I want to show some images like this examplealt text

The fill color is decided by a field in the data base with the color in hex (ex:ClassX -> Color: #66FFFF). Now, I want to show data above a fill with the selected color (like in the image above) but i need to know if the color is dark or light so i know if the words should be in white or black. Is there a way? tks

15 Answers 15

up vote 222 down vote accepted

Building on my answer to a similar question.

You need to break the hex code into 3 pieces to get the individual red, green, and blue intensities. Each 2 digits of the code represent a value in hexadecimal (base-16) notation. I won't get into the details of the conversion here, they're easy to look up.

Once you have the intensities for the individual colors, you can determine the overall intensity of the color and choose the corresponding text.

if (red*0.299 + green*0.587 + blue*0.114) > 186 use #000000 else use #ffffff


Edit: The above is simple and works reasonably well, and seems to have good acceptance here at StackOverflow. However, one of the comments below shows it can lead to non-compliance with W3C guidelines in some circumstances. Herewith I derive a modified form that always chooses the highest contrast based on the guidelines.

The formula given for contrast in the W3C Recommendations is (L1 + 0.05) / (L2 + 0.05), where L1 is the luminance of the lightest color and L2 is the luminance of the darkest on a scale of 0.0-1.0. The luminance of black is 0.0 and white is 1.0, so substituting those values lets you determine the one with the highest contrast. If the contrast for black is greater than the contrast for white, use black, otherwise use white. Given the luminance of the color you're testing as L the test becomes:

if (L + 0.05) / (0.0 + 0.05) > (1.0 + 0.05) / (L + 0.05) use #000000 else use #ffffff

This simplifies down algebraically to:

if L > sqrt(1.05 * 0.05) - 0.05

Or approximately:

if L > 0.179 use #000000 else use #ffffff

The only thing left is to compute L. That formula is also given in the guidelines and it looks like the conversion from sRGB to linear RGB followed by the ITU-R recommendation BT.709 for luminance.

for each c in r,g,b:
    c = c / 255.0
    if c <= 0.03928 then c = c/12.92 else c = ((c+0.055)/1.055) ^ 2.4
L = 0.2126 * r + 0.7152 * g + 0.0722 * b
  • 6
    Way better answer than mine – DJ Quimby Oct 15 '10 at 14:20
  • 2
    Tks Mark. Tryed a few changes: calculated red green and blue by the first digit only (less precise but is the digit with more weight) and instead of 186 used 9. works a little bit better for me, specially with greens. – DJPB Oct 15 '10 at 16:26
  • 1
    This formula is wrong, by a lot. To take one example, it gives the yellow #D6B508 a value of 171, hence a white contrast. The contrast should be black, however (confirmed here: webaim.org/resources/contrastchecker) – McGarnagle Jul 17 '14 at 20:36
  • 24
    A quick example using the formula above. – ALx May 7 '15 at 13:01
  • 2
    Here's another demo comparing the two formulas given in this answer. Using the color picker (in recent Firefox or Chrome) you can check the contrast against any color. – chetstone May 13 '16 at 5:58

How about this (JavaScript code)?

/**
 * Get color (black/white) depending on bgColor so it would be clearly seen.
 * @param bgColor
 * @returns {string}
 */
getColorByBgColor(bgColor) {
    if (!bgColor) { return ''; }
    return (parseInt(bgColor.replace('#', ''), 16) > 0xffffff / 2) ? '#000' : '#fff';
}
  • This works most of the time but there are cases like i.imgur.com/3pOUDe5.jpg that look weird, background color is actually rgb(6, 247, 241); – madprops Dec 30 '16 at 11:54
  • I appreciate this is a relatively cheap way to perform a contrast calculation in cases where you haven't already converted the colour to rgb values (not that that is too difficult, just extra math steps) – frumbert Mar 27 '17 at 5:03

I take no credit for this code as it's not mine, but I leave it here for others to find quickly in the future:

Based on Mark Ransoms answer, here's a code snippet for the simple version:

function pickTextColorBasedOnBgColorSimple(bgColor, lightColor, darkColor) {
  var color = (bgColor.charAt(0) === '#') ? bgColor.substring(1, 7) : bgColor;
  var r = parseInt(color.substring(0, 2), 16); // hexToR
  var g = parseInt(color.substring(2, 4), 16); // hexToG
  var b = parseInt(color.substring(4, 6), 16); // hexToB
  return (((r * 0.299) + (g * 0.587) + (b * 0.114)) > 186) ?
    darkColor : lightColor;
}

and here's the code snippet for the advanced version:

function pickTextColorBasedOnBgColorAdvanced(bgColor, lightColor, darkColor) {
  var color = (bgColor.charAt(0) === '#') ? bgColor.substring(1, 7) : bgColor;
  var r = parseInt(color.substring(0, 2), 16); // hexToR
  var g = parseInt(color.substring(2, 4), 16); // hexToG
  var b = parseInt(color.substring(4, 6), 16); // hexToB
  var uicolors = [r / 255, g / 255, b / 255];
  var c = uicolors.map((col) => {
    if (col <= 0.03928) {
      return col / 12.92;
    }
    return Math.pow((col + 0.055) / 1.055, 2.4);
  });
  var L = (0.2126 * c[0]) + (0.7152 * c[1]) + (0.0722 * c[2]);
  return (L > 0.179) ? darkColor : lightColor;
}

To use them just call:

var color = '#EEACAE' // this can be any color
pickTextColorBasedOnBgColorSimple(color, '#FFFFFF', '#000000');

Also, thanks Alx and chetstone.

  • I used the simple function, and stripped it down a bit more: dropped the 2 last parameters and renamed is simply isDark(bgColor) My usage is then just 'color': isDark(color)?'white':'black' – diynevala Jun 21 '17 at 11:05
  • 1
    Worked like a charm for me. Thank you very much! Did it in php though simply converting the syntax and functions. – CezarBastos Mar 23 at 17:24

Here is my solution in Java for Android:

// Put this method in whichever class you deem appropriate
// static or non-static, up to you.
public static int getContrastColor(int colorIntValue) {
    int red = Color.red(colorIntValue);
    int green = Color.green(colorIntValue);
    int blue = Color.blue(colorIntValue);
    double lum = (((0.299 * red) + ((0.587 * green) + (0.114 * blue))));
    return lum > 186 ? 0xFF000000 : 0xFFFFFFFF;
}

// Usage
// If Color is represented as HEX code:
String colorHex = "#484588";
int color = Color.parseColor(colorHex);

// Or if color is Integer:
int color = 0xFF484588;

// Get White (0xFFFFFFFF) or Black (0xFF000000)
int contrastColor = WhateverClass.getContrastColor(color);
  • Perfect solution – Ajil O. Jul 14 '17 at 6:52
  • 1
    Is it really 'perfect'? Try pure green background, #00FF00. – Andreas Rejbrand Jan 2 at 21:55
  • It's true this is not tested for all colors.... but who would use a pure green background for anything that wasn't designed to annoy users? – mwieczorek Jan 3 at 11:00
  • @mwieczorek people who rely on user-generated content or randomly selected colors do. – Marc Plano-Lesay Sep 15 at 12:54

Additionally to the arithmetic solutions, it's also possible to use an AI neural network. The advantage is that you can tailor it to your own taste and needs (ie. off-white text on bright saturated reds looks good and is just as readable as black).

Here's a neat Javascript demo that illustrates the concept. You can also generate your own JS formula right in the demo.

https://harthur.github.io/brain/

Below are some charts that helped me get my mind around the problem. In the first chart, lightness is a constant 128, while hue and saturation vary. In the second chart, saturation is a constant 255, while hue and lightness vary.

In the first chart, lightness is a constant 128, while hue and saturation vary:

Saturation is a constant 255, while hue and lightness vary:

This is just an example that will change the color of an SVG checkmark when clicking on an element. It will set the checkmark color to black or white based on the background-color of the clicked element.

checkmarkColor: function(el) {
    var self = el;
    var contrast = function checkContrast(rgb) {
        // @TODO check for HEX value

        // Get RGB value between parenthesis, and remove any whitespace
        rgb = rgb.split(/\(([^)]+)\)/)[1].replace(/ /g, '');

        // map RGB values to variables
        var r = parseInt(rgb.split(',')[0], 10),
            g = parseInt(rgb.split(',')[1], 10),
            b = parseInt(rgb.split(',')[2], 10),
            a;

        // if RGBA, map alpha to variable (not currently in use)
        if (rgb.split(',')[3] !== null) {
            a = parseInt(rgb.split(',')[3], 10);
        }

        // calculate contrast of color (standard grayscale algorithmic formula)
        var contrast = (Math.round(r * 299) + Math.round(g * 587) + Math.round(b * 114)) / 1000;

        return (contrast >= 128) ? 'black' : 'white';
    };

    $('#steps .step.color .color-item .icon-ui-checkmark-shadow svg').css({
        'fill': contrast($(self).css('background-color'))
    });
}

onClickExtColor: function(evt) {
    var self = this;

    self.checkmarkColor(evt.currentTarget);
}

https://gist.github.com/dcondrey/183971f17808e9277572

I use this JavaScript function to convert rgb/rgba to 'white' or 'black'.

function getTextColor(rgba) {
    rgba = rgba.match(/\d+/g);
    if ((rgba[0] * 0.299) + (rgba[1] * 0.587) + (rgba[2] * 0.114) > 186) {
        return 'black';
    } else {
        return 'white';
    }
}

You can enter any of these formats and it will output 'black' or 'white'

  • rgb(255,255,255)
  • rgba(255,255,255,0.1)
  • color:rgba(255,255,255,0.1)
  • 255,255,255,0.1
  • Now try this with a pure green background: #00FF00. – Andreas Rejbrand Jan 2 at 22:15
  • Thank you for this! Translated into swift and used it in my ios app! – Lucas P. Jun 14 at 10:43

Based on the answer of @MarkRansom, I created a PHP script you can find here:

function calcC($c) {
    if ($c <= 0.03928) {
        return $c / 12.92;
    }
    else {
        return pow(($c + 0.055) / 1.055, 2.4);
    }
}

function cutHex($h) {
    return ($h[0] == "#") ? substr($h, 1, 7) : $h;
}

function hexToR($h) {
    return hexdec(substr(cutHex($h), 0, 2));
}

function hexToG($h) {
    return hexdec(substr(cutHex($h), 2, 2)); // Edited
}

function hexToB($h) {
    return hexdec(substr(cutHex($h), 4, 2)); // Edited
}

function computeTextColor($color) {
    $r = hexToR($color);
    $g = hexToG($color);
    $b = hexToB($color);
    $uicolors = [$r / 255, $g / 255, $b / 255];


    $c = array_map("calcC", $uicolors);

    $l = 0.2126 * $c[0] + 0.7152 * $c[1] + 0.0722 * $c[2];
    return ($l > 0.179) ? '#000000' : '#ffffff';
}

I've never done anything like this, but what about writing a function to check the values of each of the colors against the median color of Hex 7F (FF / 2). If two of the three colors are greater than 7F, then you're working with a darker color.

Mark's detailed answer works great. Here is an implementation in javascript:

function lum(rgb) {
    var lrgb = [];
    rgb.forEach(function(c) {
        c = c / 255.0;
        if (c <= 0.03928) {
            c = c / 12.92;
        } else {
            c = Math.pow((c + 0.055) / 1.055, 2.4);
        }
        lrgb.push(c);
    });
    var lum = 0.2126 * lrgb[0] + 0.7152 * lrgb[1] + 0.0722 * lrgb[2];
    return (lum > 0.179) ? '#000000' : '#ffffff';
}

Then can call this function lum([111, 22, 255]) to get white or black.

@SoBiT, I was looking at your answer, which looks good, but there is a small mistake in it. Your function hexToG, and hextoB need a minor edit. The last number in substr is the length of the string, and so in this case itshould be "2", rather than 4 or 6.

function hexToR($h) {
    return hexdec(substr(cutHex($h), 0, 2));
}
function hexToG($h) {
    return hexdec(substr(cutHex($h), 2, 2));
}
function hexToB($h) {
    return hexdec(substr(cutHex($h), 4, 2));
}

LESS has a nice contrast() function that worked nicely for me, see http://lesscss.org/functions/#color-operations-contrast

"Choose which of two colors provides the greatest contrast with another. This is useful for ensuring that a color is readable against a background, which is also useful for accessibility compliance. This function works the same way as the contrast function in Compass for SASS. In accordance with WCAG 2.0, colors are compared using their gamma-corrected luma value, not their lightness."

Example:

p {
    a: contrast(#bbbbbb);
    b: contrast(#222222, #101010);
    c: contrast(#222222, #101010, #dddddd);
    d: contrast(hsl(90, 100%, 50%), #000000, #ffffff, 30%);
    e: contrast(hsl(90, 100%, 50%), #000000, #ffffff, 80%);
}

Output:

p {
    a: #000000 // black
    b: #ffffff // white
    c: #dddddd
    d: #000000 // black
    e: #ffffff // white
}

From hex to black or white:

function hexToRgb(hex) {
  var result = /^#?([a-f\d]{2})([a-f\d]{2})([a-f\d]{2})$/i.exec(hex);
  return result
    ? [
        parseInt(result[1], 16),
        parseInt(result[2], 16),
        parseInt(result[3], 16)
      ]
    : [0, 0, 0];
}

function lum(hex) {
  var rgb = hexToRgb(hex)
  var lrgb = [];
  rgb.forEach(function(c) {
    c = c / 255.0;
    if (c <= 0.03928) {
      c = c / 12.92;
    } else {
      c = Math.pow((c + 0.055) / 1.055, 2.4);
    }
    lrgb.push(c);
  });
  var lum = 0.2126 * lrgb[0] + 0.7152 * lrgb[1] + 0.0722 * lrgb[2];
  return lum > 0.179 ? "#000000" : "#ffffff";
}

Objective-c version code for iOS based on Mark's answer:

- (UIColor *)contrastForegroundColor {
CGFloat red = 0, green = 0, blue = 0, alpha = 0;
[self getRed:&red green:&green blue:&blue alpha:&alpha];
NSArray<NSNumber *> *rgbArray = @[@(red), @(green), @(blue)];
NSMutableArray<NSNumber *> *parsedRGBArray = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:rgbArray.count];
for (NSNumber *item in rgbArray) {
    if (item.doubleValue <= 0.03928) {
        [parsedRGBArray addObject:@(item.doubleValue / 12.92)];
    } else {
        double newValue = pow((item.doubleValue + 0.055) / 1.055, 2.4);
        [parsedRGBArray addObject:@(newValue)];
    }
}

double luminance = 0.2126 * parsedRGBArray[0].doubleValue + 0.7152 * parsedRGBArray[1].doubleValue + 0.0722 * parsedRGBArray[2].doubleValue;

return luminance > 0.179 ? UIColor.blackColor : UIColor.whiteColor;
}

This is a swift version of Mark Ransom's answer as an extension of UIColor

extension UIColor {

// Get the rgba components in CGFloat
var rgba: (red: CGFloat, green: CGFloat, blue: CGFloat, alpha: CGFloat) {
    var red: CGFloat = 0, green: CGFloat = 0, blue: CGFloat = 0, alpha: CGFloat = 0

    getRed(&red, green: &green, blue: &blue, alpha: &alpha)

    return (red, green, blue, alpha)
}

/// Return the better contrasting color, white or black
func contrastColor() -> UIColor {
    let rgbArray = [rgba.red, rgba.green, rgba.blue]

    let luminanceArray = rgbArray.map({ value -> (CGFloat) in
        if value < 0.03928 {
            return (value / 12.92)
        } else {
            return (pow( (value + 0.55) / 1.055, 2.4) )
        }
    })

    let luminance = 0.2126 * luminanceArray[0] +
        0.7152 * luminanceArray[1] +
        0.0722 * luminanceArray[2]

    return luminance > 0.179 ? UIColor.black : UIColor.white
} }

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