8

I'd like to assume a given type implements some trait (e.g. Default) with a method (e.g. default()). I want to call that method and store its value into a local variable. Here is a general idea of it:

macro_rules! get_default {
    (  $x:ty = $alias:ident ) => {
        let $alias = $x::default();
    };
}

fn main() {
    // get_default!(i32 = z); 
    // println!("get_default! {:?} ", z);
    println!("i32 default {:?} ", i32::default());
}

Playground link.

When I try that I get an error:

error: expected expression, found `i32`
 --> <anon>:3:22
  |>
3 |>         let $alias = $x::default();
  |>                      ^^

I understand it's because it expects an expression, but I want to limit input to types only. Is there a way to turn $x from ty to expr, or a way to call a method on a type (even if it's potentially missing).

1 Answer 1

8

You were almost there. You can hint the expected default type to the compiler and then just use the universal function call syntax:

macro_rules! get_default {
    (  $x:ty = $alias:ident ) => {
        let $alias = <$x as Default>::default();
    };
}

fn main() {
    get_default!(i32 = z); 
    println!("get_default! {:?} ", z);
    println!("i32 default {:?} ", i32::default());
}

(Playground link)

The key bit is this:

let $alias = <$x as Default>::default();

This casts $x to the Default trait and then invokes the default() method, as you needed.

You can also use a shorthand when you don't need to disambiguate between traits:

let $alias = <$x>::default();

(Playground link)

More General Usage of UFCS

Using UFCS as shown above, you can disambiguate between traits that implement the same methods. This is the 'angle-bracket form' which is useful if the default() method is implemented in two traits.

In this specific scenario, you can also use UFCS more specifically, like so:

let $alias: $x = Default::default();

That alone provides enough information for Rust to infer the correct impl.

(Playground link)

5
  • 3
    May want to add that the direct way of doing this is <$x as Default>::default(). In general, you can use <Type> to refer to types in paths that aren't directly valid as paths (which include macro substitutions, [_], and &T).
    – DK.
    Sep 12, 2016 at 15:54
  • Yes, DK solution is actually what I was looking for, because I wanted a more general solution, than just works with Default. Sep 12, 2016 at 15:57
  • @DK Expanded with a section on your suggested methods. If there are any details I've missed that you feel are important, feel free to suggest them.
    – Aurora0001
    Sep 12, 2016 at 16:01
  • @Aurora0001: The answer I was looking for was <$x as Default>, note I said e.g. Default. If trait doesn't return Self, I can't use let $alias: $x = Default::default(); I used Default as example because it's the first trait that popped to my mind. Sep 12, 2016 at 16:07
  • 1
    @DanielFath: updated my answer to be more like what you wanted and fixed the playground links that were outdated.
    – Aurora0001
    Sep 12, 2016 at 16:18

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