4

When using the <nav> element in HTML, how should you handle navigation elements that contain links as well as other content (such as the logo in the example below)?

I find myself containing everything in a <nav> element:

<nav>      
  <div class="logo"></div>
  <div class="links">
    <a href>One</a>
    <a href>Two</a>
    <a href>Three</a>
  </div>
</nav>

But should I only be wrapping the actual navigation elements in a <nav>? (The links in this case)

<div class="nav">      
  <div class="logo"></div>
  <nav>
    <a href>One</a>
    <a href>Two</a>
    <a href>Three</a>
  </nav>
</div>

The same could apply to some of the other tags, such as <time>, if it contained extra data:

<div class="time">
  Article posted: <time>2016-09-16</time>
</div>

vs

<time>
  Article posted: <span>2016-09-16</span>
</time>

I'm not talking about the readability of the code, but about optimizing the markup structure for the benefit of crawlers (SEO) and accessibility.

Edit: The logo is just an example. Frequently there is much more content, I just used the logo as an example for brevity.

2

An HTML element should only contain content that matches the element’s definition (or that is relevant for the element’s purpose).

The nav element is for "links to other pages or to parts within the page", so the logo should not be included, unless it’s a link to the homepage, or if it’s needed for context (see for example the last example in the HTML5 spec, which shows that nav can also contain text that serves as context for the links).

If the logo (or whatever other content) were "tangentially related" to the content in the nav, you could use the aside element.

The time element is for "dates, times, time-zone offsets, and durations", so the label "Article posted" should not be included. With time, you mark up the date, not any additional stuff.

The decision is not always a clear one, though. It might help to think of conceivable use cases (e.g., what could a consumer do with the content of a specific element), and decide if the content in question would typically be expected for that purpose (primarily based on the definition and examples in the spec).

  • To build on @unor's time example: time offers nothing special to assistive technology nor to search engines. Consider using an attribute within the element to offer some value to parsers (microdata). Eg: <time datetime="2016-09-06T21:14:08+00:00">September 6, 2016</time> – aardrian Sep 20 '16 at 21:43
  • Thank you for your answer. Whilst you don't speak specifically to the question about crawlers, I assume it is implied that they also assume my code is following the spec, so deviating from the spec may cause problems? – Luke Sep 25 '16 at 16:05
  • @Luke: That’s the idea, yes. Authors follow the spec to mark up their content, consumers (e.g., crawlers) follow the spec to build conforming agents. -- Note that it’s off-topic on Stack Overflow to discuss what crawlers like/dislike (as this would be SEO advice); such questions can be asked on Webmasters -- however, there is typically not much to say about this as it’s not public/documented how crawlers work, so, again, there is only the good practice to follow the spec and think about what is good for your users. A good crawler shouldn’t expect authors not to do this. – unor Sep 25 '16 at 16:11
  • @unor You make a good point about them being undocumented, so straying from the spec is unwise. I will bear this in mind in my future projects. PS. I did not realise that other stackexchange site existed, thanks for pointing that out :) – Luke Sep 25 '16 at 16:16
2

As others have mentioned, items inside of the 'nav' element should be navigational links. The logo could click to home, so it could be considered a navigational link (although this might not a little unusual), while other elements (such as a non-link page title, paragraph text, a date or some other non-navigational content) would be invalid.

Using semantic html properly is very important for the machine technologies that read your code. This applies to screen readers, SEO crawlers and even browsers. As someone else had mentioned, the time element is meant to include content in a machine readable format - this way it can be added to a users calendar with a simple click (in some devices/browsers), as well as be announced as a time element to screen readers and other tech that might leverage it. Putting non-date/time content in that block will prohibit that functionality. In other examples, breaking the semantic best practices will cause your app to become less accessible and/or less SEO friendly.

This is a Success criteria covered by the WCAG (Web Content Accessibility Guidelines): WCAG - Using semantic elements to mark up structure

  • Thanks for your answer. With regard to what you are saying about machine readable formats I completely understand, but then how do they gather context? Say for example I have <time>15:00</time> - how does Google know what that relates to without supplementary information? – Luke Sep 25 '16 at 16:03
  • @Luke It's hard to say how Google will know what to do with your time example without additional context, but this actually helps illustrate how having proper semantics throughout your document will help with context. If you have a list of events in an <aside> element that has <time>15:00</time> in it, it will likely be ranked as less relevant to having the same element used in the body of an <article>, say under the <h1> tag. Google uses your semantics to break up the document and deliver the most relevant results based on the context of your page. Well coded pages will benefit most. – Skerrvy Sep 26 '16 at 13:09
0

Personally I think is better for both SEO and accessibility to keep the content of the nav related to navigation elements, that is the expectation and the usage of that html tag even if is not invalid html having other mark up inside.

To provide you with an actual example of where that approach might cause some issues, some websites provide the possibility for users that can't use a mouse to skip directly to some sections of a webpage with the tab key, thanks to "Skip Navigation" Links hidden in the very top of the page, http://webaim.org/techniques/skipnav/. In this scenario the expectation of the user is to than navigate straight away the menu items, however if there is extra mark up before it might get stuck tabbing through all those other elements before reaching the links.

Hope this helps

  • That is an interesting read. Based on that, if you use a fixed top navigation, you might benefit from putting it at the end of the markup. It would still show where it was meant to, but not be a lengthy hurdle for screen readers at the beginning of the page. – Luke Sep 16 '16 at 17:02
0

The <nav> wrapper is meant to designate major blocks of navigation links. It will accept any tag that falls in the "flow content" category.

There's nothing in the spec that specifically prohibits putting an icon in there, but unless the logo is a clickable link (as it often is) I would suggest leaving it outside the nav tag.

  • I'm not referring specifically to having a logo in there, the logo was just an example of additional content that doesn't pertain to navigation. – Luke Sep 16 '16 at 3:47
  • In that case it should be ommitted/placed outside the <nav> element. The idea is that anything in there should reference another page/element. What might happen if you include things in there, is that screen readers may skip rendering content placed in the <nav> and you could possibly lose content to that sectioning. <nav>is used for exclusion of content so I personally try to keep important parts of my page out of it. – user5450821 Sep 16 '16 at 4:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.