3

I have an index action within my user controller, wherein I am trying to do two things, in a row, and not execute the desired res.json() method until they have both had a chance to complete.

I have a friendship join model which joins users. One column is frienderId and one column is friendedId. In the below index function, the desired outcome is that I will end up with a SINGLE user object, which is a friend. The reason there are to promises below is because the user could either be in the frienderId column, or the friendedId column, so I am having to essentially parse through both possible situations for req.user's friends.

The problem is that the final thing being returned, I.E. res.json(result), is always returning the correct friend, however, it always returns with an empty array [] either BEFORE the desired object, or after it. I know this empty array is coming from one of the two promise scenarios where no result was found. Is there some type of method instead of resolve like sayyy..reject? Wherein if called, the entire promise won't be pushed to the promise array? Then I could just test for if (!friended) {reject} or if (!friender) {reject}

I understand that .each is enumerating through each promise and giving the result of each. However, I do not want the result of each promise, I just want to access the side effect of each promise running.

Thanks!

index: function(req, res) {
    var promiseArray = [];

    promiseArray.push(new Promise(function(resolve) {
      user.findById(req.user.id).then(function(user) {
        user.getFrienders({
          where: {
            username: req.body.username
          }
        }).then(function(friender) {
          resolve(friender[0])
        })
      })
    }));

    promiseArray.push(new Promise(function(resolve) {
      user.findById(req.user.id).then(function(user) {
        user.getFriendeds({
          where: {
            username: req.body.username
          }
        }).then(function(friended) {
          resolve(friended[0])
        })
      })
    }));

    Sequelize.Promise.map(promiseArray, function(result) {
      res.json(result);
    });
}
  • Another weird thing is that when I, instead of simply res.json(result) at the very bottom, add an undefined variable under var promiseArray at the very top, called var friend, then console.log(friend) in the Sequelize.Promise.map function at the end, the result is TWO values.. The first is undefined, then the second is the correct friend object, or vice versa depending on the column that the user exists in (frienderId or friendedId). Very confused as to how in the world console logging a single variable can result in two totally separate values being logged, one right after the other. Thx. – user6823414 Sep 19 '16 at 23:02
  • Hey bro, it would be great if you could ask some follow up questions to my post if you need more clarification, or else up-vote and accept if my answer has helped you. – Hayden Braxton Sep 21 '16 at 12:06
2

First off, your use of Promise is a little redundant. Since the findById() function returns a promise, all you need to do is handle it. You don't need to create a new Promise. You can just say promiseArray.push(user.findById ...). You're almost using then properly. The function passed into then is what will be called when the promise is resolved, in this case, after the findById function has completed and returned a value. then itself returns a promise that is resolved with the value that its callback returns. So whatever value you want to end up in promiseArray when all is done, I assume friended[0] or friender[0] you just need to return that value in your last then function. Inside the first then function, you should also say return user.findFriends( ...

What you need to do next is handle the case where the promise returned from the findById functions is rejected. You can do that in two ways. First, you can pass a second callback to then that will be called in the case the promise is rejected, with the reason for reject as its argument. Instead of passing two functions into then, you can follow then with catch, which is what I prefer to do personally, and pass your rejection callback to catch. catch also returns a promise that is resolved with the value returned from its callback. You can choose to return the reason passed in, or whatever value you want. So in the case that the error is rejected, whatever catch returns is what will end up in your promises array.

It might do you some good to read over the documentation for promises. Admittedly, I know I had some difficulty with promises when I first started, but after going through the documentation and working out examples, you get the hand of it and see how useful promises are.

If it were me, this is how I would refactor the code

    var frienderPromise = user.findById(req.user.id)
          .then(function(user) {
            return user.getFrienders({
              where: { username: req.body.username }
            });
          })
          .then(function (friender) {
            return friender[0];
          })
          .catch(function (reason) {
            return reason; // or whatever else you want to end up in the promisesArray on rejection
          });

    var friendedPromise = user.findById(req.user.id)
          .then(function(user) {
            return user.getFriendeds({
              where: { username: req.body.username }
            });
          })
          .then(function (friended) {
            return friended[0];
          })
          .catch(function (reason) {
            return reason;
          });

    promiseArray.push(frienderPromise);
    promiseArray.push(friendedPromise);

You can keep everything else the same. At the end, you can still call Sequalize as you have currently. Although it should be return Sequalize.... You might also consider using Promise.filter instead of .map if you don't want to keep the bad results. So you could do something like

    return Sequelize.Promise.filter(promiseArray, function(result) {
      if (/* make sure it's result you want */)
        res.json(result);
    });

Personally, I would go a step further and remove all of the promise business into another function that does nothing with res and finish it off with

    return Sequelize.Promise.filter(promiseArray, function(result) {
      return result === /* result you want */;
    });

Then once inside your index function, you could could call

    return friendsPromiseFunction().then(function (results) {
      res.json(results);
    })

It would make things much cleaner. Hope this helps. Let me know if you have questions.

  • I ended up not using the Bluebird Promise methods and instead just going with the regular sequelize promise chain. This process has been an experiment for me and I didn't realize that I could do a query on FRIENDED, then simply use a .then call and do the same query for FRIENDER, and then I'd be good to go. I was then able to access both FRIENDED and FRIENDER as return values a couple queries down the promise chain with no problems. Thanks for the help! Upvoted. – user6823414 Sep 25 '16 at 20:21

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