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I was originally using only a single random pivot given by

pivots = random.randrange(l,r)

Here l and r will be integers that define my range

I wanted to improve the run time by greatly increasing the likely hood that my pivot would be a good pivot by selecting the median of three random pivots. Below is the code I used and it caused my run time to increase by 20%-30%.

rr = random.randrange
pivots = [ rr(l,r) for i in range(3) ]
pivots.sort()

How do I implement the above to be much faster?

Edit: Entire code added below

import random

def quicksort(array, l=0, r=-1):
    # array is list to sort, array is going to be passed by reference, this is new to me, try not to suck
    # l is the left bound of the array to be acte on
    # r is the right bound of the array to act on

    if r == -1:
        r = len(array)

    # base case
    if r-l <= 1:
        return

    # pick the median of 3 possible pivots
    #pivots = [ random.randrange(l,r) for i in range(3) ]
    rr = random.randrange
    pivots = [ rr(l,r) for i in range(3) ]
    pivots.sort()

    i = l+1 # Barrier between below and above piviot, first higher element
    array[l], array[pivots[1]] = array[pivots[1]], array[l]

    for j in range(l+1,r):
        if array[j] < array[l]:
            array[i], array[j] = array[j], array[i]
            i = i+1

    array[l], array[i-1] = array[i-1], array[l]

    quicksort(array, l, i-1)
    quicksort(array, i, r)

    return array

Edit 2: This is the corrected code due. There was an error in the algorithm for picking the 3 pivots

import random

def quicksort(array, l=0, r=-1):
    # array is list to sort, array is going to be passed by reference, this is new to me, try not to suck
    # l is the left bound of the array to be acte on
    # r is the right bound of the array to act on

    if r == -1:
        r = len(array)

    # base case
    if r-l <= 1:
        return

    # pick the median of 3 possible pivots
    mid = int((l+r)*0.5)
    pivot = 0
    #pivots = [ l, mid, r-1]
    if array[l] > array[mid]:
        if array[r-1]> array[l]:
            pivot = l
        elif array[mid] > array[r-1]:
            pivot = mid
    else:
        if array[r-1] > array[mid]:
            pivot = mid
        else:
            pivot = r-1

    i = l+1 # Barrier between below and above piviot, first higher element
    array[l], array[pivot] = array[pivot], array[l]

    for j in range(l+1,r):
        if array[j] < array[l]:
            array[i], array[j] = array[j], array[i]
            i = i+1

    array[l], array[i-1] = array[i-1], array[l]

    quicksort(array, l, i-1)
    quicksort(array, i, r)

    return array
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  • 1
    It's sound weird. Why your pivot would be better if you take the median of three random pivots ?
    – melix
    Commented Sep 15, 2016 at 19:57
  • We need to see the rest of your code.
    – Kevin
    Commented Sep 15, 2016 at 19:57
  • 1
    your pivot selection is really strange ... Shouldn't the pivot be an element of the list to sort (presumably l)?
    – mgilson
    Commented Sep 15, 2016 at 19:58
  • 1
    @NunzioMeli Quicksort has an average case run time of O(nlogn) with a worst case of O(n^2). In order to guarantee that the runtime is very close to O(nlogn) you need the pivot to always be in the middle 50% of your list. Selecting the median pivot of 3 mean the pivot you select will have the above property with a high probability compared to a single random pivot Commented Sep 15, 2016 at 20:03
  • @mgilson Sorry! I've added the rest go the code. The pivot will be an index for an element that is in the list Commented Sep 15, 2016 at 20:04

2 Answers 2

2

You could choose the pivot in this way:

alen = len(array)
pivots = [[array[0],0], [array[alen//2],alen//2], [array[alen-1],alen-1]]]
pivots.sort(key=lambda tup: tup[0]) #it orders for the first element of the tupla
pivot = pivots[1][1]

Example:

enter image description here

1
  • I upvoted and marked this the answer because the technique worked well for me. I however used if statements to find the median of my possible pivots and saw a 10% speed up compared to the code above. I am attributing this speedup to the lack of lambda calls (which would be huge in this algorithm) Commented Sep 15, 2016 at 21:08
1

Though it can be outperformed by random choice on occasion, it's still worth looking into the median-of-medians algorithm for pivot selection (and rank selection in general), which runs in O(n) time. It's not too far off of what you are currently doing, but there is a stronger assurance behind it that it picks a "good" pivot as opposed to just taking the median of three random numbers.

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