5

I considered the C++11-based enum bitset introduced here. I came up with some sample program:

#include <bitset>
#include <type_traits>
#include <limits>

template <typename TENUM>
class FlagSet {

private:
  using TUNDER = typename std::underlying_type<TENUM>::type;
  std::bitset<std::numeric_limits<TUNDER>::max()> m_flags;

public:
  FlagSet() = default;

  FlagSet(const FlagSet& other) = default;
};

enum class Test
{
  FIRST,
  SECOND
};


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  FlagSet<Test> testFlags;
  return 0;
}

The program compiles just fine using clang++ (clang version 3.8.1 (tags/RELEASE_381/final)) via clang++ -std=c++11 -o main main.cc. However, if I use g++ (g++ (GCC) 6.2.1 20160830) via g++ -std=c++11 -o main main.cc instead, the compiler eventually exhausts system memory. Is this an issue with g++ or is this code somehow not compliant with the standard?

  • 2
    std::bitset<std::numeric_limits<TUNDER>::max()> That's one big bitset. – Borgleader Sep 13 '16 at 12:27
  • 2
    I wonder if g++ and clang use a different underlying type. – NathanOliver Sep 13 '16 at 12:28
  • @NathanOliver AFAIK the default underlying type for an enum class is 32 bit int? (Or wtv the default is there is one specified by the standard because you can forward declare an enum class as opposed to regular enums that cannot be) – Borgleader Sep 13 '16 at 12:30
  • @Borgleader AFAIK you are correct. I just wonder if that could be the difference. Unless g++ just can't handle a std::bitset<std::numeric_limits<int>::max()>. – NathanOliver Sep 13 '16 at 12:31
  • Which looks like it is the case. Coliru gives a timeout if main is just std::bitset<std::numeric_limits<int>::max()>foo;. – NathanOliver Sep 13 '16 at 12:33
5

std::bitset<std::numeric_limits<TUNDER>::max()> is 256 MiB in size (assuming 32-bit int). It's great that clang successfully compiles it, but it's not particularly surprising that gcc runs out of memory.

If you're intending to use the enumerators as bitset indices you'll have to pass the largest enumerator in as a separate template parameter; there is as yet (Max and min values in a C++ enum) no way to find the range of an enumeration.

Example:

template <typename TENUM, TENUM MAX>
class FlagSet {

private:
  std::bitset<MAX + 1> m_flags;

public:
  FlagSet() = default;

  FlagSet(const FlagSet& other) = default;
};

enum class Test
{
  FIRST,
  SECOND,
  MAX = SECOND
};

FlagSet<Test, Test::MAX> testFlags;
  • Or maybe OP expected max() to return the highest value in the enum, that was my guess. Either using the max value of the underlying type is, overzealous to say the least. – Borgleader Sep 13 '16 at 12:36
  • Well, I was just blindly copying from here: stackoverflow.com/a/31906371/1255016 I guess the answer should be edited... – hfhc2 Sep 13 '16 at 12:37
  • @hfhc2 ah... that answer is using a non-class enum, so it'll have underlying type char; so while the space is still wasteful (128 or 256 bits, most likely) it won't crash the compiler. – ecatmur Sep 13 '16 at 12:40
  • 1
    @ecatmur Ok, then a citation that an enum is "as small as possible" even in C++11. I am aware of no such guarantee. This could be because it does not exist, or because I am simply unaware of it. Hence a request for citation! – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Sep 13 '16 at 13:32
  • 2
    @Yakk sorry, you're totally right; the sole guarantee ([dcl.enum]/7) is that it should be no larger than int if it fits in int; the actual size is implementation-defined. Indeed it looks like both the x86 and Windows ABI use int for non-fixed enums that fit in int. – ecatmur Sep 13 '16 at 13:51

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