5

I have a set of test DLL's that I'm running from a powershell script that calls OpenCover.Console.exe via the Start-Process command.

I have the -returntargetcode flag set

After execution I check $lastexitcode and $?. They return 1 and True respectively all the time. Even when tests are failing.

Shouldn't $lastexitcode be 0 when all tests pass and 1 when they fail?

11

By default, Start-Process is asynchronous, so it doesn't wait for your process to exit. If you want your command-line tool to run synchronously, drop the Start-Process and invoke the command directly. That's the only way it will set $LASTEXITCODE. For example, causing CMD.exe to exit with a 2:

cmd /c exit 2
$LASTEXITCODE

You can make Start-Process synchronous by adding the -Wait flag, but it still wont' set $LASTEXITCODE. To get the ExitCode from Start-Process you add -PassThru to your Start-Process, which then outputs a [System.Diagnostics.Process] object which you can use to monitor the process, and (eventually) get access to its ExitCode property. Here's an example that should help:

$p = Start-Process "cmd" -ArgumentList "/c exit 2" -PassThru -Wait
$p.ExitCode

Of course the advantage of this approach is you don't need to wait for the process, but later when it exits you have the information about it's run in $p.

1
  • It was the -PassThru that fixed it for me! Thanks
    – lucas
    Sep 14 '16 at 18:24
3

When executing a GUI application, dropping the Start-Process does not help, as PowerShell does not wait for GUI application to complete, when executing them directly this way. So $LASTEXITCODE is not set.

Piping the (non existing) GUI application output helps, as it makes PowerShell to wait for the application to complete.

notepad.exe | Out-Null
echo $LASTEXITCODE

Note that "GUI application" does not necessarily mean that the application has windows. Whether an application is GUI or console is a flag in .exe file header.


Start-Process -PassThru -Wait as suggested in the answer by @Burt_Harris works too in this case, it's just a bit mode complicated.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.