9

Consider the following input data in file y.txt (encoded in UTF-8).

bar
föbar

and a file y.pl, which puts the two input lines into an array and processes them, looking for substring start positions.

use open qw(:std :utf8);

my @array;

while (<>) {
  push @array, $_;
  print $-[0] . "\n" if /bar/;
}

# $array[0] = "bar", $array[1] = "föbar"
print $-[0] . "\n" if $array[1] =~ /$array[0]/u;

If I call perl y.pl < y.txt, I get

0
2
3

as the output. However, I would expect that the last number is 2 also, but for some reason the second /.../ regexp behaves differently. What am I missing? I guess it's an encoding issue, but whatever I tried, I didn't succeed. This is Perl 5.18.2.

4
  • On Perl 5.22.2 under Cygwin it works for me. Sep 19 '16 at 5:43
  • Works on Perl 5.20.1 on x86_64-linux (CentOS 6) Sep 19 '16 at 5:52
  • Works fine under v5.22.1 [Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS] Sep 19 '16 at 5:55
  • Thanks for testing. So it seems to be a bug in 5.18.2... Bad... Any ideas how to circumvent the problem elegantly?
    – lemzwerg
    Sep 19 '16 at 6:01
2

It appears to be a bug in 5.18.

$ 5.18.2t/bin/perl a.pl a
0
2
3

$ 5.20.1t/bin/perl a.pl a
0
2
2

I can't find a workaround. Adding utf8::downgrade($array[0]); or utf8::downgrade($array[0], 1); works in the case you presented, but not using the following data or any other where the interpolated pattern contains characters >255.

♠bar
f♠♠bar

It appears that this can only be fixed by upgrading your Perl, which is actually quite simple. (Just make sure to install it to a different directory than your system perl by following the instructions in INSTALL!)

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