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I have a file which is composed of several parts split by a specific string and letter like so:

--673b0e57-A--
content here
--673b0e57-B--
content here
--673b0e57-C--
content here
--673b0e57-F--
content here

I have created a method to parse this into an object like so:

for (String line:file) {
            if ((line.matches(".*-{1}[A]-{2}$") || currentPart == "A") && (!line.matches(".*-{1}[B|C|E|F|H|I|K|Z]-{2}$")) ) {
                currentPart = "A";
                //do stuff
            } else if ((line.matches(".*-{1}[B]-{2}$") || currentPart == "B") && (!line.matches(".*-{1}[C|E|F|H|I|K|Z]-{2}$")) ) {
                currentPart = "B";
                //do stuff
            } else if((line.matches(".*-{1}[C]-{2}$") || currentPart == "C") && (!line.matches(".*-{1}[E|F|H|I|K|Z]-{2}$")) ) {
                currentPart = "C";
                //do stuff
            } else if((line.matches(".*-{1}[E]-{2}$") || currentPart == "E") && (!line.matches(".*-{1}[F|H|I|K|Z]-{2}$")) ) {
                currentPart = "E";
                //do stuff
            } else if((line.matches(".*-{1}[F]-{2}$") || currentPart == "F") && (!line.matches(".*-{1}[H|I|K|Z]-{2}$")) ) {
                currentPart = "F";
                //do stuff
            } else if((line.matches(".*-{1}[H]-{2}$") || currentPart == "H") && (!line.matches(".*-{1}[I|K|Z]-{2}$")) ) {
                currentPart = "H";
                //do stuff
            } else if((line.matches(".*-{1}[I]-{2}$") || currentPart == "I") && (!line.matches(".*-{1}[K|Z]-{2}$")) ) {
                currentPart = "I";
                //do stuff
            } else if((line.matches(".*-{1}[K]-{2}$") || currentPart == "K") && (!line.matches(".*-{1}[Z]-{2}$")) ) {
                currentPart = "K";
                //do stuff
            } else if((line.matches(".*-{1}[Z]-{2}$") || currentPart == "Z")) {
                currentPart = "Z";
                //do stuff
            } else {
                System.out.println("No line marker to be found while parsing file!");
            }
        }

Basically what happens is: 1. Check if A and remember if so 2. check if any other letter, if not continue with A else go to B 3. etc

But I find this solution to be a bit ugly. Is there a better way to do this? This can be in terms of readability or memoryusage. Someone I know told me to use java.util.regex.Pattern. But as far as i can see you would still need to do the same regex so it seems like there is no bonus at all. Am I missing something perhaps?

kind regards

EDIT: Ok so i've looked at the solution proposed by @brso05 and written by @Jeutnarg and this is the result:

String[] strings = new String[]{"--673b0e57-A--", "blah", "--673b0e57-B--", "something", "hello"};
        Pattern p = Pattern.compile("--.*-([ABCEFHIKZ])--");
        String currentPart = null;
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        for(String s : strings)
        {
            Matcher m = p.matcher(s);
            if(m.find())
            {
                if(currentPart != null){
                    storeData(builder.toString(), currentPart);
                    System.out.println(builder.toString());
                }
                currentPart = m.group(1);
                System.out.println("Current part is "+m.group(1));
            }else{
                if(currentPart != null){
                    builder.append(s);
                }
            }
        }
        storeData(builder.toString(), currentPart);
        System.out.println(builder.toString());
    }

private void storeData(String data, String part){
        switch (part){
            case "A": //objectA
                break;
            case "B": //objectB
                break;
            ...
        }
    }

Its looking a lot better I think. Not as much patterns that need to be loaded etc. Any more interesting idea's to add on to this?

  • You could use a capturing group to capture the letter...then dynamically set to whatever the letter is instead of hard coding A, B, etc... – brso05 Sep 12 '16 at 18:39
  • I'm confused. What is the purpose of writing -{1}? It's the same as -. What is the purpose of -{2}? It's the same as --. You do know that X{n} means "X, exactly n times", right? See javadoc. – Andreas Sep 12 '16 at 18:40
  • Do u execute different code for each letter? – brso05 Sep 12 '16 at 18:40
  • @brso05 I expect it's a misunderstanding. Like the misunderstanding of what [B|C|E|F|H|I|K|Z] means. It's the same as [BCEFHIKZ|], and is very likely not what was intended, since I don't believe OP wants to match a |. – Andreas Sep 12 '16 at 18:43
  • @Andreas Yeah, I know its the same but I didn't think about it when creating these regex. I'll fix it. – Kenny Steegmans Sep 12 '16 at 19:27
3

As brrso05 pointed out, a capture group can do what you are trying to do. You make a Pattern with a capture group (the part that's surrounded by parenthesis), then make a Matcher object for each String. Call find (or matches) to determine if the String worked, and then use the group(X) method to get that match.

Here's a little code bit that'll do what you are trying to do. You may notice that group(X) is 1-indexed, not 0-indexed.

String[] strings = new String[]{"hello", "blah", "--673b0e57-A--", "something", "--673b0e57-B--"};
    Pattern p = Pattern.compile("--.*-(\\w)--");
    for(String s : strings)
    {
        Matcher m = p.matcher(s);
        if(m.find())
        {
            System.out.println("Current part is "+m.group(1));
        }
    }

Caveat emptor - the pattern I've created will match some stuff you may not want to match, like a lower-case letter. Do your own testing (I recommend regex101.com for testing regex quickly) before trying it in production or somewhere important.

  • Try input {"hello", "blah", "--673b0e57-A--", "something", "--98bad765-B--"}. Oops, it says that part B was found, but it's not part B, since the prefix is wrong. – Andreas Sep 12 '16 at 18:51
  • @Andreas his question uses .* so it doesn't care about the prefix just the pattern .*-LETTER--... – brso05 Sep 12 '16 at 18:58
  • @Andreas --98bad765-B-- should be matched --11111111-B-- should be matched --aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa-B-- should be matched etc... – brso05 Sep 12 '16 at 19:00
  • @Andreas I've showed you the way to use capture groups to get the exact letter out. If you have to have that exact prefix every time, then use this regex pattern instead: "--673b0e57-(\\w)--". – Jeutnarg Sep 12 '16 at 19:12
  • 1
    Interesting, so I would still need to check which letter it is (and do the appropriate action) but i would not have to do all the different regex thus saving some resources. – Kenny Steegmans Sep 12 '16 at 19:27
1

The reason for a Boundary Line with randomly generated text like that, is to ensure a Boundary Line can be generated that won't match the actual content. This also means that a line is only a Boundary Line if the Boundary Text (the randomly generated text) is the same on all the Boundary Lines.

Since your file must start with a Boundary Line, that first line establishes what the Boundary Text is, for this particular file. Other files may have different Boundary Text. So, you need to establish the Boundary Text, and only process valid Boundary Lines.

Here is example code for doing that.

String[] file = { "--673b0e57-A--",
                  "content here",
                  "--673b0e57-B--",
                  "content here",
                  "--673b0e57-C--",
                  "content here",
                  "--11111111-E--",
                  "content here",
                  "--673b0e57-F--",
                  "content here" };
Pattern boundaryPattern = Pattern.compile("--(.*?)-([ABCEFHIKZ])--");
String boundaryText = null, currentPart = null;
for (String line : file) {
    Matcher m = boundaryPattern.matcher(line);
    if (m.matches()) {
        if (boundaryText == null) {
            boundaryText = m.group(1);
            currentPart = m.group(2);
            continue;
        } else if (m.group(1).equals(boundaryText)) {
            if (m.group(2).compareTo(currentPart) <= 0)
                throw new IllegalStateException("Line marker out of sequence: " + m.group(2) +
                                                                  " must be > " + currentPart);
            currentPart = m.group(2);
            continue;
        }
    } else if (boundaryText == null) {
        throw new IllegalStateException("No line marker to be found while parsing file!");
    }
    System.out.println("Part " + currentPart + ": " + line);
}

Output

Part A: content here
Part B: content here
Part C: content here
Part C: --11111111-E--
Part C: content here
Part F: content here

As you can see, the invalid boundary line is treated as content, as it should be.

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