33

On my website, I'm constantly doing style="font-size: #ofpx;". However, I was wondering if there's a way to do it with scss so that, when I declare a class, it would also change the font size. For example:

<div class='col-lg-4 font-20'>whatever here</div>

and this would change my font-size to 20. If I did font-30, it would change my font-size to 30 and etc...

What I have so far:

.font-#{$fontsize} {
      font-size: $fontsize;
}
  • 11
    First: You're abusing CSS classes. Your classes shouldn't be named after the styles they impart, they should add semantic meaning to the elements. Second: Do you really have so many font sizes that you need this level of granularity? – meagar Sep 15 '16 at 19:04
  • There are a lot of different elements I wanna choose specifically the font-size ): – Gustavo Fulton Sep 15 '16 at 19:05
  • because scss needs to flatten into css before it is applied to the html, i don't think this is possible. you are essentially trying to make the decision at run-time rather than compile-time. with that said, i think you need to think long and hard about what you're trying to do from a design standpoint. do you really need arbitrarily sized font classes? that's contrary to the semantic purpose of a css class. if you need that much granularity in your classes, you probably aren't organizing your markup as well as you should. think about semantics, and consider classes like font-small. – Woodrow Barlow Sep 15 '16 at 19:06
  • Alright, Thanks guys! – Gustavo Fulton Sep 15 '16 at 19:08
  • 20 what? 30 what? – connexo Sep 15 '16 at 19:32
42

This can't be done for arbitrary sizes. The nature of SCSS is that is needs to be flattened down to CSS before it gets applied to the HTML. What you are asking for, however, is essentially to create rules at run-time rather than compile-time.

What you're asking for is also a code smell. It smells like your markup isn't semantic enough. The purpose of a CSS class is to group objects with similar characteristics, but you're using them instead to describe the styles they impart. I would suggest stepping back and reconsidering what it is that you really want.

You obviously have details of certain elements that are context-dependent. For example, maybe you are applying these rules to buttons when you want to make them smaller or larger than usual. You need to identify the scenarios in which the buttons change. Maybe they are 20% smaller if they are in a modal dialog? Then write your normal .button rules, and also create rules for .modal .button which make it smaller.

If you're positive that you want to define font-size for each element within the HTML (and sometimes there are good reasons for doing so), just continue using inline styles. The only reason inline styling is frowned upon is because it combines model and view logic in a way that harms reusability; however, what you are requesting does so in exactly the same way. This is what inline styles were made for. Don't re-invent the wheel.

With all of that said, you can use sass loops to automatically generate classes for integers within a range. For example:

/* warning: this is generally a bad idea */
@for $i from 1 through 100 {
  .font-#{$i} {
    font-size: #{$i}px;
  }
}

This is not a good idea. Pragmatically speaking it doesn't offer any advantages over just using inline styles and with large ranges your resulting file will be larger (which affects website load times).

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  • 1
    That was a really helpful answer. Thanks a lot and congrats for your knowledge :) – Gustavo Fulton Sep 15 '16 at 19:33
10

Just going to add, mixins are great, but if you want a util class (attach a class to an element, get that font-size applied to it, do a for-loop in SCSS like so..

@for $i from 1 through 4 {
    $fontsize: 10px * $i;
    .font-#{$i} { 
        font-size: $fontsize;
        }
}

compiles to

.font-1 {
  font-size: 10px;
}

.font-2 {
  font-size: 20px;
}

.font-3 {
  font-size: 30px;
}

.font-4 {
  font-size: 40px;
}

If you want the class to match the # of pixels...

@for $i from 1 through 4 {
    $base: 10;
    $fontsize: $base * $i;
    .font-#{$fontsize} { 
        font-size: $fontsize + 0px;
        }
}

Which compiles to

.font-10 {
  font-size: 10px;
}

.font-20 {
  font-size: 20px;
}

.font-30 {
  font-size: 30px;
}

.font-40 {
  font-size: 40px;
}

Codepen example.

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3

Of course, inline style tags are bad form. So yes, you should add some classes for font size, or just set font size on the elements you need to as you go. Up to you. If you want, you could use a mixin like so:

@mixin font-size($size) {
  font-size: $size;
}

.some-div { @include font-size(10px); }

But that's probably overkill unless you get a group of rules that usually go together.

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  • Yeah what I really wanted is to declare the font-size in the class description suck as class="font-20" – Gustavo Fulton Sep 15 '16 at 19:03
  • You don't need sass for that. The comments you are getting on the main question are good ones. I will echo their sentiment that you are probably going about this the wrong way. Put semantics first in your thinking and you'll be happier in the long run. – jmargolisvt Sep 15 '16 at 19:07
  • are you even saving any typing with this? – Brandito Sep 14 '18 at 0:52
1

Just for those of you who might stumble across this question in a more recent time and are new to FrontEnd Development.

What Woodrow Barlow said about using inline-styles instead of rule specific classes isn't quite an up-to-date opinion. For instance, Bootstrap has some of those and Tachyons is entirely built upon them. Actually this practice is called Atomic CSS or Functional CSS.

It's better explained by John Polacek in his CSS Tricks article: https://css-tricks.com/lets-define-exactly-atomic-css/

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0

You can use mixins like this

    @mixin font($fontsize) {
      font-size: $fontsize;
    }

    .box { 
        @include font(10px); 
    }
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