38

I'm new to Swift and I was reading the manual when I came across escaping closures. I didn't get the manual's description at all. Could someone please explain to me what escaping closures are in Swift in simple terms.

  • 3
    To quote from the manual, “A closure is said to escape a function when the closure is passed as an argument to the function, but is called after the function returns.” So, if the closure is called synchronously, it's non-escaping. An example might be an enumeration closure, or the map, filter, etc. functional methods. If it's called asynchronously (i.e. later), it's escaping. The most common example of escaping closure would be the completion handler for some slow asynchronous task, like a network request. – Rob Sep 15 '16 at 6:26
  • If you think my answer answers your question, please consider accepting by clicking on that checkmark. – Sweeper Oct 5 '16 at 7:12
65

Consider this class:

class A {
    var closure: (() -> Void)?
    func someMethod(closure: () -> Void) {
        self.closure = closure
    }
}

someMethod assigns the closure passed in, to a property in the class.

Now here comes another class:

class B {
    var number = 0
    var a: A = A()
    func anotherMethod() {
        a.someMethod { self.number = 10 }
    }
}

If I call anotherMethod, the closure { self.number = 10 } will be stored in the instance of A. Since self is captured in the closure, the instance of A will also hold a strong reference to it.

That's basically an example of an escaped closure!

You are probably wondering, "what? So where did the closure escaped from, and to?"

The closure escapes from the scope of the method, to the scope of the class. And it can be called later, even on another thread! This could cause problems if not handled properly.

To avoid accidentally escaping closures and causing retain cycles and other problems, use the @noescape attribute:

class A {
    var closure: (() -> Void)?
    func someMethod(@noescape closure: () -> Void) {
    }
}

Now if you try to write self.closure = closure, it doesn't compile!

Update:

In Swift 3, all closure parameters cannot escape by default. You must add the @escaping attribute in order to make the closure be able to escape from the current scope. This adds a lot more safety to your code!

class A {
    var closure: (() -> Void)?
    func someMethod(closure: @escaping () -> Void) {
    }
}
  • noescape is the default behaviour in Swift 3 and deprecated. What you now need to do is use escaping. func someMethod(closure: @escaping () -> Void) – bandejapaisa Sep 21 '16 at 19:05
  • 1
    @bandejapaisa Thanks for the information! Answer edited! – Sweeper Sep 21 '16 at 19:07
  • @bandejapaisa You say "@noescape" has been deprecated, but I have recently run into a situation that makes me think it is only semi-deprecated. Please take a look at this and let me know if I've made some mistake: stackoverflow.com/questions/41917413/… – RenniePet Jan 30 '17 at 8:28
  • @noescape is the implicit behaviour. The keyword is deprecated, not completely removed yet, but the behaviour you get by writing it or not, is that your closure does NOT escape from the scope of the method. Deprecated means it's still available to use, but it will be removed in a future version. Hence why you can still use it, and why you think it's 'semi deprecated' – bandejapaisa Jan 31 '17 at 13:13
  • 1
    From your answer, I still didn't understand the difference - what is each type good for. It would be nicer if you provided a real-world example. The other two answers are much easier to understand. – Honza Kalfus Aug 11 '17 at 7:32
40

I am going in a more simpler way.

Consider this example:

func testFunctionWithNonescapingClosure(closure:() -> Void) {
        closure()
}

The above is a non-escaping closure because the closure is invoked before the method returns.

Consider the same example with an asynchoronous operation:

func testFunctionWithEscapingClosure(closure:@escaping () -> Void) {
      DispatchQueue.main.async {
           closure()
      }
 }

The above example contains an escaping closure because the closure invocation may happen after the function returns due to the asynchronous operation.

 var completionHandlers: [() -> Void] = []
 func testFunctionWithEscapingClosure(closure: @escaping () -> Void) {
      completionHandlers.append(closure)
 }

In the above case you can easily realize the closure is moving outside body of the function so it needs to be an escaping closure.

Escaping and non escaping closure were added for compiler optimization in Swift 3. You can search for the advantages of nonescaping closure.

  • It would be good to also add to this good answer what advantages of the nonescaping closure there are and examples when you can need it. – Nik Kov Jul 28 '17 at 16:22
14

I find this website very helpful on that matter Simple explanation would be:

If a closure is passed as an argument to a function and it is invoked after the function returns, the closure is escaping.

Read more at the link I passed above! :)

3

Swift 4.1

From Language Reference: Attributes of The Swift Programming Language (Swift 4.1)

Apple explains the attribute escaping clearly.

Apply this attribute to a parameter’s type in a method or function declaration to indicate that the parameter’s value can be stored for later execution. This means that the value is allowed to outlive the lifetime of the call. Function type parameters with the escaping type attribute require explicit use of self. for properties or methods. For an example of how to use the escaping attribute, see Escaping Closures

var completionHandlers: [() -> Void] = []
func someFunctionWithEscapingClosure(completionHandler: @escaping () -> Void) {
    completionHandlers.append(completionHandler)
}

The someFunctionWithEscapingClosure(_:) function takes a closure as its argument and adds it to an array that’s declared outside the function. If you didn’t mark the parameter of this function with @escaping, you would get a compile-time error.

A closure is said to escape a function when the closure is passed as an argument to the function, but is called after the function returns. When you declare a function that takes a closure as one of its parameters, you can write @escaping before the parameter’s type to indicate that the closure is allowed to escape.

1

By default the closures are non escaping. For simple understanding you can consider non_escaping closures as local closure(just like local variables) and escaping as global closure (just like global variables). It means once we come out from the method body the scope of the non_escaping closure is lost. But in the case of escaping closure, the memory retained the closure int the memory.

***Simply we use escaping closure when we call the closure inside any async task in the method, or method returns before calling the closure.

Non_escaping closure: -

func add(num1: Int, num2: Int, completion: ((Int) -> (Void))) -> Int {
    DispatchQueue.global(qos: .background).async {
        print("Background")
        completion(num1 + num2) // Error: Closure use of non-escaping parameter 'completion' may allow it to escape
    }
    return num1
}

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()
    let ans = add(num1: 12, num2: 22, completion: { (number) in
        print("Inside Closure")
        print(number)
    })
    print("Ans = \(ans)")
    initialSetup()
}

Since it is non_escaping closure its scope will be lost once we come out the from the 'add' method. completion(num1 + num2) will never call.

Escaping closure:-

func add(num1: Int, num2: Int, completion: @escaping((Int) -> (Void))) -> Int {
    DispatchQueue.global(qos: .background).async {
        print("Background")
        completion(num1 + num2)
    }
    return num1
}

Even if the method return (i.e., we come out of the method scope) the closure will be called.enter code here

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