17

I have a line of code inside a class's private member variables:

vector<double> dQdt(3)

When compiling in xcode, this gives an error "expected parameter declarator." I think I provided sufficient info. I don't see anything wrong with this declaration.

22

You have to initialize the variable in the constructor's initializer list:

class X 
{
    private:
     vector<double> dQdt;
    public:
     X() : dQdt(3) {}
};
0
16

If you read e.g. this member initialization reference you will learn that default member initialization have to be a brace or equals initializer. I.e. you need to either use curly-braces:

std::vector<double> dQdt{ 0.0, 0.0, 0.0 };

or using the equals character:

std::vector<double> dQdt = std::vector<double>(3);

Since this was introduced with the C++11 standard, you need to enable that in your environment.

4
  • Technically, that isn't the "= operator". I'm not sure what it is, but it is not an operator in an expression. – Martin Bonner supports Monica Sep 18 '16 at 17:05
  • @MartinBonner I know, but I couldn't really phrase it better. Rephrased it anyway. – Some programmer dude Sep 18 '16 at 17:07
  • 1
    But those aren't the same thing. The first creates a single element with value 3. The second creates 3 elements with default initialization (0.0 in this case). – ooga Feb 4 '20 at 22:09
  • @Someprogrammerdude, if you take @Raman's anwser and combine it with your answer, you get the best answer! Then, it would clearly cover all 3 valid techniques: 1) use an initializer list in the class or struct constructor, as @Raman shows, OR 2) use the brace initializer type var{some_default_val}; at the site of the variable declaration (like you show), OR 3) use the equals character type var = some_default-val; (like you also show). – Gabriel Staples May 15 '20 at 8:13
6

The parameter for constructors of data members should be written in the initializer list of your class' constructor. That is, instead of

class Foo {
    vector<double> dQdt(3);
};

You should write

class Foo {
public:
    Foo() : dQdt(3) {}
private:
    vector<double> dQdt;
};
4

As well as initializing in the initializer list of the constructor, you can initialize with a brace initializer list:

class Foo {
    vector<double> dQdt{3};
};

The actual text of the error is because the compiler was expecting you to declare a function, taking an argument of some type, and return the vector<double>. 3 is not a valid declaration of a parameter to a function.

1
  • This will create a vector with a single element 3. Unlike OP's code, which would create 3 zeros if it worked. – HolyBlackCat Jul 4 at 17:56
1

I got this error while trying to compile my C++ code having an initialized vector. Change the () to {} worked for me in the initialization part; Earlier my code looked like this:

    vector<vector<int>> minA(11, vector<int>(11, INT_MAX));

I changed my code to replace circular brackets with curly braces and the error disappered.

    vector<vector<int>> minA{11, vector<int>(11, INT_MAX)};
-1

The question is already answered the following however works as well.
( Which might be more useful to assign initial values. For example 24 times the 42. )

const int default_value = 42;

struct foo
{
    vector<double> hour{vector<double>(24,default_value)};
};

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