14

I am trying to create the following query using knex:

SELECT * FROM users group by users.location having users.photo is not null

as follows:

knex("users").groupBy("users.location").having("users.photo", "IS NOT", "Null")

I am getting the following error on this:

The operator IS NOT is not permitted

I've gone through their documentation and couldn't find anything useful.

3 Answers 3

39

Have you tried:

knex("users").whereNotNull("photo").groupBy("location")

3
  • 1
    I haven't tried but shouldn't having clause be used here? Sep 13, 2016 at 9:35
  • 2
    @aitchkhan you can chain the commands. For example this: knex('table').where({"something":"else"}).whereNull("one_column").whereNotNull("some_column") would create query select * from "table" where "something" = 'else' and "one_column" is null and "some_column" is not null. You can play around with the API here: michaelavila.com/knex-querylab
    – Katie
    Jun 20, 2019 at 23:13
  • Okay, I was not expecting this. Intresting
    – aitchkhan
    Jun 23, 2019 at 8:01
8

The docs have the answers. There is whereNull, whereNotNull, havingNull, havingNotNull and so on.

From the DOCS:

havingNull — .havingNull(column)
Adds a havingNull clause to the query.

knex.select('*').from('users').havingNull('email')

Outputs:

select * from `users` having `email` is null

havingNotNull — .havingNotNull(column)
Adds a havingNotNull clause to the query.

knex.select('*').from('users').havingNotNull('email')

Outputs:

select * from `users` having `email` is not null

Give it a try using the knex query lab: http://michaelavila.com/knex-querylab/

2

According to the docs, .havingRaw is what you need:

knex("users").groupBy("users.location").havingRaw("users.photo IS NOT ?", [null]);

On the other hand, do a knex.raw at once unless there is any remaining advantage using the builder on this specific case.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.