1

I'm using Jackcess to update data in an Access table. Another application is polling the data via the Microsoft Access Database Engine (Jet). However it could not get the updated data until I forced it to close the database and reopen it.

Does anyone know how the Access Database Engine detects data changes by Jackcess?

0

After some research I found Jackcess is type 4 database driver. It read/write to database file directly. JETS could not detect changes made my type 4 driver. In order to work with it, I need a JDBC-ODBC bridge, type 1 database driver. I have to extract some code from Java 7 and put them into Java 8. This only works for 32-bit Java because JETS is only 32 bit.

0

Does anyone know how the Access Database Engine detects data changes by Jackcess?

It doesn't. Your other application will have to close and re-open its Access Database Engine (ACE/Jet) connection in order for it to be aware of the changes made by Jackcess.

Note that this has implications if the other (ACE/Jet) application also needs to make changes to the Access database. Both applications will be writing directly to the Access database file independently of one another, and in that case there is a very real possibility of the file becoming corrupted.

Even if

each application only writes to certain table/columns. There is no overlap/conflict in writing.

there is still the possibility of corruption if all of the tables reside in the same database file. For example, if the Jackcess application allocates an additional data page to hold a new record, and the Jet/ACE application also needs to allocate an additional data page to hold some other record that it is trying to insert, then the Jet/ACE application would be unaware that the "next available page" has already been taken by the Jackcess application and would try to allocate that same page for itself. At best, the result would be some sort of error; at worst, the two applications would simply clobber each other's changes.

If the two applications really do write to completely separate sets of tables with no overlap, then the danger of corruption could be mitigated by keeping the two sets of tables in two separate .accdb files, using Linked Tables to allow applications to "see" all of the the tables in one place.

  • Will the database schema is designed that each application only writes to certain table/columns. There is no overlap/conflict in writing. – Ping Hu Sep 17 '16 at 2:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.