19

I'd like to replace boost::variants with C++17 std::variant and get rid of boost::recursive_wrapper, to remove dependency on boost completely in following code. How may I do that?

#include <boost/variant.hpp>
#include <type_traits>

using v = boost::variant<int, boost::recursive_wrapper<struct s> >;
struct s
{
    v val;
};

template<template <typename...> class R, typename T, typename ... Ts>
auto reduce(T t, Ts ... /*ts*/)
{
    return R<T, Ts...>{t};
}

template<typename T, typename F>
T adapt(F f)
{
    static_assert(std::is_convertible_v<F, T>, "");
    return f;
}

int main()
{
    int  val1 = 42;
    s    val2;
    auto val3 = adapt<v>(reduce<boost::variant>(val1, val2));
}

There are two generic functions: first function reduce chooses at runtime which argument to return (here it just returns first argument for brevity), second function adapt converts a value of type F to a value of type T.

In this example reduce returns an object of type boost::variant<int, s> which is then converted to an object of type boost::variant<int, boost::recursive_wrapper<s> >.

  • You could use a std::variant<int, std::unique_ptr<s>>. But you need to modify adapt to map an s to a unique_ptr<s>. – kennytm Sep 12 '16 at 17:21
  • Have you considered using an std::reference_wrapper ? – Wormer Aug 19 '18 at 12:31
17

boost::variant will heap allocate in order to have part of itself be recursively defined as itself. (It will also heap allocate in a number of other situations, uncertain how many)

std::variant will not. std::variant refuses to heap allocate.

There is no way to actually have a structure containing a possible variant of itself without a dynamic allocation, as such a structure can easily be shown to be infinite in size if statically declared. (You can encode the integer N by having N recursions of not-the-same: no fixed size buffer can hold an infinite amount of information.)

As such, the equivalent std::variant stores a smart pointer of some kind placeholder of a recursive instance of itself.

This may work:

struct s;
using v = std::variant< int, std::unique_ptr<s> >;
struct s
{
  v val;
  ~s();
};
inline s::~s() = default;

and failing that, try:

struct destroy_s;
struct s;
using v = std::variant<int, std::unique_ptr<s, destroy_s> >;
struct s
{
  v val;
  ~s();
};
struct destroy_s {
  void operator()(s* ptr){ delete ptr; }
};
inline s::~s() = default;

It does mean that client code has to knowingly interact with the unique_ptr<s> and not the struct s directly.

If you want to support copy semantics, you'll have to write a value_ptr that does copies, and give it the equivalent of struct copy_s; to implement that copy.

template<class T>
struct default_copier {
  // a copier must handle a null T const* in and return null:
  T* operator()(T const* tin)const {
    if (!tin) return nullptr;
    return new T(*tin);
  }
  void operator()(void* dest, T const* tin)const {
    if (!tin) return;
    return new(dest) T(*tin);
  }
};
template<class T, class Copier=default_copier<T>, class Deleter=std::default_delete<T>,
  class Base=std::unique_ptr<T, Deleter>
>
struct value_ptr:Base, private Copier {
  using copier_type=Copier;
  // also typedefs from unique_ptr

  using Base::Base;

  value_ptr( T const& t ):
    Base( std::make_unique<T>(t) ),
    Copier()
  {}
  value_ptr( T && t ):
    Base( std::make_unique<T>(std::move(t)) ),
    Copier()
  {}
  // almost-never-empty:
  value_ptr():
    Base( std::make_unique<T>() ),
    Copier()
  {}

  value_ptr( Base b, Copier c={} ):
    Base(std::move(b)),
    Copier(std::move(c))
  {}

  Copier const& get_copier() const {
    return *this;
  }

  value_ptr clone() const {
    return {
      Base(
        get_copier()(this->get()),
        this->get_deleter()
      ),
      get_copier()
    };
  }
  value_ptr(value_ptr&&)=default;
  value_ptr& operator=(value_ptr&&)=default;

  value_ptr(value_ptr const& o):value_ptr(o.clone()) {}
  value_ptr& operator=(value_ptr const&o) {
    if (o && *this) {
      // if we are both non-null, assign contents:
      **this = *o;
    } else {
      // otherwise, assign a clone (which could itself be null):
      *this = o.clone();
    }
    return *this;
  }
  value_ptr& operator=( T const& t ) {
    if (*this) {
      **this = t;
    } else {
      *this = value_ptr(t);
    }
    return *this;
  }
  value_ptr& operator=( T && t ) {
    if (*this) {
      **this = std::move(t);
    } else {
      *this = value_ptr(std::move(t));
    }
    return *this;
  }
  T& get() { return **this; }
  T const& get() const { return **this; }
  T* get_pointer() {
    if (!*this) return nullptr;
    return std::addressof(get());
  }
  T const* get_pointer() const {
    if (!*this) return nullptr;
    return std::addressof(get());
  }
  // operator-> from unique_ptr
};
template<class T, class...Args>
value_ptr<T> make_value_ptr( Args&&... args ) {
  return {std::make_unique<T>(std::forward<Args>(args)...)};
}

Live example of value_ptr.

  • I don't quite see why do you need to clone when you could just assign (in other words - noisy::operator= is never called), but thats ok, because this is not what I'm asking for. You see, Boost (including Boost.Variant) made by experts, and there is an existing practice (recursive variants). Now std::variant is getting standardized without recursion as if it is not essential. What I would like to see is an explanation of why recursion support is not important and to make it more concrete I give a code example for you to modify (to prevent answers like "use unique_ptr, promblem solved"). – sms Sep 13 '16 at 17:10
  • 2
    @sms That is explained in paragraph 1 and 2: because it was decided that std::variant does not use the heap. Paragraph 3 concludes why std::variant could not have the recursive structure you want, regardless of the trick you are using. std::variant has different operational semantics than boost::variant. Among other things, it is almost-never-empty instead of never-empty like boost. The cost for boost::variant is that it will invoke the equivalent of new way more often, while std::variant is a tagged union that stores its data inside itself. value_ptr provides a solution. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Sep 13 '16 at 17:21
  • My value_ptr emulates value semantics while storing a pointer. clone is needed to implement value_ptr(value_ptr const&). As it happens, it also provides an easy to write operator=. An allocation can be avoided there by using operator= on the stored value: we could make this conditional on operator= being legal. I went with the simpler code. I'll add a variant. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Sep 13 '16 at 17:26
  • @Yakk: I disagree with your conclusions here. Yes, Boost.Variant will heap-allocate on occasion. But that isn't what makes its variant type permit recursion; that's all done through recursive_wrapper, which implements the effective equivalent of your value_ptr. The standard library could have provided a similar recursive_wrapper class without affecting the definition of std::variant at all. Indeed, you can use boost::recursive_wrapper with std::variant without problems. – Nicol Bolas Sep 13 '16 at 17:34
  • @sms: "What I would like to see is an explanation of why recursion support is not important" That's not what your question asked. You asked for how to avoid using Boost while still getting recursive behavior. – Nicol Bolas Sep 13 '16 at 17:45

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.