7

The command python manage.py makemigrations fails most of time due to the forms.py, in which new models or new fields are referenced at class definition level.

So I have to comment each such definitions for the migration to operate. It's a painfull task.

I don't understand why the migration process import the forms.py module. I think that importing models modules should be sufficient.

Is there a way to avoid those errors ?

6
  • 1
    You haven't shown the traceback, but my guess is that the Django checks framework is loading the urls, which in turn loads the views and forms. You should be able to restructure your form to avoid the errors, but we can't help with that unless you show some code. This question is similar.
    – Alasdair
    Sep 16, 2016 at 16:38
  • Thanks @alasdair. If migrations import url.py, then I understand my problem. I still not understand why it imports the urls! I am surprised that other people does not claim about that.
    – albar
    Sep 16, 2016 at 21:06
  • 1
    It's the system check that imports the URLs, not the migration. The system checks run before the makemigrations command.
    – Alasdair
    Sep 16, 2016 at 21:27
  • OK I understand. I am just surprised to be alone to get this problem.
    – albar
    Sep 16, 2016 at 21:35
  • 1
    You're not alone. I linked to a similar question in the first comment.
    – Alasdair
    Sep 16, 2016 at 21:39

6 Answers 6

6

I was having this same issue and found the specific problem. When the migrate command was being called, Django's system checks made their way into my forms.py and then would fail when they encountered a line of code that made a query against a table that the migration was supposed to create. I had a choicefield that instantiated the choices with a database query like this:

university = forms.ChoiceField(
    choices=[('', '')] + [(university.id, university.name) for university in University.objects.all()],
    widget=forms.Select(
        attrs={
            'class': 'form-control',
            'placeholder': 'University',
        }
    ),
    required=True
)

The solution was to remove the query from choices (leaving it just as [('', '')] and then populate the choices in the class's init method instead.

class UniversityForm(forms.Form):

    university = forms.ChoiceField(
        choices=[('', '')],
        widget=forms.Select(
            attrs={
                'class': 'form-control',
                'placeholder': 'University',
            }
        ),
        required=True
    )


def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
    super(UniversityForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

    # Load choices here so db calls are not made during migrations.
    self.fields['university'].choices = [('', '')] + [(university.name, university.name) for university in University.objects.all()]
2
  • 3
    This is the right answer! Django imports urls.py -> view.py -> forms.py, in which class declarations execute class instances declarations (like choices=... and querysets=), so these latters have to be moved in __init__. Apr 12, 2020 at 9:31
  • this is the right answer op, please review it.
    – rmindzstar
    Feb 2, 2021 at 10:33
3

Thanks to @alasdair I understood my problem and found a workaround: I replace the original code in the views.py file

from MyApp import forms

with

import sys
if 'makemigrations' not in sys.argv and 'migrate' not in sys.argv:
    from MyApp import forms

It works fine in my case, but I suppose there is a better way to know if the current process is a migration or not. If so, please advise.

1
  • 2
    This is probably not the right way to go. The issue in the forms.py should be fixed - it sounds like it's probably querying the database at import time, which is not a good idea. See Nate's answer for a way to restructure a form to avoid this. May 14, 2019 at 11:08
0

Exclude the new columns with .only in your query like this:

University.objects.only('id', 'name').all()

Then run your migration.

0

I had a similar issue with ModelChoiceField in one of my forms. I had to comment out my forms code in order to be able to make migrations.

For me the solution was to move all form imports into their respective view method in views.py.

before:

from .forms import CalculatorForm

def calculator(request):            
    if request.method != 'POST':
        form = CalculatorForm()
        # ...

after:

def calculator(request):
    from .forms import CalculatorForm
    if request.method != 'POST':
        form = CalculatorForm()
        # ...
2
  • What a pain if you have a lot of views! Despite other comments, I think my solution is the best one because it takes only 3 more lines a the beginning of the module and avoids polluting the rest of the code.
    – albar
    Oct 6, 2019 at 13:59
  • Well that is debatable. It's only one additional import for each view that has a form. Oct 6, 2019 at 14:42
0

Since Django>=3.0 some management commands could be called without using the checks framework in advance via --skip-checks (reference). So migrations could be applied, even if some code paths in forms, views, whatever are currently not in an ideal condition (again: see answer from @erik-kalkoken for a cleaner solution):

./manage.py migrate --skip-checks
-1

init via callable...

def get_provinces():
province_choices = []
for province in ProvinceCode.objects.filter(country_code_id=1).order_by('code'):
    province_choices.append((province.code, province.code))
return province_choices

class MemberForm(forms.Form):
    provinces = forms.ChoiceField(label='Provinces', 
    choices=get_provinces, required=True)

Refer here - Django relation error when running make migrations

1
  • Please don't post link-only answers to other Stack Exchange questions. Instead, include the essential portions of the answer here, and tailor the answer to this specific question. Sep 13, 2018 at 17:33

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