0

I have the following program.

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    char a='b';
    int b=11299;
    char d[4]="abc";
    printf("value of a is %d\n",a);
    printf("value of b is %c\n",b);
    printf("value of c is %d\n",*d);
    char *c=d;
    c=c+1;
    printf("c is %d\n",*c);
}

I am little confused with %d format specifier. I was thinking that it would print 4 bytes of data. But from the above program (first and last printf) it is evident that it prints only one byte when a char parameter is used. Why does %d print only one byte? How does it know how many bytes to print?

4
  • This is the basic MSVC page about printf format specifiers, and contains links to more detail, such as width. The plain %d specifier prints the given argument as int using as many digits as necessary. Sep 19, 2016 at 15:26
  • When a is being passed to printf() it gets promoted to int by the compiler.
    – alk
    Sep 19, 2016 at 15:31
  • the char is promoted to int. Sep 19, 2016 at 15:31
  • It neither prints 1 byte nor 4 bytes. According to %d, it expects and prints an int value. Similar for %c (well, char actually is a byte, so ...) Sep 19, 2016 at 15:56

2 Answers 2

3

It doesn't print bytes; it prints values -- the value you pass as the corresponding argument -- provided the value passed has the right type.

In your example 1, the argument is the value 'b'. It initially has type char (because the expression a has type char) but variadic arguments are subject to default promotions, which promote any integer type with lower rank than int up to int. Thus, as an argument, the type is int.

In your example 3, the argument is the value 'a'. Likewise it initially has type char (because the expression *d has type char) but it gets promoted to int.

If promotions didn't happen and the types were wrong, though, printf still wouldn't "print fewer bytes". Your program would just have undefined behavior (so anything could happen). For example:

int a = 42;
printf("%lld\n", a); // undefined behavior because int does not
                     // get promoted implicitly to long long.

In your example 2, the %c format specifier expects an argument of type int; printf converts it to unsigned char and prints the corresponding character. Any value of int is acceptable; it doesn't have to already be a value in the range of unsigned char.

0

First, you're probably declaration specifying the ISO C90, and this forbids mixed declarations and code, as shown in the warning. The statement pointer of type char c varible char * c = d; must be made for example of the statement string d char d [4] = "abc"; and not in the middle of the code. Second: int main (){ function does not return anything, but this must specify to not pull warning.

The revised program would be:

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    char a='b';
    int b=11299;
    char d[4]="abc";
    char *c=d;
    printf("value of a is %d\n",a);
    printf("value of b is %c\n",b);
    printf("value of c is %d\n",*d);
    c=c+1;
    printf("c is %d\n",*c);
    return 0;
 }
1
  • Err, how does this answer the question?
    – alk
    Sep 19, 2016 at 17:23

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