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I have been asked to define a function which is called avg. avg should calculate the average of two lists with the same amount of numbers - take all the numbers from both lists and calculate their average.
However, it is not allowed to use : nor more than one line (except import lines).

My closest try was:

//import line does not count as a line
import numpy
//the code line (only one is allowed)
avg=lambda lst1,lst2: numpy.mean(lst1+lst2)

My function properly calculates the average of the lists but it contains :, so it is not good enough.

  • What do you mean by "the average of two lists"? – user2357112 Sep 16 '16 at 20:49
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    if you're a beginner, one should not give you pointless tasks when there's a lot of interesting tasks to be done. Maybe they overproduced keyboards missing the colon key and want to flog them to python developpers? – Jean-François Fabre Sep 16 '16 at 20:49
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    I think what Jean-Francois is trying to point out is that "define a function without using a colon" is a pretty pointless programming task, since the obvious ways to do it (lambda and def) both do require colons. Part of the Zen of Python (try import this) is "there should be one, and preferably only one, obvious way to do it". The non-obvious ways are only rarely better, unless serious optimization is required. Readability trumps execution speed until it doesn't. – holdenweb Sep 16 '16 at 20:54
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    StackOverflow's topicality guidelines, per the help center call for something to be "a practical, answerable question". Practical value of this question is neigh impossible to observe (or, at minimum, not established in the question itself). See the Puzzles & Code Golf StackExchange as a location to which this question may be better-suited. – Charles Duffy Sep 16 '16 at 21:00
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    @Bharel, I'm only questioning "practical", not "answerable". If the OP is genuinely trying to get through a validity checker, they should include sufficient details to make their solution testable in the question. Certainly, it's easy to perform a security exploit without needing any function declarations, so a checker that tried to eliminate only function declarations would be effectively useless, serving no practical value. – Charles Duffy Sep 16 '16 at 21:04
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If someone asked you a pointless question, I would just give him a pointless answer. He deserves it.

import numpy  # You said it doesn't count as a line

# Take the : from dict's docstring.
exec("avg = lambda lst1, lst2{} numpy.mean(lst1+lst2)".format(dict.__doc__[213]))

>>> avg([1,2,3], [1,2,3])
2
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    I'm sorry for this pointless comment, but... you really made me laugh, thank you. – Pavel Gurkov Sep 16 '16 at 21:00
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    Your comment has a :, though – cricket_007 Sep 16 '16 at 21:02
  • @cricket_007 I can escape it out with \ : # Take the \: from dict's docstring. – Bharel Sep 16 '16 at 21:10
  • Your icon has 4 sets of : (you still get +1 upvote from me) – Joe Sep 19 '16 at 9:12
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Speaking of ridiculous, I suggest:

>>> exec(''.join(map(chr, [100, 101, 102, 32, 97, 118, 103, 40, 108, 115, 116, 49, 44, 32, 108, 115, 116, 50, 41, 58, 32, 114, 101,116, 117, 114, 110, 32, 48, 46, 53, 32, 42, 32, 115, 117, 109, 40, 108, 115, 116, 49, 32, 43, 32, 108, 115, 116, 50, 41, 32, 47, 32, 108, 101, 110, 40, 108, 115, 116, 49, 41])))
>>>
>>> avg([1,2,3,4],[5,6,7,8])
4.5
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    for readability, +1 – Chris_Rands Sep 16 '16 at 22:01
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You could use exec like in Bharel's answer but use the chr(58):

exec("avg = lambda lst1, lst2 " + chr(58) + " sum(lst1 + lst2, 0.) / (len(lst1) + len(lst2))")

print(avg([1,2,3], [4,5,6]))

Or if you really want to use numpy.mean:

exec("avg = lambda lst1, lst2 " + chr(58) + "numpy.mean(lst1+lst2)")
  • Yeah but why go the obvious way? dict's doc is way better. I think you're just jealous :-P btw, it's even py1/2/3 compatible! Working since 1999. – Bharel Sep 16 '16 at 21:36
  • @Bharel, lol, well it is py2/3 compatible now ;) – Padraic Cunningham Sep 16 '16 at 21:38

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