15

I am working on saving files to sql blob to a varbinary(max) column, and have got the save side of things working now (I believe).

What I can't figure out is how to read the data out, given that I'm retrieving my DB values using a stored procedure I should be able to access the column data like ds.Tables[0].Rows[0]["blobData"]; so is it necessary that I have an SQLCommand etc like I've seen in examples such as the one below:

private void OpenFile(string selectedValue)
{
    String connStr = "...connStr";
    fileName = ddlFiles.GetItemText(ddlFiles.SelectedItem);

    using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connStr))
    {
        conn.Open();
        using (SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
        {
            cmd.CommandText = "SELECT BLOBData FROM BLOBTest WHERE testid = " + selectedValue;

            using (SqlDataReader dr = cmd.ExecuteReader())
            {
                while (dr.Read())
                {
                    int size = 1024 * 1024;
                    byte[] buffer = new byte[size];
                    int readBytes = 0;
                    int index = 0;

                    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(fileName, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None))
                    {
                        while ((readBytes = (int)dr.GetBytes(0, index, buffer, 0, size)) > 0)
                        {
                            fs.Write(buffer, 0, readBytes);
                            index += readBytes;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

Is there a simpler way to do this when I can access the column that I need without the sqlcommand?

Hope I was clear enough in my question, if not then ask and I will elaborate!

UPDATE:

The situation is now this- I have the value of the blobData column returned by my stored procedure, and can pass this into a memory stream and call 'LoadDocument(memStream); however this results in jibberish text instead of my actual file displaying.

My question now is is there a way to get the full path including file extension of a file stored in an SQL Blob? I am currently looking into using a Filetable for this in the hopes that I will be able to get the full path.

UPDATE 2:

I tried creating a temp file and reading this to no avail (still gibberish)

                string fileName = System.IO.Path.GetTempFileName().ToString().Replace(".tmp", fileExt);

            using (MemoryStream myMemoryStream = new MemoryStream(blobData, 0, (int)blobData.Length, false, true))
            {
                using (FileStream myFileStream1 = File.Create(fileName))
                {
                    myMemoryStream.WriteTo(myFileStream1);

                    myMemoryStream.Flush();
                    myMemoryStream.Close();

                    myFileStream1.Flush();
                    myFileStream1.Close();

                    FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(fileName);

                    Process prc = new Process();
                    prc.StartInfo.FileName = fi.FullName;
                    prc.Start();
                }
            }

Cheers, H

  • 1
    I suggest don't use "...WHERE testid = " + selectedValue, because it is not kosher and leads to SQL Injection. Instead use parameters, e.g. "... WHERE testid = @id" and cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@id", testid). – Gabrielius Sep 20 '16 at 9:26
  • I will amend this, thank you. As for the update in my question, have you any idea what can be done? I think I somehow need to restore the original file path from the stored blob – bjjrolls Sep 20 '16 at 9:29
  • 2
    @bjjrolls, the blob column will contain only what you wrote to it. So, to get the file path and extension from the database you need to store it there. I'd add a separate column for storing the file name. Split the problem into smaller steps. At first verify that you can read the file back from the database correctly by saving the blob data (byte[]) to a file and comparing the original file with the result that was retrieved from the database. Only after you confirm this you can move on to loading your document in a viewer and the question becomes "how to use viewer/library XYZ". – Vladimir Baranov Sep 20 '16 at 12:12
  • Have you considered using a SQL Server FileStream object, you can then access the data as if it were a file. The recommendation is to use FileStream for 1.) Objects that are being stored are, on average, larger than 1 MB. 2.) Fast read access is important. 3.) You are developing applications that use a middle tier for application logic. – Steve Ford Sep 23 '16 at 14:32
  • thanks for your replies @VladimirBaranov and SteveFord but i'm now making use of a filestream filetable to store users files as they will usually be larger than 2mb – bjjrolls Sep 23 '16 at 14:47
19
+25

You are making it more difficult than it needs to be. This is using MySQL just because it is handy - the providers all work pretty much the same. Some things will need to be tweaked to handle very large data items (more of a server thing than DB Provider).

Saving image

string sql = "INSERT INTO BlobDemo (filename, fileType, fileData) VALUES (@name, @type, @data)";
byte[] imgBytes;

using (MySqlConnection dbCon = new MySqlConnection(MySQLConnStr))
using (MySqlCommand cmd = new MySqlCommand(sql, dbCon))
{  
    string ext = Path.GetExtension(filename);

    dbCon.Open();
    cmd.Parameters.Add("@name", MySqlDbType.String).Value = "ziggy";
    cmd.Parameters.Add("@data", MySqlDbType.Blob).Value = File.ReadAllBytes(filename);
    cmd.Parameters.Add("@tyoe", MySqlDbType.String).Value = ext;
    int rows = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
}

The file data is fed directly to the DB Provider

is there a way to get the full path including file extension of a file stored in an SQL Blob?

No. Your code and the code above is saving the bytes which make up an image or any file.

Read Img Data back

This will read the data back, save it to file and start the associated app:

string SQL = "SELECT itemName, itemData, itemtype FROM BlobDemo WHERE Id = @id";

string ext = "";
string tempFile = Path.Combine(@"C:\Temp\Blobs\", 
    Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(Path.GetTempFileName())); 

using (MySqlConnection dbCon = new MySqlConnection(MySQLConnStr))
using (MySqlCommand cmd = new MySqlCommand(SQL, dbCon))
{
    cmd.Parameters.Add("@id", MySqlDbType.Int32).Value = 14;
    dbCon.Open();

    using (MySqlDataReader rdr =  cmd.ExecuteReader())
    {
        if (rdr.Read())
        {
            ext = rdr.GetString(2);
            File.WriteAllBytes(tempFile + ext, (byte[])rdr["itemData"]);
        }
    }

    // OS run test
    Process prc = new Process();
    prc.StartInfo.FileName = tempFile + ext;
    prc.Start();
}
  • 1 The number of bytes read back matched
  • 1 The associated app launched just fine with the image
  • 1 The image showed in the picturebox

In both cases, File.ReadAllBytes() and File.WriteAllBytes() will do most of the work for you, no matter the file type.

There is no need to scoop out the data 1k at a time. If the blob was something like an image you wished to use in the app:

using (MySqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader())
{
    if (rdr.Read())
    {
        ext = rdr.GetString(2);
        using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream((byte[])rdr["imgData"]))
        {
            picBox.Image = Image.FromStream(ms);
        }
    }
}

The blob bytes can be fed to the memstream, and even a temp Image need not be created unless you don't need to show it.

In all, Ceiling Cat made it back just fine (image was 1.4 MB, zoomed; another test with a 15.4 MB image also worked - both are larger than I would care to store in a DB).:

enter image description here

Depending on how this is used, consider archiving the images to somewhere on the file system and just saving the filename - perhaps with the Id added to assure the names are unique and help visually link them to the record. Not only will large blobs of data bloat the DB, but there is obviously some overhead involved in converting to and from bytes which can be avoided.


If you want/need to delete these at some point after the associated app is done with them (not really a component of the question), then use a tempfile in a specific directory so you can delete everything in it (conditionally1) when the app ends, or at start up:

private string baseAppPath = Path.Combine(Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.CommonApplicationData),
                    "Company Name", "Product Name", "Temp Files");

Append a Temp Filename and the actual extension for individual files. Alternatively, you could maintain a List<string> trashCan to store the name of each file you create to be deleted later.

1 Whenever you do delete them, do allow that files could still be open in the app associated with the extension.

  • Thanks for putting so much effort into your answer, I appreciate it. I see what you mean, but my concern is that this will create a new file everytime the user accesses it where I would like to simply stream from the blobData column. Is there a way of deleting this file right away if it is necessary to create it? – bjjrolls Sep 21 '16 at 10:23
  • Another issue is that it will not always be image type, it can be .doc, .docx, .pdf, .jpeg, .png and a few more, but on the save I store the file extension in a separate column. Will all of this be feasible? – bjjrolls Sep 21 '16 at 10:24
  • I dont know what "this" in ... my concern is that this will create a new file refers to. It sounds like File.ReadAllBytes() and File.WriteAllBytes() is what you need. See edit – Ňɏssa Pøngjǣrdenlarp Sep 21 '16 at 16:02
7

With the .NET SQL Server provider, you can use a little-known but cool class called SqlBytes. It's been designed specifically to map varbinary fields, but there are not many examples on how to use it.

Here is how you can save to the database with it (you can use a stored procedure or direct SQL like I demonstrate here, we just presume the MyBlobColumn is a varbinary one).

string inputPath = "YourInputFile";
using (var conn = new SqlConnection(YourConnectionString))
{
    conn.Open();
    using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
    {
        // note we define a '@blob' parameter in the SQL text
        cmd.CommandText = "INSERT INTO MyTable (Id, MyBlobColumn) VALUES (1, @blob)";
        using (var inputStream = File.OpenRead(inputPath))
        {
            // open the file and map it to an SqlBytes instance
            // that we use as the parameter value.
            var bytes = new SqlBytes(inputStream);
            cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("blob", bytes);

            // undercovers, the reader will suck the inputStream out through the SqlBytes parameter
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }
    }
}

To read the file out into a stream from the database, here is how you can do it.

string outputPath = "YourOutputFile";
using (var conn = new SqlConnection(YourConnectionString))
{
    conn.Open();
    using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
    {
        // this is a regular direct SQL command, but you can use a stored procedure as well
        cmd.CommandText = "SELECT MyBlobColumn FROM MyTable WHERE Id = 1";

        // note the usage of SequentialAccess to lower memory consumption (read the docs for more)
        using (var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.SequentialAccess))
        {
            if (reader.Read())
            {
                // again, we map the result to an SqlBytes instance
                var bytes = reader.GetSqlBytes(0); // column ordinal, here 1st column -> 0

                // I use a file stream, but that could be any stream (asp.net, memory, etc.)
                using (var file = File.OpenWrite(outputPath))
                {
                    bytes.Stream.CopyTo(file);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

With these techniques, we never allocated any byte[] nor MemoryStream instances, just used in and out SQL or File Streams.

6

You will need to use a SqlCommand to retrieve data when data is stored in a varbinary(MAX) column unless you use a FileTable, which allows access to the contents via UNC path similarly to regular files stored on a file system, but managed by SQL Server.

If the size of the blob may be large, the "chunk" technique you are currently using will reduce memory requirements, but at the expense of more verbose code. For reasonably size blob sizes, you could read the entire column contents at once without a chunking method. Whether this is feasible depends on both the size of the blob and client available memory.

var buffer = (byte[])cmd.ExecuteScalar();
fs.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
  • Thanks. I've got it now that I have the buffer as a byte array. How can I actually show this document now in a documentViewer object for example? Or a rtfTextBox? – bjjrolls Sep 16 '16 at 13:17
  • @bjjrolls, it will depend on what's stored in the blob. If it's an rtf document, you could set the RtfText property of the rtf text box control to the binary value converted to a string. I know nothing about documentViewer so I can't comment on that. – Dan Guzman Sep 16 '16 at 14:59
  • hi @DanGuzman hope you had a good weekend. I'm trying to figure this out. Basically I have been able to save certain file types to SQL blob (namely .doc/.docx/pdf/jpeg...' etc) but now need to be able to display them at the click of a button. Will this work the same for my needs? I don't know if I need to specify the file type when trying to open which might be a problem. Thanks – bjjrolls Sep 19 '16 at 8:48
  • 1
    @bjjrolls, not sure if I can help but what document viewer are you using? – Dan Guzman Sep 19 '16 at 15:09
  • 1
    @bjjrolls, have you compared the original file and blob saved as file? Do they have the same sizes? I guess, you could calculate SHA1 on both files and see if they match, you would get some clarity as what is going on. – Gabrielius Sep 21 '16 at 8:27

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