I would like to check if the condition "_Email" is met the first time and pass the result to the next if statement for another check and then again after that. If _Email is null, I want it to be an empty string for the last check.

Here is the code

    private string _Email;
    public string Email
    {
        get
        {
            if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(_Email))
            {
                _Email = GetEmailAddress();
            }
            else if (_Email.IsEmptyOrNull())
            {
                _Email = User.Current.Preference("Email");
            }
            else if (_Email.IsEmptyOrNull())
            {
                _Email = "";
            }
            return _Email;
        }
    }

I am not sure what I am doing wrong. Please let me know if you need any more info.

closed as off-topic by Servy, BradleyDotNET, David L, MethodMan, WelcomeOverflow Sep 12 '16 at 20:12

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example." – Servy, BradleyDotNET, David L, MethodMan, WelcomeOverflow
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  • What is this IsEmptyOrNull ? I assume you mean string.IsNullOrEmpty? You can't call a function on an object (_Email) if the object is null. You will get a NullReferenceException – dmeglio Sep 12 '16 at 19:27
  • 1
    @BradleyDotNET First, I think the "nonsense" part is what he's asking about (it's because he should be using if not else if) and second, where is their site effects? He's manipulating a backing property which doesn't seem unacceptable to me? – dmeglio Sep 12 '16 at 19:29
  • 1
    @BradleyDotNET no, it's not. It makes perfectly good sense, they should just be if, not else if's. If it's null, try to assign it. If it's still null, try to pull from somewhere else. if STILL null, set to empty. In no way are the conditions nonsense. They are MEANT to be the same. – Dispersia Sep 12 '16 at 19:30

you need to remove the else in your code because only the first if clause where the condition is met will be executed

and IsNullOrEmpty is a static method on the String class. Use String.IsNullOrEmpty instead of _Email.IsNullOrEmpty. (I get a compiler error when I try to do it like _Email.IsNullOrEmpty)

private string _Email;
public string Email
{
    get
    {
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(_Email))
        {
            _Email = GetEmailAddress();
        }
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(_Email))
        {
            _Email = User.Current.Preference("Email");
        }
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(_Email))
        {
            _Email = "";
        }
        return _Email;
    }
}

and I would recommend moving your code into an method called something like GetEmail to reduce your code in your property (it gets ugly in my opinion)

  • 3
    The conditions are not the same, since _Email can change between one if and the next. – zmbq Sep 12 '16 at 19:29
  • 1
    but if the first try doesn't return a string then maybe the second or the thirth. I think thats the idea? – NtFreX Sep 12 '16 at 19:29

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