21

My Android 4+ app is connected to a custom web service that is used to sync data every few minutes. To make sure, that the online data is always up to date, I want to trigger the sync when ever the app is closed / send to background.

Under iOS this is quite easy:

  • Listen to applicationDidEnterBackground: in the AppDelegate
  • Use beginBackgroundTaskWithName: to start you long running background task and to avoid being suspended while the task is still running

How to do this on Android?

First problem is, that there is nothing equivalent to applicationDidEnterBackground:. All solution I found so far propose to use the main Activities onPause() method. However this called any time the main Activity is paused, which is also the case when another Activity is started within the app. The is true for the onActivityPaused() method from ActivityLifecycleCallbacks interface.

So, how to detect that the app (not just an Activity) is closed or send to the background?

Second problem is, that I did not find any information on how to run background task. All solutions point to simply start an AsyncTask, but is this really the correct solution?

AsyncTask will start a new task, but will this task also run, when the app is closed/inactive? What do I have to do, to prevent the app and the task from being suspended after a few seconds? How can I make sure, that the task can complete, before the app is completely suspended?

4
18

The following code will help you to post your contents when your app is closed or in the background:

import android.app.Service;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.os.Binder;
import android.os.Handler;
import android.os.IBinder;
import android.widget.Toast;

public class SendDataService extends Service {
    private final LocalBinder mBinder = new LocalBinder();
    protected Handler handler;
    protected Toast mToast;
 
    public class LocalBinder extends Binder {
        public SendDataService getService() {
            return SendDataService .this;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public IBinder onBind(Intent intent) {
        return mBinder;
    }

    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();

    }

    @Override
    public void onDestroy() {
        super.onDestroy();
    }

    @Override
    public int onStartCommand(Intent intent, int flags, int startId) {
        handler = new Handler();
        handler.post(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() { 

// write your code to post content on server
            }
        });
        return android.app.Service.START_STICKY;
    }

}

More explanation of my code is:

Service runs in the background even if your application is in the background, but remember, it always runs on the main thread, because of which I created a separate thread to perform your background operations.

Service is started as a sticky one, as even if because of any reason your service got destroyed in the background it will automatically get restarted.

More details can be found here: https://developer.android.com/guide/components/services.html

And to check if your app is in the foreground/background, the following code will help:

  private boolean isAppOnForeground(Context context) {
    ActivityManager activityManager = (ActivityManager) context.getSystemService(Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE);
    List<RunningAppProcessInfo> appProcesses = activityManager.getRunningAppProcesses();
    if (appProcesses == null) {
      return false;
    }
    final String packageName = context.getPackageName();
    for (RunningAppProcessInfo appProcess : appProcesses) {
      if (appProcess.importance == RunningAppProcessInfo.IMPORTANCE_FOREGROUND && appProcess.processName.equals(packageName)) {
        return true;
      }
    }
    return false;
  }
}

// Use like this:
boolean foregroud = new ForegroundCheckTask().execute(context).get();

Happy Coding!!!!

4
  • 1
    Downvoted because just showing a code without an explanation, and expecting the original poster to automatically understand it, is not always how it happens. Will remove my downvote if you improve your answer. – Diti Sep 15 '16 at 9:39
  • 2
    Done! Thank you for having taken a bit of your time to make the answer more understandable to beginners! – Diti Sep 15 '16 at 9:47
  • you have used handler to do background work, after how much time will the handler get invoked for repeated network calls? – Kaveesh Kanwal Sep 15 '16 at 9:50
  • 1
    Thank you very much. A Service seems indeed to be a perfect solution for Problem Nr. 2. What about the first problem: How to properly detect that the app was paused/closed and not just an Activity? – Andrei Herford Sep 15 '16 at 10:27
8

The accepted answer is not correct.

Unfortunately, the author believes that posting a new Runnable task to the Handler() creates a separate thread - "I created a separate thread to perform your background operations" :

@Override
public int onStartCommand(Intent intent, int flags, int startId) {
    handler = new Handler();
    handler.post(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() { 
           // write your code to post content on server
        }
    });
    return android.app.Service.START_STICKY;
}

onStartCommand() callback is always called on the main thread, and the new Handler() is attached to the current thread (which is "main"). So the Runnable task is posted at the end of main thread queue.

To fix the issue and execute the Runnable in a really separate thread you can use AsyncTask as the simplest solution:

@Override
public int onStartCommand(Intent intent, int flags, int startId) {
    AsyncTask.execute(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            // ...
        }
    });
    return android.app.Service.START_STICKY;
}

Think yourself before you copy-paste anything ...

1
  • I think new Handler() creates a new thread or some default thread, but I assure you that the code running in new Handler() is not running on main thread. As I always get exception whenever I do ui work in new Handler runnable. – Taha Malik Sep 21 '20 at 7:52
3

You can use services for what you want to achieve. A service will keep on running in the background even when the activity component has been destroyed, provided you have not invoked stopService(..) or stopSelf() methods.

In the service you can make an Async network call, preferably using retrofit, and then you can update you local storage like Sqlite DB with the latest data fetched from your web service.

Here is the official link, you can just use an unbounded service for what you want to achieve.

2
  • Thank you very much. A Service seems indeed to be a perfect solution for Problem Nr. 2. What about the first problem: How to properly detect that the app was paused/closed and not just an Activity? – Andrei Herford Sep 15 '16 at 10:27
  • For that you can override activity life cycle methods like onPause() and onDestroy(). If your activity is the last item in the back stack and you press the android default back button, then onDestroy() gets called, and you exit from your app. – Kaveesh Kanwal Sep 15 '16 at 10:31
-2

For background operations, you can use WorkManager.

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