9

[edit]

*I was newbie when asked. This is the answer:

Future.fromTry(Try( 1/0 ))

Other thing that worth knowing (and might miss-lead me while checking):

Future.successful( 1/0 )

Will throw once reached. Future.successful and Future.failure are not just a convenient way to create a Future, they are also skipping the execution context loop and are evaluated sequentially.


[The original question]

I have a Try that throws Exception. I want that Try to become a Future so I will be able to recoverWith.

please don't guess if you dont know.

The question is, how do convert Try to Future without handling any exception in the Try (just in the Future with recover)?

note that Await is needed to test the result of your future

The code sample demonstrates what I had in mind but it also throws once reached (new RuntimeException("-------failed-------") is what I get)

val t = Try(throw new RuntimeException("my"))

val resF : Future[String] = if (t.isSuccess)
  Future.successful(t.get)
else
  Future.failed(new RuntimeException("-------failed-------"))

val resFWithRecover = resF.recoverWith{
  case NonFatal(e) =>
    Future.successful("recoveredWith")
}
Await.result(resFWithRecover, Duration("5s"))
  • What is your question? – Michael Zajac Sep 19 '16 at 20:57
  • @m-z I've edit to be more clear – ozma Sep 19 '16 at 21:13
19

... how do convert Try to Future without handling any exception in the Try?

Use Future.fromTry.

scala> val t = Try(throw new RuntimeException("my"))
t: scala.util.Try[Nothing] = Failure(java.lang.RuntimeException: my)

scala> val resF = Future.fromTry(t)
resF: scala.concurrent.Future[Nothing] = scala.concurrent.impl.Promise$KeptPromise@57cf54e1

scala> resF.recoverWith{
     |   case NonFatal(e) =>
     |     Future.successful("recoveredWith")
     | }
res5: scala.concurrent.Future[String] = scala.concurrent.impl.Promise$DefaultPromise@1b75c2e3
  • running: val res = Await.result(resF, Duration("1s")) , will throw the exception – ozma Sep 20 '16 at 4:37
  • 1
    @ozma, don't Await on resF. Instead await of what recoverWith returns. In other words, val resRW = resF.recoverWith{...}, and then Await.result(resRW, .... – jwvh Sep 20 '16 at 7:08
  • @jwvh that is what I do (added it to the code sample now) – ozma Sep 20 '16 at 8:19
  • @ozma, your code sample doesn't use the fromTry() as m-z has suggested. My tests indicate that m-z's code works. You just have to Await on the proper Future, i.e. not the one returned from fromTry() but the one returned from recoverWith() after fromTry(). – jwvh Sep 20 '16 at 8:29
  • @ozma First of all, why bother using Futures if you're just going to block with Await? That makes no sense. Second, if you're going to use Await, you need to do it on the last Future, that is, the result of calling recoverWith. In my example you would await on res5, not resF. i.e. Await.result(resF.recoverWith { ... }, Duration.Inf). Futures are immutable. Recovering resF does not change resF, it creates a new Future. – Michael Zajac Sep 20 '16 at 12:17
1

There's no need to introduce Future if all you want to do is to use recoverWith (kind of like flatMap) on your Try object.

You could so something like the following:

val t = Try[String](throw new RuntimeException("my"))
val u = t.recoverWith{
  case e => Success(s"ignoring exception ${e.getLocalizedMessage}")
}
u.foreach(println(_))

This results in the following output to the console:

ignoring exception my
  • Thanks, but that was not my question. I need to keep an interface that returns Future and I need it to behave like one. – ozma Sep 20 '16 at 4:39
1
 // you need to provide your try with type information in lhs
 // as the rhs is not providing any type info
 val t: Try[String] = Try(throw new RuntimeException("my"))

 // Now you can easily get a Future[String] from this Try[String]
 val f = Future.fromTry(t)

 // or you can use pattern matching
 val f2 = t match {
   case Success(str) => Future.succesful(str)
   case Failure(ex) => Future.failed(ex)
 }
  • I guess, you meant "f2 = f match {...". It did not compile for me. please add the complete example with the right imports. thanks. – ozma Sep 20 '16 at 18:44
0

You can recoverWith on Try also

Use map and recover methods on Try to produce Future.successful and Future.failed respectively and then get on Try

val future = 
 Try {
   throw new Exception("explosion")
 }.map { result =>
   Future.successful(result)
 }.recover { case th =>
   Future.failed(th)
 }.get

Using Pattern Matching

val future =  
 Try {
  throw new Exception("something")
 } match {
  case Success(value) => Future.successful(value)
  case Failure(th) => Future.failed(th)
 }
  • please "doSomething()" that "throw" and you not get passed the "}.get" – ozma Sep 19 '16 at 21:15
  • thanks. now add recoverWith to that future and "Await". you will still have an exception rather than the recoverd – ozma Sep 20 '16 at 4:45

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