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I'm using entity framework to setup a table using fluent-api configuration:

Property(g => g.DateTime).IsRequired().HasColumnType("datetime2").HasPrecision(0);

The table does indeed get created successfully:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Foo] (
   [DateTime]     DATETIME2 (0)  NOT NULL,
);

The precision of the datetime2 column has been set to 0 as you can see. I thus expect the retrieved date-time values to not include milliseconds at all, aka dates should look like '13 March 2016 18:35:37.0000'. However the retrieved dates always include milliseconds. Here's the code I'm using:

var dbcontext = new ApplicationDbContext(); //foo table is empty
dbcontext.Foo.Add(new Entry { DateTime = DateTime.Now });
dbcontext.SaveChanges();
var date = dbcontext.Foo.First().DateTime; //this should be identical to DateTime.Now above except for milliseconds which should be set to zero right?

How can I achieve the desired effect without resorting to zeroing-out milliseconds manually (via C# code either before insertion or after retrieval)?

  • So you're expecting EF to handle the truncation of the local object? – Rowland Shaw Sep 13 '16 at 12:25
  • 3
    In the code you've given, it's not clear that it's actually going to retrieve anything from the database... if you start a new context then really, really fetch, does it still have milliseconds? What's the value, if so? – Jon Skeet Sep 13 '16 at 12:43
  • Please see "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not"! – Andreas Niedermair Sep 13 '16 at 13:10
  • @RowlandShaw I guess my question boils down to what does precision=0 really do? By reading the specs I get the impression that it's all about dropping milliseconds completely. I'll be happy to stand corrected of course. – XDS Sep 13 '16 at 17:04
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    What do you see in the database itself? – Jon Skeet Sep 13 '16 at 17:05
1

If you need just date and time without any milliseconds, use smalldatetime MS SQL type instead. It has accuracy of 1 seconds.

If for some reason you want to have datetime2 in the database, there's no automatic way you can achieve desired behavior. You can create a (calculated) property MyDateTimeWithoutMs that get and set the correct value for the database connected property.

    internal DateTime databaseDateTime { get; set; }
    public DateTime MyDateTimeWithoutMs 
    {
        get
        {
            return databaseDateTime.DateTimeWithoutMs();
        }
        set
        {
            databaseDateTime= value.ToDateTimeWithoutMs();
        }
    }

In your model mapping add ignore for calculated property and map the database property to the actual column name.

public class EntryMap : EntityTypeConfiguration<Entry >
{
    public Entry Map()
    {
        Property(t => t.databaseDateTime)
            .HasColumnName("DateTime");
        Ignore(t => t.MyDateTimeWithoutMs );
  • +1 Thanks for tuning in Sergey. I find your approach pretty elegant. I got more insight than I bargained for - I give you that! I was aware of 'smalldatetime' but it doesn't support the date-range that datetime2 supports so I thought to give datetime2 a shot first. Thanks again! – XDS Sep 13 '16 at 17:07
1

Hats off to @JonSkeet who tipped me off as to what was amiss. Turns out that the first dbcontext I instantiated had some sort of caching going on which in turn was causing the date-time value provided to be returned as-is with its milliseconds component intact (go figure ...). One way to go about this, in order to get the desired behavior is to re-instantiate a db-context and start on a tabula-rasa basis to guarantee that no cached values will be return on datetime:

var dbcontext = new ApplicationDbContext(); //foo table is empty
dbcontext.Foo.Add(new Entry { DateTime = DateTime.Now });
dbcontext.SaveChanges();

var dbcon2 = new ApplicationDbContext(); //vital
var date = dbcon2.Foo.First().DateTime;

Alternatively you may use .Entry().Reload() which has the benefit that it doesn't need a new db-context to be instantiated:

var dbcontext = new ApplicationDbContext(); //foo table is empty
var entry = new Entry { DateTime = DateTime.Now };
dbcontext.Foo.Add();
dbcontext.SaveChanges();
dbcontext.Entry(entry).Reload(); //doesnt suffer from the quirks of dbcontext.Gigs.First()

P.S.: Last but not least if you are using this code in a unit-test project make sure to rebuild the project before giving it a go (at least that's what I had to do to make things work in my project)

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