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I have a mixed mode C++/CLI class and interface that I want to use from C#. The interface is defined like this:

public interface class IMapRenderingInterfacer 
{
    ...
    property int CurrentCacheSize { int get(); };
    ...
};

The implementation class has this declaration in its header file:

public ref class MapRenderingInterfacer : public IMapRenderingInterfacer
{
   ...
public:
    virtual property int CurrentCacheSize { int get();  }
   ...
};

And the implementation of the property is in the cpp file:

int MapRenderingInterfacer::CurrentCacheSize::get()
{
    return (*_nativeMapRenderingInterface)->getCurrentCacheSize()/1000000;
}

This compiles without errors or warnings, but when I try to use this property from a C# class, I get the following error:

Error CS1061 'IMapRenderingInterfacer' does not contain a definition for 'CurrentCacheSize' and no extension method 'CurrentCacheSize' accepting a first argument of type 'IMapRenderingInterfacer' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?)

This interface also contains a number of methods that I can use just fine from C#, but not this property.

Any ideas?

  • You have declared a managed property (CurrentCacheSize), but implemented a plain native method (MapRenderingInterfacer::CurrentCacheSize::get()). If you want your managed class to access native resources, store a pointer a native class instantiation, and forward calls (see also How to: Use Properties in C++/CLI). If that's what you were trying to do, make sure to use the correct syntax in your property implementation. (Also, your interface doesn't declare a virtual property. Is this intentional?) – IInspectable Sep 16 '16 at 12:01
  • Thanks for the input! I actually used that web page as reference, especially the "Virtual Properties" example, only that I need to keep the implementation in the cpp-instead of the header file, which I found described here: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/vstudio/en-US/… – tseval Sep 16 '16 at 12:28
  • 1
    The fundamentals are okay so the only obvious explanation is that your C# project has a reference to an old version of the C++/CLI assembly. Select the reference and look at the displayed path in the Properties window, check its date. And be sure to have both projects in the same solution and that your C# project uses a project reference so this can't go wrong. – Hans Passant Sep 16 '16 at 12:35
  • Ah, it was the reference that was wrong. I don't know why and how, but th it pointed to a completely wrong version of the assembly (release build pointed to an old debug version). I just removed and added the reference again, and everything worked! Thank you so much! – tseval Sep 16 '16 at 12:46
1

Hans Passant had it right! It was simply a project reference that pointed to the wrong version of the mixed mode assembly. Removing and adding the reference again in the project did the trick!

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