEnum || (StringEnum = {}));

while

enum StringEnum {
    STRING_ONE = 0,
    STRING_TWO
}

immediately enables both possibilities:

"use strict";
var StringEnum;
(function (StringEnum) {
    StringEnum[StringEnum["STRING_ONE"] = 0] = "STRING_ONE";
    StringEnum[StringEnum["STRING_TWO"] = 1] = "STRING_TWO";
})(StringEnum || (StringEnum = {}));

If you need even further explicit string mapping, i.e. whole user prompts or so, I;m usually hanlding this by additional mapping table:

enum StringEnum {
    STRING_ONE = 0,
    STRING_TWO
}

export type EnumMapper = {
    someExtendedText: string,
    ENUM_KEY: keyof typeof StringEnum
}

const mapper: EnumMapper[] = [
    {someExtendedText: 'Some long bla bla bla', ENUM_KEY: "STRING_ONE"},
    {someExtendedText: 'Some other long bla bla', ENUM_KEY: "STRING_TWO"}
]

let desriptionForEnumOne = mapper[StringEnum.STRING_ONE].someExtendedText;

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