After running my program that generates passwords multiple times I get an IndexError: list Index out of range. I am not sure what is causing the problem

import string
import random

def random_pass(length):
    alphabet = list(string.ascii_letters + string.digits + string.punctuation)
    password = []
    upper_case = list(string.ascii_uppercase)
    count = 0
    while count < length:
            random_num = random.randint(0,len(alphabet))
            password.append(alphabet[random_num])
            #Checks to see if first character is a uppercase Letter
            if password[0] not in upper_case:
                first_letter = random.randint(0,len(upper_case))
                password[0] = upper_case[first_letter]
            count += 1
    return ''.join(password)
def welcome():
  print("*****************************************************************")
  print("*****************************************************************")


def main(): 
    try:
        get_length = int(input("Please enter the length of your password "))
    except ValueError:
        print("Please enter numbers only")
        main()
    else:
        print("Your {} character password is {}".format(get_length, random_pass(get_length)))
        restart = input("Do you wish to create another password? y/n")
        password = []
    if restart.lower() == 'y':
        main()
    else:
        exit()
main()
  • You need to include not only the error message IndexError: list Index out of range but also the full traceback into the question itself. – Antti Haapala Sep 11 '16 at 14:38

random.randint can generate the end value as well; you'd need to use random.randrange to generate random numbers in the range that includes the start value and excludes the end.

Antti Haapala's answers your question but I see a few things that could be improved in your code. The idea is to make your code clearer.

First of all here's my version of your code:

import string
import random

alphabet = string.ascii_letters + string.digits + string.punctuation

def random_pass(length):
    first_character = random.choice(string.ascii_uppercase)
    password = ''.join(random.choice(alphabet) for x in range(length - 1))
    return first_character + password

another_password = True
while another_password:
    try:
        length_requested = int(input("Please enter the length of your password "))
    except ValueError:
        print("Please enter numbers only")
        another_password = True
    else:
        print("Your {} character password is {}".format(length_requested, random_pass(length_requested)))
        restart = input("Do you wish to create another password (Y/N)? ")
        another_password = restart.lower() == 'y'

The modifications I made of you code:

  • Since alphabet is never modified, you don't need to recreate it each time you call random_pass(). I have put it in the global scope outside of every functions
  • Since you can access a character inside a string the same way you access an element in a list you don't need to create a list with the content of alphabet or string.ascii_uppercase.
  • You don't gain more understanding defining a variable with the same content of string.ascii_uppercase
  • Instead of choosing a random number that you use to choose a character in alphabet, you can directly choose a random character with random.choice(alphabet)
  • It looks like you have a requirement that the first character of the password has to be an upper case letter. In your code you check this inside your while-loop for each new character but that first character won't change once you set it. So I dragged it outside of this loop.
  • To build the rest of the password, I used a generator expression to choose a random character from alphabet and the .join() string method. Since I have already chosen the first character I only need length - 1 random characters.
  • You don't need to define main() if all you do is call it later.
    • Even if you define main() it's not a good idea to call it recursively because for every new password requested (and every time an invalid input is entered by the user), your code has to create a new small scope environment for this function call and, more importantly, it has to keep of all previous small scope environment. You risk exhausting memory eventually. I have used instead a while-loop.
  • restart.lower() == 'y' will give a boolean value I have used to change another_password which controls whether we continue to ask the user if it wants a new password
  • You don't need to call exit() unless you want to return an exit code to the environment.

If you have more questions, don't hesitate to ask. And continue experimenting.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.