I am writing a simple text game in C++. The user has the option of choosing the left room or the right room. I did have this set up as an int statement: enter 1 for left, enter 2 for right. Now I would like to have the user enter left for left room, right for right room.

I replaced the int with char, but I am getting an error.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() {

    char decision;
    cin >> decision;

    if (decision == left) {
        cout << "went left" << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

Error: comparison between pointer and integer

closed as off-topic by πάντα ῥεῖ, Lightness Races in Orbit, NathanOliver, Rakete1111, karthik Sep 19 '16 at 16:21

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  • 2
  • Did you read the error? And look up "How to get char () from a user" if you want it as a char, or declare decision as an int if you want it as int – Khalil Khalaf Sep 19 '16 at 12:26
  • the error reads "Comparison between pointer and integer ('int' and 'std::__1::iOS_base & (*)(std::__1::iOS_base&)') – thejdah Sep 19 '16 at 12:30
  • Show the code. Enough code that when it's compiled it shows the error; nothing more. – Pete Becker Sep 19 '16 at 12:34
  • #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) { char decision; cout << "You enter the dungeon. There is a door way to the right, and a door way to the left." " For left door enter Left. For right door enter right" << endl; cin >> decision; if(decision == left) – thejdah Sep 19 '16 at 12:35
up vote 0 down vote accepted
  1. char stands for a single character - what you need is a string (multiple characters).

  2. when you actually have the user's value in decision you need to compare it to the string "left" rather than just left which the compiler tries to interpret as a symbol (like a variable name).

All in all:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main() {

    string decision;
    cin >> decision;

    if (decision == "left") {
        cout << "went left" << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
  • I think he in his case doesn't need getline but only >> operator because he only needs "right" or "left"; no white spaces assumed – Raindrop7 Sep 19 '16 at 13:03
  • @Raindrop7 thx, i updated the answer (it didn't compile for me cause I used the wrong direction of >> so I thought cin's operator>> didn't exist for strings). – Arnon Zilca Sep 19 '16 at 13:24
  • @Amon Zilca you're welcome!. extraction operator (>>) works with strings but stops reading when reaching the first white space or the end of line. I compiled your very code and it works – Raindrop7 Sep 19 '16 at 13:38

the easiest way use strcmp:

#include <iostream>


int main()
{

    char decision[50] = "";
    std::cout << "Decision: ";
    std::cin.get(decision, 50, '\n');

    if( !(strcmp(decision, "left")) )
        std::cout << "left";
    else
        if( !(strcmp(decision, "right")) )
            std::cout << "right";
    else
        std::cout << "bad input!" << std::endl;

    std::cout << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
  • you should also make no difference between lowercase and uppercase because if a user enters "Left" instead "left" then it won't work

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