16

I have an animation where the range of the data varies a lot. I would like to have a colorbar which tracks the max and the min of the data (i.e. I would like it not to be fixed). The question is how to do this.

Ideally I would like the colorbar to be on its own axis.

I have tried the following four things

1. Naive approach

The problem: A new colorbar is plottet for each frame

#!/usr/bin/env python
"""
An animated image
"""
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.animation as animation

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)


def f(x, y):
    return np.exp(x) + np.sin(y)

x = np.linspace(0, 1, 120)
y = np.linspace(0, 2 * np.pi, 100).reshape(-1, 1)

frames = []

for i in range(10):
    x       += 1
    curVals  = f(x, y)
    vmax     = np.max(curVals)
    vmin     = np.min(curVals)
    levels   = np.linspace(vmin, vmax, 200, endpoint = True)
    frame    = ax.contourf(curVals, vmax=vmax, vmin=vmin, levels=levels)
    cbar     = fig.colorbar(frame)
    frames.append(frame.collections)

ani = animation.ArtistAnimation(fig, frames, blit=False)

plt.show()

2. Adding to the images

Changing the for loop above to

initFrame = ax.contourf(f(x,y)) 
cbar      = fig.colorbar(initFrame)
for i in range(10):
    x       += 1
    curVals  = f(x, y)
    vmax     = np.max(curVals)      
    vmin     = np.min(curVals)      
    levels   = np.linspace(vmin, vmax, 200, endpoint = True)
    frame    = ax.contourf(curVals, vmax=vmax, vmin=vmin, levels=levels)
    cbar.set_clim(vmin = vmin, vmax = vmax)
    cbar.draw_all()
    frames.append(frame.collections + [cbar])

The problem: This raises

AttributeError: 'Colorbar' object has no attribute 'set_visible'

3. Plotting on its own axis

The problem: The colorbar is not updated.

 #!/usr/bin/env python
 """
 An animated image
 """
 import numpy as np
 import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
 import matplotlib.animation as animation

 fig = plt.figure()
 ax1 = fig.add_subplot(121)
 ax2 = fig.add_subplot(122)


 def f(x, y):
     return np.exp(x) + np.sin(y)

 x = np.linspace(0, 1, 120)
 y = np.linspace(0, 2 * np.pi, 100).reshape(-1, 1)

 frames = []

 for i in range(10):
     x       += 1
     curVals  = f(x, y)
     vmax     = np.max(curVals)
     vmin     = np.min(curVals)
     levels   = np.linspace(vmin, vmax, 200, endpoint = True)
     frame    = ax1.contourf(curVals, vmax=vmax, vmin=vmin, levels=levels)
     cbar     = fig.colorbar(frame, cax=ax2) # Colorbar does not update
     frames.append(frame.collections)

 ani = animation.ArtistAnimation(fig, frames, blit=False)

 plt.show()

A combination of 2. and 4.

The problem: The colorbar is constant.

A similar question is posted here, but it looks like the OP is satisfied with a fixed colorbar.

2
  • How tied are you to an ArtistAnimation? I'm not sure how to do it that way, but I could give you an example using a FuncAnimation instead...
    – Ajean
    Sep 20, 2016 at 0:56
  • As far as I remember, I started using ArtistAnimation as I had problems animating some text acting as titles with FuncAnimation. Other than that, I am open to switch back to FuncAnimation. An example would be appreciated :)
    – Løiten
    Sep 20, 2016 at 5:41

1 Answer 1

22
+50

While I'm not sure how to do this specifically using an ArtistAnimation, using a FuncAnimation is fairly straightforward. If I make the following modifications to your "naive" version 1 it works.

Modified Version 1

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.animation as animation
from mpl_toolkits.axes_grid1 import make_axes_locatable

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

# I like to position my colorbars this way, but you don't have to
div = make_axes_locatable(ax)
cax = div.append_axes('right', '5%', '5%')

def f(x, y):
    return np.exp(x) + np.sin(y)

x = np.linspace(0, 1, 120)
y = np.linspace(0, 2 * np.pi, 100).reshape(-1, 1)

frames = []
for i in range(10):
    x       += 1
    curVals  = f(x, y)
    frames.append(curVals)

cv0 = frames[0]
cf = ax.contourf(cv0, 200)
cb = fig.colorbar(cf, cax=cax)
tx = ax.set_title('Frame 0')

def animate(i):
    arr = frames[i]
    vmax     = np.max(arr)
    vmin     = np.min(arr)
    levels   = np.linspace(vmin, vmax, 200, endpoint = True)
    cf = ax.contourf(arr, vmax=vmax, vmin=vmin, levels=levels)
    cax.cla()
    fig.colorbar(cf, cax=cax)
    tx.set_text('Frame {0}'.format(i))

ani = animation.FuncAnimation(fig, animate, frames=10)

plt.show()

The main difference is that I do the levels calculations and contouring in a function instead of creating a list of artists. The colorbar works because you can clear the axes from the previous frame and redo it every frame.

Doing this redo is necessary when using contour or contourf, because you can't just dynamically change the data. However, as you have plotted so many contour levels and the result looks smooth, I think you may be better off using imshow instead - it means you can actually just use the same artist and change the data, and the colorbar updates itself automatically. It's also much faster!

Better Version

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.animation as animation
from mpl_toolkits.axes_grid1 import make_axes_locatable

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

# I like to position my colorbars this way, but you don't have to
div = make_axes_locatable(ax)
cax = div.append_axes('right', '5%', '5%')

def f(x, y):
    return np.exp(x) + np.sin(y)

x = np.linspace(0, 1, 120)
y = np.linspace(0, 2 * np.pi, 100).reshape(-1, 1)

# This is now a list of arrays rather than a list of artists
frames = []
for i in range(10):
    x       += 1
    curVals  = f(x, y)
    frames.append(curVals)

cv0 = frames[0]
im = ax.imshow(cv0, origin='lower') # Here make an AxesImage rather than contour
cb = fig.colorbar(im, cax=cax)
tx = ax.set_title('Frame 0')

def animate(i):
    arr = frames[i]
    vmax     = np.max(arr)
    vmin     = np.min(arr)
    im.set_data(arr)
    im.set_clim(vmin, vmax)
    tx.set_text('Frame {0}'.format(i))
    # In this version you don't have to do anything to the colorbar,
    # it updates itself when the mappable it watches (im) changes

ani = animation.FuncAnimation(fig, animate, frames=10)

plt.show()
3
  • Thanks, this solved my problem. There are no problems with overlapping text in this example either (as was the reason why I changed to ArtistAnimation). Using imshow would of course be preferable, but I'm stuck with contourf in my case due to a non-rectangular grid.
    – Løiten
    Sep 20, 2016 at 19:32
  • @Ajean, would you know how to do the same with logarithmic color scale (norm=matplotlib.colors.LogNorm()) and fixed vmin/vmax values (fixed colorbar)?
    – TheoryX
    Nov 27, 2019 at 14:04
  • @TheoryX I believe that if you want the LogNorm (and hence the colormapping) to have a fixed vmin and vmax, all you need to do is pass it in to the initial call to imshow, then don't adjust the clim inside the animate function. That results in a fixed colorbar though, so not quite what this particular question was after.
    – Ajean
    Dec 9, 2019 at 21:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.