8

I want to create a hash reference with code references mapped to scalars(strings) as its' members.

So far I have a map reference that looks something like this:

my $object; 
$object = {
    'code1' => sub {
        print $_[0];
    },
    'code2' => sub {
        return 'Hello, World!';
    },
    'code3' => sub {
        $object->{code1}->($object->{code2}->());
    }
}; 
$object->{code3}->();

I would like to be able to "bless" 'code3' reference in $object with $object so I can do something like:

my $object; 
$object = {
    'code1' => sub {
        print $_[0];
    },
    'code2' => sub {
        return 'Hello, World!';
    },
    'code3' => sub {
        $self = shift;
        $self->{code1}->($self->{code2}->());
    }
}; 
$object->{code3}->();

however bless only works with packages, rather than hash tables.

Is there any way to do this in Perl 5 version 22?

Note: now that I think of it, it's better to pass $object to the method explicitly, as it solves javascript's "this" problem. I am just too used to Java's "this" which makes sense in Java where everything is a class and therefore all methods have a "this", but in scripting, it really helps to know if the "this" is actually passed, or is it just called as a function(and you end up accidentally polluting global scope or triggering strict warning) passing $self explicitly makes it clear that you are not calling it as a function, but as a method.

  • 3
    eval.in/639754 (possible memory leak => metacpan.org/pod/Scalar::Util#weaken) – Сухой27 Sep 11 '16 at 18:10
  • @Сухой27 it's lets the scope not be bound to a specific object, so I am free to rename the $object from $object to $object2 without needing to change internal code. I am having a bit of a struggle understanding your second comment. Interesting comment about memory leak though. Circular references in Perl are more problematic than in JavaScript since it uses reference counting, rather than mark and sweep. – Dmitry Sep 11 '16 at 18:30
  • It is possible to end up with hash not being released when $object goes out of scope. I'm not sure why you would like to avoid packages; eval.in/639768 – Сухой27 Sep 11 '16 at 18:57
  • @Сухой27 my concern with packages is that I can't seem to create packages at runtime, but I can create hash tables at runtime, so they seem more flexible an easier to inspect. Also, I can't create Perl Object Notation around packages, but I can with maps, so I can serialize objects/deserialize objects but I don't think I can do this with packages since I can't have a function create a package with variable package name. Also, I don't know how to "remove" a package once I declare it, whereas maps can be released when they leave scope. – Dmitry Sep 11 '16 at 18:59
  • 1
    You can add package methods at compile time: stackoverflow.com/a/28373893/223226 ('If you don't know the name at compile time' part) – Сухой27 Sep 11 '16 at 19:08
5

You are doing sub calls (not method calls), so you simply forgot to pass $self as a parameter.

my $object = {
    code1 => sub {
        print $_[0];
    },
    code2 => sub {
        return 'Hello, World!';
    },
    code3 => sub {
        my $self = shift;
        $self->{code1}->( $self, $self->{code2}->($self) );
    }
}; 
$object->{code3}->($object);

But I think you're trying to create JavaScript-like objects. You can start with the following:

package PrototypeObject;

sub new {
   my $class = shift;
   my $self = bless({}, $class);
   %$self = @_;
   return $self;
}

sub AUTOLOAD {
   my $self = shift;
   ( my $method = our $AUTOLOAD ) =~ s/^.*:://s;
   return $self->{$method}->($self, @_);
}

1;

use PrototypeObject qw( );

my $object = PrototypeObject->new(
    code1 => sub {
        print $_[1];
    },
    code2 => sub {
        return 'Hello, World!';
    },
    code3 => sub {
        my $self = shift;
        $self->code1( $self->code2() );
    }
); 

$object->code3();

Note that this will slow down your method calls as it must call AUTOLOAD before calling your method. This could be addressed by overloading the method call operator.

Check on CPAN. Someone might already have a more complete implementation.

  • I guess this is the purest approach I can use without resorting to wrappers. I was hoping there was language features allowing this kind of binding without object needing to pass itself to the coderef that is inside itself. eg, sub references act more like () => {} in javascript than function, and have no "this" unless you bless them into a package. I can imagine ways around this by creating a "Function package" that magically behaves the way I want via blessing hashes into it/or something similar, but I don't know enough Perl to express it let alone express it in a way that makes sense. – Dmitry Sep 11 '16 at 20:46
  • To be clear, I didn't "forget" to add the $object, I was wondering if there was a way to bind $object's refs to $object which is a ref so that this behavior was "implicit". – Dmitry Sep 11 '16 at 20:50
  • It can't implicitly do a method call when you explicitly do a sub call. But see update – ikegami Sep 11 '16 at 20:52
  • YES this is exactly what I wanted to know! Thanks! – Dmitry Sep 11 '16 at 20:52
  • that's a nice solution. – stevieb Sep 11 '16 at 23:52
2

This is not the exact syntax you want, but Perl 5 supports many ways of making method calls, including method calls via strings. So you could say:

#!/usr/bin/perl

{ package Foo;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub new { bless {}, shift }

sub code1 { my $self = shift; print "$_[0]\n" };
sub code2 { "Hello, World!" }
sub code3 {
    my $self = shift;
    my $method1 = "code1";
    my $method2 = "code2";
    $self->$method1($self->$method2);
}

}

use strict;
use warnings;

my $o = Foo->new;

print "normal call\n";
$o->code3;

print "via string\n";
my $method = "code3";
$o->$method;

Also, remember that a package's symbol table is a hash: %Foo::, so you can always go spelunking in there yourself:

#!/usr/bin/perl

{ package Foo;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub new { bless {}, shift }

sub code1 { my $self = shift; print "$_[0]\n" };
sub code2 { "Hello, World!" }
sub code3 {
    my $self = shift;
    my $method1 = "code1";
    my $method2 = "code2";
    $self->$method1($self->$method2);
}

}

use strict;
use warnings;

print $Foo::{code2}->(), "\n";

However, I would suggest having a really code reason for these techniques as it can make maintenance a nightmare (eg imaging trying to find all of the code calling Foo::approved, you can't just grep for "->approved" because the actual call is ->$state()).

I just read the comments and noticed you said

my concern with packages is that I can't seem to create packages at runtime, but I can create hash tables at runtime

Perl 5 does allow you to create packages at runtime. In fact, depending on how you define runtime, you can do anything at runtime with string eval as it reenters compile time when it is called. But there is also a pure-runtime method of manipulating the symbol tables with typeglobs:

#!/usr/bin/perl

{ package Foo;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub new { bless {}, shift }

}

use strict;
use warnings;

my $o = Foo->new;

# here we add functions at runtime to the package Foo
{
no warnings "once";
*Foo::code1 = sub { my $self = shift; print "$_[0]\n" };
*Foo::code2 = sub { "Hello, World!" };
*Foo::code3 = sub {
    my $self = shift;
    my $method1 = "code1";
    my $method2 = "code2";
    $self->$method1($self->$method2);
};
}

$o->code3;

Because Perl 5 is object oriented (and not object based like JavaScript) these methods are attached to all Foo objects. If you want individual objects have their own symbol tables, then I am there are certainly ways to do that. Off the top of my head, AUTOLOAD comes to mind:

#!/usr/bin/perl

{ package Foo;

use strict;
use Carp;
use warnings;

sub new {
    bless {
        symtab => {}
    }, shift
}

sub AUTOLOAD {
    my $self = shift;
    our $AUTOLOAD;
    my $method = $AUTOLOAD =~ s/.*:://r;

    my (undef, $file, $line) = caller();

    die "$method does not exist at $file line $line"
        unless exists $self->{symtab}{$method};

    $self->{symtab}{$method}->($self, @_);
}

sub DESTROY {} # prevent DESTROY method from being hijacked by AUTOLOAD

}

use v5.22;
use warnings;

my $o1 = Foo->new;
my $o2 = Foo->new;

$o1->{symtab}{inc} = sub { my $self = shift; $self->{i}++; };

$o1->inc;
$o1->inc;
$o1->inc;

say "inc called on o1 $o1->{i} times";

$o2->inc; #dies because we haven't defined inc for $o2 yet

Perl 5 is very flexible and will let you do just about anything you want (after all the motto is TIMTOWTDI), but you should always keep in mind the future programmer tasked with maintaining your code who may want to hunt you down and wear your skin for doing some of these tricks.

This question has a definite XY problem feel. It seems like you are trying to solve a problem in Perl 5 the same way you would have solved it in JavaScript. While Perl 5 will let you do that (as I have demonstrated), there may be a more idiomatic way of achieving the same effect. Can you describe what you are trying to do (not how you want to do it) in a different question and we can suggest the ways in which we would solve your problem.

  • Is there any reading I can read to see a list of differences between a package(something I don't really understand), and a hashes(something I don't understand less)? packages are really strange to me; I know how to go through keys in a hash, but how do I go through members of a package? I know how to check types of hash members, but how do I check types of package members? – Dmitry Sep 11 '16 at 20:35
  • Another thing is I have no idea how to check type of a "sub a{}" non reference that is in another package, or how to add a sub b{} non reference to another package from outside the package b is defined into(is this even possible?) – Dmitry Sep 11 '16 at 20:43
  • Thanks for the elaborate answer, this is far from idiomatic question, I was mainly interested in how to reproduce JavaScript-like evaluatable-module behavior "Perl Object Notation"(eg read .pl file with an anonymous function that returns a list or a hash, and eval it into the ref type and use it to create objects using its internal "coderefs"). Perl is available on all unix-like systems, but nodejs isn't so I want to know how much concepts in js can be expressed with Perl). – Dmitry Sep 11 '16 at 21:00
  • 1
    Yes, and it is literally that syntax: "sub PACKAGE::SUBNAME {}". You can say that anywhere and it will create a funciton named SUBNAME in PACKAGE. You can even redefine existing subroutines (but you might want to say no warnings "redefine" first or you will get a warning). If you want to redefine a function, but still call the existing function, you can grab the old coderef with a typeglob first: my $old = *PACKAGE::SUBNAME{CODE}; you can then call it just like a normal coderef: $old->();. – Chas. Owens Sep 11 '16 at 21:12
  • 1
    Well, Perl 5 does sort of allow you to get the code back as a string. You can translate the opcodes back into readable Perl 5. Take a look at Data::Dumper's $Data::Dumper::Deparse option: perl -MData::Dumper -E '$Data::Dumper::Deparse = 1; print Dumper sub { my $foo = 5; say $foo }'. The downside is it can't fixup closures and there is some code loss/translation due to the compile phase. – Chas. Owens Sep 11 '16 at 21:16

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