In my mysql database, I have two tables, project and sub_project. Subproject contains an id and an acronym; subproject has a project_id which tells which main project it belongs to. The database looks like this:

mysql> SELECT id, acronym FROM project;
+----+---------+
| id | acronym |
+----+---------+
| 14 | P1      |
| 15 | P2      |
| 16 | P3      |
+----+---------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SELECT id, project_id FROM subproject;
+----+------------+
| id | project_id |
+----+------------+
|  1 |         14 |
|  2 |         14 |
+----+------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

I want to make a query that displays the id and acronym of each project, along with the number of subprojects, like so:

SELECT id, acronym, COUNT(select * FROM sub_project WHERE project_id=id) AS 'sub_proj_count'
FROM project;
+----+---------+----------------+
| id | acronym | sub_proj_count |
+----+---------+----------------+
| 14 | P1      | 2              |
| 15 | P2      | 0              |
| 16 | P3      | 0              |
+----+---------+----------------+

However, this is syntactically incorrect. How should this be formulated?

  • You could do a join and avoid a slow subquery. But your results are right, right? – Drew Sep 11 '16 at 10:51
  • The problem is not that it is slow, it's that it gives me a syntax error and does not work. I.e. the printout from the select statement is what I want to achieve, not what I get. I would be happy with a fix that made it work largely as stated, even if it is slow. – NiklasR Sep 11 '16 at 10:54
  • Do a join with a count and group by – Drew Sep 11 '16 at 10:55
  • I tried with SELECT project.id, project.acronym, COUNT(subproject.id) FROM project INNER JOIN subproject ON project.id=subproject.project_id; but this only gives me projects which have subprojects. I want to the count for all, even those with zero subprojects. – NiklasR Sep 11 '16 at 11:16
  • 1
    SELECT id, acronym, (select COUNT(*) FROM sub_project WHERE project_id=project.id) AS 'sub_proj_count' FROM project; should fix your query. But i'd use a left join. – Paul Spiegel Sep 11 '16 at 14:06
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Schema:

create table project
(   id int not null,
    acronym varchar(100) not null
);
insert project values
(14,'P1'),
(15,'P2'),
(16,'P3');

create table subproject
(   id int not null,
    project_id int not null
);
insert subproject values
(1,14),
(2,14);

Projects that have a subproject:

select p.id,p.acronym,count(s.id) as theCount 
from project p 
join subproject s 
on s.project_id=p.id 
group by p.id,p.acronym; 

+----+---------+----------+
| id | acronym | theCount |
+----+---------+----------+
| 14 | P1      |        2 |
+----+---------+----------+

All Projects even those with no subprojects:

select p.id,p.acronym,count(s.id) as theCount 
from project p 
left join subproject s 
on s.project_id=p.id 
group by p.id,p.acronym; 

+----+---------+----------+
| id | acronym | theCount |
+----+---------+----------+
| 14 | P1      |        2 |
| 15 | P2      |        0 |
| 16 | P3      |        0 |
+----+---------+----------+

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