3

What is the correct syntax for an XML comment for a class property?

2
  • M$ has some recommendations about it: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/5ast78ax.aspx They are only recommendations, though - you can use whatever you like for your custom generators. Also some of the tags are used for intelli-sense. – Jaroslav Jandek Oct 15 '10 at 14:08
  • May want to add "XML" as a tag to your question.. – KSwift87 Oct 15 '10 at 14:08
2

Install this: http://submain.com/products/ghostdoc.aspx

Right-click on the property, select 'Document This'. Fill in the blanks.

4
  • 1
    Ghostdoc is nice, but the auto-generated comments are not really helpful and can be omitted anyway. – Oliver Friedrich Oct 15 '10 at 14:14
  • Yes, but it automatically adds the correct structure. You can always edit the auto-generated text afterwards. And half the time, if you name your methods logically, it gets the comment correct. – MonkeyWrench Oct 15 '10 at 14:19
  • This doesn't answer the question. I still want to know what the correct syntax as detailed in the question regardless of whether or not there is some tool that will do it for me. This is especially the case because I'm not on windows so I'm not running visual studio so I can't use your solution. – gman Dec 2 '14 at 5:43
  • GhostDoc is a quick/easy way to add the comments. Nothing can force a developer to add comments, unless you know of some build rule that refuses to compile uncommented code... The comment on the original question provided a good link: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/5ast78ax.aspx – MonkeyWrench Feb 2 '15 at 21:47
13

In response to a request for explicit examples, the following extract is from StyleCop help document, "SA1623: PropertySummaryDocumentationMustMatchAccessors":

The property’s summary text must begin with wording describing the types of accessors exposed within the property. If the property contains only a get accessor, the summary must begin with the word “Gets”. If the property contains only a set accessor, the summary must begin with the word “Sets”. If the property exposes both a get and set accessor, the summary text must begin with “Gets or sets”.

For example, consider the following property, which exposes both a get and set accessor. The summary text begins with the words “Gets or sets”.

/// <summary>
/// Gets or sets the name of the customer. 
/// </summary>
public string Name
{
    get { return this.name; }
    set { this.name = value; }
}

If the property returns a Boolean value, an additional rule is applied. The summary text for Boolean properties must contain the words “Gets a value indicating whether”, “Sets a value indicating whether”, or “Gets or sets a value indicating whether”. For example, consider the following Boolean property, which only exposes a get accessor:

/// <summary>
/// Gets a value indicating whether the item is enabled.
/// </summary>
public bool Enabled
{
    get { return this.enabled; }
}

In some situations, the set accessor for a property can have more restricted access than the get accessor. For example:

/// <summary>
/// Gets the name of the customer. 
/// </summary>
public string Name
{
    get { return this.name; }
    private set { this.name = value; }
}

In this example, the set accessor has been given private access, meaning that it can only be accessed by local members of the class in which it is contained. The get accessor, however, inherits its access from the parent property, thus it can be accessed by any caller, since the property has public access.

In this case, the documentation summary text should avoid referring to the set accessor, since it is not visible to external callers.

StyleCop applies a series of rules to determine when the set accessor should be referenced in the property’s summary documentation. In general, these rules require the set accessor to be referenced whenever it is visible to the same set of callers as the get accessor, or whenever it is visible to external classes or inheriting classes.

The specific rules for determining whether to include the set accessor in the property’s summary documentation are:

1.The set accessor has the same access level as the get accessor. For example:

/// <summary>
/// Gets or sets the name of the customer. 
/// </summary>
protected string Name
{
    get { return this.name; }
    set { this.name = value; }
}

2.The property is only internally accessible within the assembly, and the set accessor also has internal access. For example:

internal class Class1
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets the name of the customer. 
    /// </summary>
    protected string Name
    {
        get { return this.name; }
        internal set { this.name = value; }
    }
}

internal class Class1
{
    public class Class2
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Gets or sets the name of the customer. 
        /// </summary>
        public string Name
        {
            get { return this.name; }
            internal set { this.name = value; }
        }
    }
}

3.The property is private or is contained beneath a private class, and the set accessor has any access modifier other than private. In the example below, the access modifier declared on the set accessor has no meaning, since the set accessor is contained within a private class and thus cannot be seen by other classes outside of Class1. This effectively gives the set accessor the same access level as the get accessor.

public class Class1
{
    private class Class2
    {
        public class Class3
        {
            /// <summary>
            /// Gets or sets the name of the customer. 
            /// </summary>
            public string Name
            {
                get { return this.name; }
                internal set { this.name = value; }
            }
        }
    }
}

4.Whenever the set accessor has protected or protected internal access, it should be referenced in the documentation. A protected or protected internal set accessor can always been seen by a class inheriting from the class containing the property.

internal class Class1
{
    public class Class2
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Gets or sets the name of the customer. 
        /// </summary>
        internal string Name
        {
            get { return this.name; }
            protected set { this.name = value; }
        }
    }

    private class Class3 : Class2
    {
        public Class3(string name) { this.Name = name; }
    }
}
1

I'd suggest to use StyleCop. It does not only enforce (a bit to strong for my taste) you to comment, but also gives you a hint how the comments should be startet.

1
  • Actually, it is indirectly... every single StyleCop warning type has a help page with examples that can be viewed by right-clicking on the warning and clicking 'Show Error Help'. – Riegardt Steyn Dec 2 '14 at 13:49
0

According to MSDN, link, it appears there isn't an official tag for Class Properties. But, I would use something like this:

/// <summary>Here is an example of a propertylist:
/// <list type="Properties">
/// <item>
/// <description>Property 1.</description>
/// </item>
/// <item>
/// <description>Property 2.</description>
/// </item>
/// </list>
/// </summary>

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