Is there any code to perform automatic migration in Entity Framework core code first in asp.net core project?

I do it simply in MVC4/5 by adding

Database.SetInitializer(new MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion<AppDbContext, MyProject.Migrations.Configuration>());
public Configuration() {
          AutomaticMigrationsEnabled = true;
        }

This saves time when entities changed

  • It's called EntityFramework Core 1.0, thanks – Tseng Sep 16 '16 at 8:36
up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can call context.Database.Migrate()in your Startup.cs

eg:

using (var context = new MyContext(...))
{
    context.Database.Migrate();
}
  • MyContext looks this way , I don't know what to put in options public ApplicationDbContext(DbContextOptions<ApplicationDbContext> options) : base(options) { } – Lapenkov Vladimir Sep 16 '16 at 9:45
  • Refer to this article to see how you can manually configure your context stackoverflow.com/questions/38417051/… and github.com/aspnet/EntityFramework/issues/6493 – Frank Odoom Sep 16 '16 at 9:49
  • I do the following way in Startup.cs : Startup::Configure after defining routes i add : var options = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<ApplicationDbContext>(); options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("DefaultConnection")); using (var context = new ApplicationDbContext(options.Options)) { context.Database.Migrate(); } but this doesn't perform migrations – Lapenkov Vladimir Sep 16 '16 at 10:15
  • Register your context with dependency injection docs.efproject.net/en/latest/platforms/aspnetcore/new-db.html – Frank Odoom Sep 16 '16 at 10:44
  • 1
    @FrankOdoom Answer is wrong, unless individual migration steps are added, Migration does not work and it is not equivalent of AutomaticMigrationsEnabled – Akash Kava Nov 6 '17 at 20:30

EF core doesn't support automatic migrations.So you have to do it manually.

From the perspective of automatic migrations as a feature, we are not planning to implement it in EF Core as experience has showed code-base migrations to be a more manageable approach.

You can read full story here : Not to implement Automatic Migrations

  • 6
    Be that as it may, it worked perfectly for me in all the projects I worked on, resulting in extremely low-fuss maintenance especially during the build-up of a project. Shame that it is gone, but I can imagine sometimes the overhead wasn't worth it. – Arwin Oct 8 '16 at 14:06
  • Still no chance for automatic migrations to be supported in EF Core 2.0 in Sep. 2017? – Afshar Mohebbi Sep 16 '17 at 8:08
  • Maybe this helps: @Afshar github.com/aspnet/EntityFrameworkCore/issues/8045 – Sampath Sep 16 '17 at 9:18
  • Thank you @Sampath, the link provides an alternative instead of automatic migrations, if I am understanding correctly. My team needs automatic migration in production enviroment rather than dev environment. – Afshar Mohebbi Sep 16 '17 at 9:37
  • Oh..OK, Actually I'm not using this tech stack now due to now I'm working only on Ionic mobile apps.But according to my post's link, they labeled it as closed-wont-fix @Afshar – Sampath Sep 16 '17 at 9:46

This is the way they do it in IdentityServer4 http://identityserver.io

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    var connectionString = Configuration.GetConnectionString("DefaultConnection");
    var migrationsAssembly = typeof(Startup).GetTypeInfo().Assembly.GetName().Name;

    // Add framework services.
    services.AddDbContext<ApplicationDbContext>(options =>
            options.UseSqlServer(connectionString));
    ...
}
public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env, ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
{
    // this will do the initial DB population
    InitializeDatabase(app);
}

private void InitializeDatabase(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
    using (var scope = app.ApplicationServices.GetService<IServiceScopeFactory>().CreateScope())
    {
        scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<ApplicationDbContext>().Database.Migrate();
        scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<PersistedGrantDbContext>().Database.Migrate();
        ...
    }
}

Automatic migrations is not supported in EF Core. Migration it is necessary to create hands. To automatically apply all existing handmade migrations need to add the following code in the DbContext:

public sealed class MyDbContext : DbContext
{
  private static readonly bool[] _migrated = { false };

  public MyDbContext( DbContextOptions<MyDbContext> options ) : base( options )
  {
    if ( !_migrated[0] )
      lock ( _migrated )
        if ( !_migrated[0] )
        {
          Database.Migrate(); // apply all migrations
          _migrated[0] = true;
        }
  }

It's not elegant, but works.

Update for EFCore 2.1:

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var host = CreateWebHostBuilder(args).Build();

        using (var scope = host.Services.CreateScope())
        {
            var services = scope.ServiceProvider;

            try
            {
                var context = services.GetRequiredService<MyDbContext>();
                context.Database.Migrate(); // apply all migrations
                SeedData.Initialize(services); // Insert default data
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                var logger = services.GetRequiredService<ILogger<Program>>();
                logger.LogError(ex, "An error occurred seeding the DB.");
            }
        }

        host.Run();
    }

    public static IWebHostBuilder CreateWebHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
        WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
            .UseStartup<Startup>();
}

}

  • Why are you using an array if you only access the element at 0? – ProfK May 23 '17 at 5:52
  • 4
    in order to have one field for the lock and a quick check without unboxing. – Mentor May 25 '17 at 14:20

Following Microsoft's documentation

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/data/ef-mvc/intro

If you are using dependency injection, first, you need to setup a static class Data/DbInitializer.cs and add the following code:

public static class DbInitializer
{
    public static void Initialize(ApplicationDbContext context)
    {
        context.Database.Migrate();

        // Add Seed Data...
    }
}

Notice, this is also where you can add seed data.

Next, in your Program.cs file, add the following code

public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var host = BuildWebHost(args);

        using (var scope = host.Services.CreateScope())
        {
            var services = scope.ServiceProvider;
            try
            {
                var environment = services.GetRequiredService<IHostingEnvironment>();

                if (!environment.IsDevelopment())
                {
                    var context = services.GetRequiredService<ApplicationDbContext>();
                    DbInitializer.Initialize(context);
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                var logger = services.GetRequiredService<ILogger<Program>>();
                logger.LogError(ex, "An error occurred while seeding the database.");
            }
        }

        host.Run();
    }

In my case, I'm checking the environment to make sure I'm in development so I can control the migrations/updates. However, in production, I want them to be automatic for continuous integration. As others have mentioned, this is probably not best practices but on small projects it works great.

My working automigration code Asp Net Core 2.0.7.

    // startup.cs
    public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env)
    {
        // configure app

        SeedData.Initialize(app.ApplicationServices);
    }       

    // dbInitializer.cs
    public static class SeedData
    {
        public static void Initialize(IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
        {
            using (var serviceScope = serviceProvider.CreateScope())
            {
                var context = serviceScope.ServiceProvider.GetService<ApplicationDbContext>();

                // auto migration
                context.Database.Migrate();

                // Seed the database.
                InitializeUserAndRoles(context);
            }
        }

        private static void InitializeUserAndRoles(ApplicationDbContext context)
        {
            // init user and roles  
        }
    }

my best advice is not to use the automatic migration.It is always better to add migrations manually and also avoid bulk migration and stick to best practice for using manual migration

automatic migration is not a magic tool and there will be several occasions where you might want to add some addition changes to the migration. You only accomplish by using manual migration.

To enable migration, type "enable-migrations" in the package manager console

This way you will have full control of upgrading or downgrading your database and also easy to track migrations.

Just three simple steps in package manager console.

1) add-migrations [some name for your migration]

2) migrations is generated for the changes, you review them and also can make changes to it

3) update-database your migration is complete now.

handling migration is less painful!

  • 1
    When the model changes a lot and and multiple people work on the same project, migrations leads more problems than solutions. Moreover, having thousands of migrations makes the build slower and complicated for no reason. In this context, automatic migration seems the more reasonnable approach. – eka808 Aug 20 at 9:41

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