1

I'm trying to make several types that can call the same function to perform a few common operations, without needing to duplicate them for each type. Let's call those types handlers.

The idea is that I can have a CreateHandler, a ListHandler, etc, and a function that will do default operations for those handlers, let's say, set the "Success" field to true and call the "Execute" function on the handler. I keep those examples simple to make them easy to read, but in real case there would be way more common operations.

I've tried 3 different approaches, to no avail: using a base type and embed it, using an interface implemented by types and using an empty interface as parameter.

Base type embedded

package main

import "fmt"

type BaseHandler struct {
  Success bool
}

func ( handler *BaseHandler ) Init() {
  handler.Success = true
  handler.Execute()
}

func ( handler *BaseHandler ) Execute() {
}



// I will have many different types doing the same kind of work,
// with their own specific fields and functions
type MyHandler struct {
  BaseHandler
  Message string
}

func ( handler *MyHandler ) Execute() {
  fmt.Println( "I'm never called" )
}

func main() {
  handler := MyHandler{}
  handler.Init()
}

This won't work because the Execute function called is the one from BaseHandler, not from MyHandler. Same problem if the Init method has no receiver and takes a *BaseHandler as parameter.

interface implemented by types

package main

import "fmt"

type BaseHandler interface {
  Execute()
}

func Init( handler BaseHandler ) {
  handler.Success = true
  handler.Execute()
}

type MyHandler struct {
  Success bool
  Message string
}

func ( handler *MyHandler ) Execute() {
  fmt.Println( "I'm never called" )
}

func main() {
  handler := MyHandler{}
  Init( handler )
}

This will fail to compile because of first line of Init function, saying that the BaseHandler interface does not have a Success field.

empty interface as parameter

package main

import "fmt"

func Init( handler interface{} ) {
  handler.Success = true
  handler.Execute()
}


type MyHandler struct {
  Success bool
  Message string
}

func ( handler *MyHandler ) Execute() {
  fmt.Println( "I'm never called" )
}

func main() {
  handler := MyHandler{}
  Init( handler )
}

This will fail to compile on first line of Init saying that interface{} has no Success field. I can't do type assertion there, because it would mean listing all the types which can go there, and there may be a lot.

Question

So here is my question: how do you write shared code, that can set fields and call functions from similar types?

  • From your code I can't see why handler.Success = true isn't inside BaseHandler's Execute. – Ainar-G Sep 13 '16 at 16:55
  • You could make the interface BaseHandler also have a SetSuccess() if it has to be able to do that as well. – algrebe Sep 13 '16 at 16:56
  • @Ainar-G : It could. But it's half the job, it still won't call Handler's Execute. – Olivier El Mekki Sep 13 '16 at 16:57
  • 1
    @OlivierElMekki I hope this works. Dont hate on the struct name lol :P play.golang.org/p/jflmT-LpJy – algrebe Sep 13 '16 at 17:09
  • 1
    @OlivierElMekki no problem. I've kept mine there just for an alternate solution. – algrebe Sep 13 '16 at 17:17
1

handler.Success = true feels like it belongs within Execute. Thus, you could define an interface and make Init a function on this interface, while embedding the interface in "children":

type Handler interface {
    Execute()
}

func Init(handler Handler) {
    handler.Execute()
}

type BaseHandler struct {
    Success bool
}

func (handler *BaseHandler) Execute() {
    handler.Success = true
    fmt.Println("success: true")
}

type MyHandler struct {
    Handler
    Message string
}

func (handler *MyHandler) Execute() {
    fmt.Println("I do some work before")
    handler.Handler.Execute()
    fmt.Println("I do some work after")
}

func main() {
    handler := &MyHandler{&BaseHandler{}, "foo"}
    Init(handler)
}

Playground: https://play.golang.org/p/iDo2BQ6N5D.

1

Seems like you need init to be able to set success and execute something.

TL;DR Heres the playground link https://play.golang.org/p/jflmT-LpJy

So, using interfaces, I'd create the following

type SuccessableExecutable interface {
    SetSuccess()
    Execute()
}

func Init(se SuccessableExecutable) {
    se.SetSuccess()
    se.Execute()
}

Now, you'd like SetSuccess to be reusable across the many types. For this I'd create a struct which could be embedded in all those types

type Successable struct {
    success bool
}

func (s *Successable) SetSuccess() {
    s.success = True
}

Embedding this automatically gives you access to SetSuccess so any struct that has the Execute and embeds this, will also be a SuccessableExecutable.

Putting it together, we have

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

type Successable struct {
    success bool
}

func (s *Successable) SetSuccess() {
    s.success = true
}

type SuccessableExecutable interface {
    SetSuccess()
    Execute()
}

type BaseHandler struct {
    Message string
    Successable
}

func (b *BaseHandler) Execute() {
    fmt.Printf("%s\n", b.Message);
}

func Init(se SuccessableExecutable) {
    se.SetSuccess()
    se.Execute()
}

func main() {
        bh := &BaseHandler{ Message: "hello" }
        fmt.Printf("%+v\n", bh)
        Init(bh)
        fmt.Printf("%+v\n", bh)
}
  • Both answers solve my problem, sorry StackOverflow does not allow to set several good answers! – Olivier El Mekki Sep 13 '16 at 17:17
1

Try embedding an interface:

package main

import "fmt"

type BaseHandler struct {
    Success  bool
    Executer // embedded, so BaseHandler inherits the method
}

type Executer interface {
    Execute()
}

func (h *BaseHandler) Init() {
    h.Success = true
    h.Execute()
}

// I will have many different types doing the same kind of work,
// with their own specific fields and functions
type StringHandler struct {
    Message string
}

func (h *StringHandler) Execute() {
    fmt.Println(h.Message)
}

type IntHandler struct {
    Value int
}

func (h *IntHandler) Execute() {
    fmt.Println(h.Value)
}

func main() {
    stringHandler := BaseHandler{Executer: &StringHandler{"Hello"}}
    intHandler := BaseHandler{Executer: &IntHandler{42}}
    DoInit(stringHandler)
    DoInit(intHandler)
}

// These are just to prove you can pass it around as the struct
func DoInit(h BaseHandler) {
    h.Init()
}

https://play.golang.org/p/aGZMnuoBh_

This lets Success be tracked within the base handler, but the actual implementation of Execute can be dynamically filled by whatever type you want (so long as it fulfills that interface).

Personally, I like to take it another step further, and pass around the interface-embedding-struct as another interface (either the same as embedded, since a structure automatically implements all interfaces that it embeds, or as another interface with other or additional methods).

Also, a related word of caution: I always recommend passing pointers into interfaces when you're doing something like this. It's an interesting quirk of Go that an interface storing a pointer can access both the pointer and value receiver methods of that stored type, but an interface storing a value directly (even though the interface will in most cases still store a pointer to the value) can only access the value receiver methods. For example: https://play.golang.org/p/6qOYhol_y_

  • Thanks! I see there are a lot of different ways for the same solution :) Thanks for the note on pointer and interfaces, it's indeed something I've been bitten a lot by. – Olivier El Mekki Sep 17 '16 at 18:20

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