5

I have a basic class:

export default class Foo extends Component{
 constructor(props){}
 woop(){
  somethingimportanthappening..
 }
}

in the other component I import it like this:

import Foo from './Foo'
export default class Component2 extends Component{
 constructor(props){}

 randomfunction(){
   Foo.woop() // FAILS
 }
}

How can I call the function "woop" from the other component (Component2)? Foo.woop() isn't working ..

2
  • OK, blame me for being old fashioned, if you will, but I've not played around with new ES6 stuff, so I'm not totally clear what this does. Yet, I think you're exporting a class Foo and woop() is an instance method. Hence, shouldn't you do foo = new Foo(); foo.woop()?
    – VLAZ
    Sep 13, 2016 at 12:31
  • 1
    Please see "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not"!
    – user57508
    Sep 13, 2016 at 13:10

3 Answers 3

6

In React a component have an independent function, so in Foo component you define it, something like

export default class Foo extends Component{
  constructor(props){}
  woop(){
    somethingimportanthappening..
  }
  render() {
    <div>Class Foo</div>
  }
}

and when you want to use Foo component, you just import and use

<Foo />

and if you want to use a function in Foo component, you can define a reference to Foo

<Foo ref="foo" />

then use it by

import Foo from './Foo'
export default class Component2 extends Component{
  constructor(props){}

  randomfunction(){
    this.refs.foo.woop();
  }

  render() {
    return <Foo ref="foo" />
  }
}
3
  • Works perfectly for me :)
    – RRikesh
    Sep 14, 2016 at 5:10
  • True, this works quite well, but only with a parental relationship.. what if there isn't any?
    – dv3
    Sep 14, 2016 at 6:47
  • @dv3 if you inherit a class, you can call parent function through super.methodName(), maybe works :D Sep 16, 2016 at 3:24
1

Since woop is not a static function you cannot Foo.woop()

You should instantiate a Foo instance as follows:

import Foo from './Foo'

export default class Component2 extends Component{
    private fooInstance: Foo;

    constructor(props){
      this.fooInstance = new Foo(props);
    }

    useFoo(){
      this.fooInstance.woop();
    }
}

Let me know if something is unclear :)

7
  • makes sense :) but it's throwing unexpected token on the 'private fooInstance: Foo;' line... confused
    – dv3
    Sep 13, 2016 at 12:38
  • Try it without the private, it is just a recommendation. (assuming the unexpected token is the private and not something about the : Foo type) Sep 13, 2016 at 12:38
  • 'Foo is not a constructor'... lol is this something react-native specific?
    – dv3
    Sep 13, 2016 at 12:40
  • updated my answer, your Foo class should have a constructor for instantiating a new instance of it Sep 13, 2016 at 12:42
  • Thanks but it already had a constructor in it.. didn't really change it..
    – dv3
    Sep 13, 2016 at 12:45
0

Creating an instance of a class to call a function seems wrong to me. I'm not sure but its like calling a function from different Activity inside another Activity in Android: You can't and mustn't do that.

Imo, the proper way to call a function of a different class to pass the function callback as props (if there is a parental relation). If there isn't any, triggering Events using react-native-simple-events is fairly simple.

Alternatively, you can use Redux which makes your app more robust. This may change and improve your overall app logic.

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