31

Is there any way to retrieve a page's javascript variables from a Google Chrome Content Script?

| improve this question | | | | |
65

If you really need to, you can insert a <script> element into the page's DOM; the code inside your <script> element will be executed and that code will have access to JavaScript variables at the scope of the window. You can then communicate them back to the content script using data- attributes and firing custom events.

Sound awkward? Why yes, it is, and intentionally so for all the reasons in the documentation that serg has cited. But if you really, really need to do it, it can be done. See here and here for more info. And good luck!

| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 1
    Ok that's better answer than mine. – serg Oct 19 '10 at 16:27
  • Thanks!! Such a simple and obvious need and so deeply hidden. Both accessing the page variables and communicating back with extension. – user109764 Aug 8 '15 at 0:07
20

I created a little helper method, have fun :)

to retrieve the window's variables "lannister", "always", "pays", "his", "debts", you execute the following:

var windowVariables = retrieveWindowVariables(["lannister", "always", "pays", "his", "debts"]);
console.log(windowVariables.lannister);
console.log(windowVariables.always);

my code:

function retrieveWindowVariables(variables) {
    var ret = {};

    var scriptContent = "";
    for (var i = 0; i < variables.length; i++) {
        var currVariable = variables[i];
        scriptContent += "if (typeof " + currVariable + " !== 'undefined') $('body').attr('tmp_" + currVariable + "', " + currVariable + ");\n"
    }

    var script = document.createElement('script');
    script.id = 'tmpScript';
    script.appendChild(document.createTextNode(scriptContent));
    (document.body || document.head || document.documentElement).appendChild(script);

    for (var i = 0; i < variables.length; i++) {
        var currVariable = variables[i];
        ret[currVariable] = $("body").attr("tmp_" + currVariable);
        $("body").removeAttr("tmp_" + currVariable);
    }

    $("#tmpScript").remove();

    return ret;
}

please note that i used jQuery.. you can easily use the native js "removeAttribute" and "removeChild" instead.

| improve this answer | | | | |
  • Is this answer applicable in the context of a content script? – esqew Jun 22 '14 at 22:29
  • yes, it is.. just use it straight from your plugin js – Liran Brimer Jun 24 '14 at 7:31
  • perfect solution, Thx – Manuel Amstutz May 8 '16 at 7:33
  • 3
    great, but this is not going to work with objects, check out the corrected version of this, scroll bottom posted by user "Taras" – Alexander Skiller Nov 27 '16 at 10:42
  • This won't work if you want access to something that can't be serialized. – Andrew Sumsion Mar 29 '19 at 23:37
14

Using Liran's solution, I'm adding some fix for Objects, here's correct solution:

function retrieveWindowVariables(variables) {
    var ret = {};

    var scriptContent = "";
    for (var i = 0; i < variables.length; i++) {
        var currVariable = variables[i];
        scriptContent += "if (typeof " + currVariable + " !== 'undefined') $('body').attr('tmp_" + currVariable + "', JSON.stringify(" + currVariable + "));\n"
    }

    var script = document.createElement('script');
    script.id = 'tmpScript';
    script.appendChild(document.createTextNode(scriptContent));
    (document.body || document.head || document.documentElement).appendChild(script);

    for (var i = 0; i < variables.length; i++) {
        var currVariable = variables[i];
        ret[currVariable] = $.parseJSON($("body").attr("tmp_" + currVariable));
        $("body").removeAttr("tmp_" + currVariable);
    }

     $("#tmpScript").remove();

    return ret;
}
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • I got an error when I use JSON.stringify(" + currVariable + ") like TypeError: Converting circular structure to JSON – Jean-philippe Emond Jul 30 '18 at 22:58
6

Chrome's documentation gives you a good starting point: https://developer.chrome.com/extensions/content_scripts#host-page-communication

This method allows you to extract a global page variable to your content script. It also uses an idea to only accept incoming messages that you recognize given your handshake. You can also just use Math.random() for the handshake but I was having some fun.

Explanation

  1. This method creates a script tag
  2. It stringifies the function propagateVariable and passes the current handShake and targeted variable name into the string for preservation since the function will not have access to our content script scope.
  3. Then it injects that script tag to the page.
  4. We then create a listener in our content script waiting to hear back from the page to pass back the variable we're after.
  5. By now the injected script has hit the page.
  6. The injected code was wrapped in an IIFE so it runs itself pushing the data to the listener.
  7. Optional: The listener makes sure that it had the correct handshake and voila we can trust the source of the data (It's not actually secure, but it helps create an identifier in this case, that gives us some level of trust).

Round 1

v1.0

const globalToExtract = 'someVariableName';
const array = new Uint32Array(5);
const handShake = window.crypto.getRandomValues(array).toString();

function propagateVariable(handShake, variableName) {
  const message = { handShake };
  message[variableName] = window[variableName];
  window.postMessage(message, "*");
}

(function injectPropagator() {
  const script = `( ${propagateVariable.toString()} )('${handShake}', '${globalToExtract}');`
  const scriptTag = document.createElement('script');
  const scriptBody = document.createTextNode(script);
  
  scriptTag.id = 'chromeExtensionDataPropagator';
  scriptTag.appendChild(scriptBody);
  document.body.append(scriptTag);
})();

window.addEventListener("message", function({data}) {
  console.log("INCOMINGGGG!", data);
  // We only accept messages from ourselves
  if (data.handShake != handShake) return;

  console.log("Content script received: ", data);
}, false);

v1.1 With Promise!

function extractGlobal(variableName) {

  const array = new Uint32Array(5);
  const handShake = window.crypto.getRandomValues(array).toString();

  function propagateVariable(handShake, variableName) {
    const message = { handShake };
    message[variableName] = window[variableName];
    window.postMessage(message, "*");
  }

  (function injectPropagator() {
    const script = `( ${propagateVariable.toString()} )('${handShake}', '${variableName}');`
    const scriptTag = document.createElement('script');
    const scriptBody = document.createTextNode(script);

    scriptTag.id = 'chromeExtensionDataPropagator';
    scriptTag.appendChild(scriptBody);
    document.body.append(scriptTag);
  })();

  return new Promise(resolve => {
    window.addEventListener("message", function({data}) {
      // We only accept messages from ourselves
      if (data.handShake != handShake) return;
      resolve(data);
    }, false);
  });
}

extractGlobal('someVariableName').then(data => {
  // Do Work Here
});

Round 2 - Class & Promises

v2.0

I would recommend tossing the class into its own file and exporting it as a default if using es modules. Then it simply becomes:

ExtractPageVariable('someGlobalPageVariable').data.then(pageVar => {
  // Do work here 💪
});

class ExtractPageVariable {
  constructor(variableName) {
    this._variableName = variableName;
    this._handShake = this._generateHandshake();
    this._inject();
    this._data = this._listen();
  }

  get data() {
    return this._data;
  }

  // Private

  _generateHandshake() {
    const array = new Uint32Array(5);
    return window.crypto.getRandomValues(array).toString();
  }

  _inject() {
    function propagateVariable(handShake, variableName) {
      const message = { handShake };
      message[variableName] = window[variableName];
      window.postMessage(message, "*");
    }

    const script = `( ${propagateVariable.toString()} )('${this._handShake}', '${this._variableName}');`
    const scriptTag = document.createElement('script');
    const scriptBody = document.createTextNode(script);

    scriptTag.id = 'chromeExtensionDataPropagator';
    scriptTag.appendChild(scriptBody);
    document.body.append(scriptTag);
  }

  _listen() {
    return new Promise(resolve => {
      window.addEventListener("message", ({data}) => {
        // We only accept messages from ourselves
        if (data.handShake != this._handShake) return;
        resolve(data);
      }, false);
    })
  }
}

const windowData = new ExtractPageVariable('somePageVariable').data;
windowData.then(console.log);
windowData.then(data => {
   // Do work here
});

| improve this answer | | | | |
  • Excellent answer, clearly written, and great to see the process as well as the final result. And it works fantastically, to boot. All-star! – Gifford N. Apr 10 '19 at 15:30
  • 1
    @GiffordN. I was considering wrapping this up into a reusable library and throwing it on npm. – CTS_AE Apr 12 '19 at 1:46
2

This is way late but I just had the same requirement & created a simple standalone class to make getting variable values (or calling functions on objects in the page) really really easy. I used pieces from other answers on this page, which were very useful.

The way it works is to inject a script tag into the page which accesses the variable you want, then it creates a div to hold the serialised version of the value as innerText. It then reads & deserialises this value, deletes the div and script elements it injected, so the dom is back to exactly what it was before.

    var objNativeGetter = {

        divsToTidyup: [],
        DIVID: 'someUniqueDivId',
        _tidyUp: function () {
            console.log(['going to tidy up ', this.divsToTidyup]);
            var el;
            while(el = this.divsToTidyup.shift()) {
                console.log('removing element with ID : ' + el.getAttribute('id'));
                el.parentNode.removeChild(el);
            }
        },

        // create a div to hold the serialised version of what we want to get at
        _createTheDiv: function () {
            var div = document.createElement('div');
            div.setAttribute('id', this.DIVID);
            div.innerText = '';
            document.body.appendChild(div);
            this.divsToTidyup.push(div);
        },

        _getTheValue: function () {
            return JSON.parse(document.getElementById(this.DIVID).innerText);
        },

        // find the page variable from the stringified version of what you would normally use to look in the symbol table
        // eg. pbjs.adUnits would be sent as the string: 'pbjs.adUnits'
        _findTheVar: function (strIdentifier) {
            var script = document.createElement('script');
            script.setAttribute('id', 'scrUnique');
            script.textContent = "\nconsole.log(['going to stringify the data into a div...', JSON.stringify(" + strIdentifier + ")]);\ndocument.getElementById('" + this.DIVID + "').innerText = JSON.stringify(" + strIdentifier + ");\n";
            (document.head||document.documentElement).appendChild(script);
            this.divsToTidyup.push(script);
        },

        // this is the only call you need to make eg.:
        // var val = objNativeGetter.find('someObject.someValue');
        // sendResponse({theValueYouWant: val});
        find: function(strIdentifier) {
            this._createTheDiv();
            this._findTheVar(strIdentifier);
            var ret = this._getTheValue();
            this._tidyUp();
            return ret;
        }
    };

You use it like this:

chrome.runtime.onMessage.addListener(
    function(request, sender, sendResponse) {

        var objNativeGetter = {
        .... the object code, above
        }

        // do some validation, then carefully call objNativeGetter.find(...) with a known string (don't use any user generated or dynamic string - keep tight control over this)
        var val = objNativeGetter.find('somePageObj.someMethod()');
        sendResponse({theValueYouWant: val});
    }
);
| improve this answer | | | | |
1

I actually worked around it using the localStorge API. Note: to use this, our contentscript should be able to read the localStorage. In the manifest.json file, just add the "storage" string:

"permissions": [...,"storage"]

The hijack function lives in the content script:

function hijack(callback) {
    "use strict";
    var code = function() {
      //We have access to topframe - no longer a contentscript          
      var ourLocalStorageObject = {
        globalVar: window.globalVar,
        globalVar2: window.globalVar2
      };
      var dataString = JSON.stringify(ourLocalStorageObject);
      localStorage.setItem("ourLocalStorageObject", dataString);
    };
    var script = document.createElement('script');
    script.textContent = '(' + code + ')()';
    (document.head||document.documentElement).appendChild(script);
    script.parentNode.removeChild(script);
    callback();
  }

Now we can call from the contentscript

document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function(event) { 
    hijack(callback);
});

or if you use jQuery in your contentscript, like I do:

$(document).ready(function() { 
    hijack(callback);
});

to extract the content:

function callback() {
    var localStorageString = localStorage.getItem("ourLocalStorageObject");
    var ourLocalStorageObject= JSON.parse(localStorageString);

    console.log("I can see now on content script", ourLocalStorageObject);
    //(optional cleanup):
    localStorage.removeItem("ourLocalStorageObject");
}

This can be called multiple times, so if your page changes elements or internal code, you can add event listeners to update your extension with the new data.

Edit: I've added callbacks so you can be sure your data won't be invalid (had this issue myself)

| improve this answer | | | | |
  • I think this only gives read-only access to simple variables (as supported by JSON) and can't retrieve window, for example. – fregante Mar 7 '16 at 2:10
  • Since we are sharing the same DOM, this is not necessarily true. Here's why: you have the ability to inject script tags at any time during the contentScript's execution to the actual top frame, that can manipulate the frame's internals. The code in your contentScript.js can therefore be used to communicate with the injected code - and it has window's top frame access. You cannot retrieve a reference to the window object, that is correct, but you can establish a protocol for 'talking' to it in order to pass around functions and data. This is a hacky way of doing it, but it is possible. – Elia Grady Mar 7 '16 at 12:07
  • You can establish the protocol but you still can't pass around that data (circular references and such). What you can do is inject the actual functions that will interact with the dom, but still that's not what your solution outlines — my comment simply expressed the limitations of your solution. – fregante Mar 7 '16 at 15:09
1

If you know which variables you want to access, you can make a quick custom content-script to retrieve their values.

In popup.js :

chrome.tabs.executeScript(null, {code: 'var name = "property"'}, function() {
    chrome.tabs.executeScript(null, {file: "retrieveValue.js"}, function(ret) {
        for (var i = 0; i < ret.length; i++) {
            console.log(ret[i]); //prints out each returned element in the array
        }
    });
});

In retrieveValue.js :

function returnValues() {
    return document.getElementById("element")[name];
    //return any variables you need to retrieve
}
returnValues();

You can modify the code to return arrays or other objects.

| improve this answer | | | | |
1

As explained partially in other answers, the JS variables from the page are isolated from your Chrome extension content script. Normally, there's no way to access them.

But if you inject a JavaScript tag in the page, you will have access to whichever variables are defined there.

I use a utility function to inject my script in the page:

/**
 * inject - Inject some javascript in order to expose JS variables to our content JavaScript
 * @param {string} source - the JS source code to execute
 * Example: inject('(' + myFunction.toString() + ')()');
 */
function inject(source) {
  const j = document.createElement('script'),
    f = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
  j.textContent = source;
  f.parentNode.insertBefore(j, f);
  f.parentNode.removeChild(j);
}

Then you can do:

function getJSvar(whichVar) {
   document.body.setAttribute('data-'+whichVar,whichVar);
}
inject('(' + getJSvar.toString() + ')("somePageVariable")');

var pageVar = document.body.getAttribute('data-somePageVariable');

Note that if the variable is a complex data type (object, array...), you will need to store the value as a JSON string in getJSvar(), and JSON.parse it back in your content script.

| improve this answer | | | | |
  • This is the best option by far – Dalorzo Feb 20 at 23:53
0

No.

Content scripts execute in a special environment called an isolated world. They have access to the DOM of the page they are injected into, but not to any JavaScript variables or functions created by the page. It looks to each content script as if there is no other JavaScript executing on the page it is running on. The same is true in reverse: JavaScript running on the page cannot call any functions or access any variables defined by content scripts.

Isolated worlds allow each content script to make changes to its JavaScript environment without worrying about conflicting with the page or with other content scripts. For example, a content script could include JQuery v1 and the page could include JQuery v2, and they wouldn't conflict with each other.

Another important benefit of isolated worlds is that they completely separate the JavaScript on the page from the JavaScript in extensions. This allows us to offer extra functionality to content scripts that should not be accessible from web pages without worrying about web pages accessing it.

| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 1
    reference link would be very helpful – sublime Dec 30 '14 at 23:46
  • 2
    @sublime Here is the link :-)~ – atupal Jan 2 '15 at 16:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.