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Hello again for the 2nd time this night! I'm trying to create an error message if the input for the string does not contain the words/characters: Yes, YES, No, no, Y, y, N, n; and loop back to get the correct input. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated! :)

do{ 

addAnother = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Would you like to enter another salespersons' data?");

if (!addAnother.matches("[YesYESNonoYyNn]"))
    System.out.println("Valid answers: Yes, YES, No, no, Y, y, N, n");
}
while (addAnother.matches("[YesYESNonoYyNn]"));
1
  • Tried using regular expression? "^((yes)|(y)|(no)|(n))$" by stripping out spaces from boths ends first and then converting the addAnother variable to lowercase first?
    – blackpen
    Sep 16, 2016 at 7:07

2 Answers 2

2

Don't bother using regular expressions for this. Set up a constant that's got all the strings you want to match in a HashSet and use contains

So outside of all your class's methods, you'll have

private static final Set<String> validOptions = new HashSet<>(Arrays.asList("Yes", "YES", "No", "no", "Y", "y", "N", "n"));

And to validate, you'll just have

while (true) {
    addAnother = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Would you like to enter another salespersons' data?");

    if (validOptions.contains(addAnother)) {
        break;
    }

    System.out.println("Not a valid option");
}

Update

There are lots of ways to improve on this, of course. @blackpen has suggested a couple in comments. One really good way would be to factor all of this out into a separate method, and actually return true or false to indicate whether the user answered yes or no to the question. So your class might include all of this.

public class GregsFunkyClass {

    private static final Map<String,Boolean> validOptions = new HashMap<>();
    static {
        validOptions.put("yes", true);
        validOptions.put("y", true);
        validOptions.put("no", false);
        validOptions.put("n", false);
    }

    private boolean shouldEnterMoreData() {
        while (true) {
            String input = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Would you like to enter another salespersons' data?");
            boolean toReturn = validOptions.get(input.trim().toLowerCase());
            if (toReturn != null) {
                return toReturn;
            }
            System.out.println("Not a valid option");
        } 
    }
}

Then you can call this method from some other method in your class and actually get the answer you were looking for. Here, the trim() call removes leading and trailing whitespace, and the toLowerCase() call makes a mixed case or upper case input match the values that we've actually put in the map.

Note - you're doing something a bit strange, mixing up console output with GUI input. Typically, an application is either a GUI or a console application, but not a hybrid. You might want to actually output the error message in a wee popup, rather than on the console, if the user types a wrong option. I haven't done that here, but hopefully you get the idea.

4
  • Good one. Yeah, probably way easier than regular expressions. But, watch out if the user enters leading/trailing spaces ... and also if he uses mixed case letters.
    – blackpen
    Sep 16, 2016 at 7:09
  • And may be you also want to lower-case all the elements of the hash as well as lower-case the user's input, so that they will match exactly?
    – blackpen
    Sep 16, 2016 at 7:11
  • But, I guess you still want to handle mixed-case typing (YeS, nO)? Yes, OP eventually needs to check for both postitive (yes) and negative (no). Because, on positive, he loops; on negative, he quits.
    – blackpen
    Sep 16, 2016 at 7:17
  • The entire program is supposed to loop back around and I can go through and enter it again. However, I'm stuck again. Now I need my last while / do while loop to only contain the yes values. EDIT I made another hashset with only the yes values and it works! Thank you @DavidWallace
    – Greg Smith
    Sep 16, 2016 at 7:20
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Apart from @David's nice answer, just in case, if you still want to use regular expressions (inefficient?), here is how you can do that too:

public class Main {

     public static boolean isYes(String str) {
        String s1=str.trim();
        return(s1.matches("(?i:^((yes)|(y))$)"));
     }

     public static boolean isNo(String str) {
        String s1=str.trim(); 
        return(s1.matches("(?i:^((no)|(n))$)"));
     }

     public static void main(String []args) {

        System.out.println(isYes(" yes "));
        System.out.println(isYes("  yEs  "));
        System.out.println(isYes("  y"));

        System.out.println(isNo(" yes "));
        System.out.println(isNo("  yEs  "));
        System.out.println(isNo("  y"));

        //--------------------------------

        System.out.println(isNo(" NO "));
        System.out.println(isNo("  no   "));
        System.out.println(isNo("n   "));

        System.out.println(isYes(" NO "));
        System.out.println(isYes("  no   "));
        System.out.println(isYes("n   "));

     }
}

Output:

true
true
true
false
false
false
true
true
true
false
false
false

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