4

I am trying to align these strings with their respective indexes. The strings look like this:

char *mystrings[] = {"Fred", "Augustine", "Bob", "Lenny", "Ricardo"};

and my output looks like this:

Fred 0
Augustine 1
Bob 2
Lenny 3
Ricardo 4

But I am after some thing like this:

Fred       0
Augustine  1
Bob        2
Lenny      3
Ricardo    4

Whereby the indexes are aligned the same. I'm just trying to make it more readable. This is what my code looks like so far:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int
main(void) {
    int i;
    char *mystrings[] = {"Fred", "Augustine", "Bob", "Lenny", "Ricardo"};

    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        printf("%s %d\n", mystrings[i], i);
    }

    return 0;
}

Is there a way I can do this? Like compare the indexes with the longest string, and then make the spaces for the integers like that?

4
  • 7
    See "field width" in the printf man page – kaylum Sep 16 '16 at 3:19
  • 2
    Why use MAXSIZE in char *mystrings[MAXSIZE] - Get the compiler to do the work i.e. char *mystrings[],,, – Ed Heal Sep 16 '16 at 3:20
  • @EdHeal my bad. I will change that. – RoadRunner Sep 16 '16 at 3:24
  • 1
    sample – BLUEPIXY Sep 16 '16 at 3:31
6

Extra loop to calculate the max width, then use the * printf flag to take the width from an argument (which is multiplied by -1 to cause left justification)

char *mystrings[] = {"Fred", "Augustine", "Bob", "Lenny", "Ricardo"};
int width = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(mystrings)/sizeof(char*); i++) {
    width = strlen(mystrings[i]) > width? strlen(mystrings[i]) : width;
}

for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(mystrings)/sizeof(char*); i++) {
    printf("%*s %d\n", -1 * width, mystrings[i], i);
}
1
2

You need to specify a width for the string in the format specification.
Then, you need to use the - specifier to indicate that you want the output to be left justified.

Using

printf("%-10s %d\n", mystrings[i], i);

will use 10 characters for mystrings[i] and will left justify the output.

Hard coding a number like that will be a problem if you don't know the lengths of the strings. To make your program a bit robust, you can compute the maximum length of the strings and then compute the format string from that.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define MAXSIZE 5

int main(void) {
   int i;
   char *mystrings[MAXSIZE] = {"Fred", "Augustine", "Bob", "Lenny", "Ricardo"};

   int maxLen = 0;
   for (i = 0; i < MAXSIZE; i++) {
      int len = strlen(mystrings[i]);
      maxLen = (len > maxLen) ? len : maxLen;
   }

   char formatString[50];
   sprintf(formatString, "%%-%ds %%d\n", maxLen + 1);

   for (i = 0; i < MAXSIZE; i++) {
      printf(formatString, mystrings[i], i);
   }

   return 0;
}

Output

Fred       0
Augustine  1
Bob        2
Lenny      3
Ricardo    4
3
  • Fine solution from what I can see, but going down the path of dynamic format strings, in my opinion, is something C programmers should avoid, unless absolutely necessary. – Ryan Sep 16 '16 at 3:57
  • @self any particular reason for avoiding dynamic format strings? (Except that they are perhaps hard to read)(( and map to lice in nethack .. or rogue, I forget )) – Tibrogargan Sep 16 '16 at 4:01
  • 2
    @Tibrogargan If it just so happens that format string comes from user input, it becomes a vulnerability. Not that this would be the case here, but in general you wouldn't want user input being used as a the format string. – Ryan Sep 16 '16 at 4:05
2

What you need to do is arrive at the max length of a string. You can get the max length of a string, then some simple arithmetic to figure out how much padding (whitespace at the end of a string) you need. Without using printf, and for educational purposes, I'll show you how you can do it.

Output:

Fred      0
Augustine 1
Bob       2
Lenny     3
Ricardo   4

Here is an example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

static size_t max_len(const char * const data[], size_t size) {
    size_t i = 0;
    size_t max = strlen(data[0]);

    for(i = 1; i < size; i++) {
        size_t len = strlen(data[i]);

        if(len > max) {
            max = len;
        }
    }
    return max;
}

int main(void) {
    const char *const mystrings[] = {
        "Fred", "Augustine", "Bob", "Lenny", "Ricardo"
    };

    size_t m = max_len(mystrings, 5);
    size_t i;

    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        const char *item = mystrings[i];
        size_t len = strlen(item);
        size_t padding = 0;
        /* +1 for padding byte */
        if(len + 1 < m) {
           padding = m - len;
        }

        printf("%s ", item);

        size_t ii;

        for(ii = 0; ii < padding; ii++) {
            fputc(' ', stdout);
        }

        printf("%zu\n", i);
    }

    return 0;
}

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