-2

suppose I got a node like this:

struct node{
  int a;
  int b;
} 

Now I want to make a queue structure in cpp. If the data type was int then we could do that easily in this way:

queue<int> a;

And we could also push or pop elements like this: a. push_back(12) or a. pop(12)

But in the earlier case when out data type is user defined how can we make such a queue and push or pop elemeqnts from it?

  • 2
    I don't get what your problem is. You can well use std::queue<node> as you like. (Didn't dv BTW) – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 11 '16 at 9:13
  • 1
    Exactly the same way, replace int with node. Have you even tried it? – Martin Nyolt Sep 11 '16 at 9:15
  • How to push element there. Suppose I want to push 11, 12 for the first node. – Amir Khasru Sep 11 '16 at 9:16
  • You should create an object of node and then push it. – max_hassen Sep 11 '16 at 9:21
  • 1
    @AmirKhasru Something like a.push_back(node{11,12}) maybe? – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 11 '16 at 9:24
1
0
// Example program
#include <iostream>
#include <queue>

using namespace std;

struct s1{
    int a;
    string b;
};

class Foo{
    public:
    int a;
    string b;
};

int main()
{
  queue<Foo> q;
  Foo obj;
  obj.a=2;
  obj.b="Object";
  q.push(obj);
  Foo p=q.back();

  cout<<p.a<<endl;
  cout<<p.b<<endl;

  return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Nice explanation. :) – Amir Khasru Sep 12 '16 at 15:49
3
0

There is absolutely no problem in holding non-PODs like struct or class inside container like queue.

struct s1{
    int a;
    string b;
};
class Foo{
    int a;
    string b;
};
int main() {
    queue<int> qi;
    queue<s1> qs;
    queue<Foo> qfoo;
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Nice. It was awesome. But how to push such class or struct node there? – Amir Khasru Sep 11 '16 at 9:19
  • 1
    Basically you use containers to hold multiple instances of class or struct. So create instance and push them in. Then you can sort them, delete them, add more and do whatever you wish. – Saurav Sahu Sep 11 '16 at 9:21
  • @SauravSahu Show them how to do actually. Feel free to take that from my comment. – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 11 '16 at 9:25
  • suppose I got a queue like this: queue<node>a. Now I want to push there 11 and 12. Then how can I push them? Push_back(11, 12)? This way? – Amir Khasru Sep 11 '16 at 9:26
  • @AmirKhasru Read my comment. – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 11 '16 at 9:28
1
0

If you have

struct node{
    int a;
    int b;
};

std::queue<node> q;

you can use push as follows:

q.push({ 11, 12 });

this adds a node with a = 11 and b = 12.

This works as long as copy-list-initialization is possible, as it is in this case. Otherwise you would have to use q.push(node{ 11, 12 });

| improve this answer | |
  • Supposed the constructor wasn't declared explicit. – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 11 '16 at 9:37
  • @πάνταῥεῖ What constructor? – DeiDei Sep 11 '16 at 9:45
  • @DeiDei One imaginary given. I'm just trying to explore the whole space of possibilities. – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 11 '16 at 9:48
-4
0

Use queue a; make objects of node type and use functions a.push_back() a.pop_front() to push and pop respectively.Also don't forget to #include queue.

| improve this answer | |

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