49

If the two Int arrays are, a = [1;2;3] and b = [4;5;6], how do we concatenate the two arrays in both the dimensions? The expected outputs are,

julia> out1
6-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6

julia> out2
3x2 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  4
 2  5
 3  6
1

5 Answers 5

48

Use the vcat and hcat functions:

julia> a, b = [1;2;3], [4;5;6]
([1,2,3],[4,5,6])

help?> vcat
Base.vcat(A...)

   Concatenate along dimension 1

julia> vcat(a, b)
6-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6

help?> hcat
Base.hcat(A...)

   Concatenate along dimension 2

julia> hcat(a, b)
3x2 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  4
 2  5
 3  6
34

Square brackets can be used for concatenation:

julia> a, b = [1;2;3], [4;5;6]
([1,2,3],[4,5,6])

julia> [a; b]
6-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6

julia> [a b]
3×2 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  4
 2  5
 3  6
3
  • 3
    This is syntactic sugar for vcat and hcat respectively: [e.head for e in [:([a; b]), :([a b])]] # Symbol[:vcat,:hcat] Commented Sep 20, 2016 at 7:00
  • 13
    Generally I think vcat and hcat should be preferred because this solution is whitespace sensitive. For example: [a - b] will vcat while [a -b] will hcat. That can be a nasty bug to find. Commented Sep 20, 2016 at 7:29
  • 7
    It seems a bit backward to not prefer the syntactic sugar version. After all, what's the sugar for? Are you saying that this syntax will probably be removed?
    – DNF
    Commented Sep 20, 2016 at 10:19
17

You can use the cat function to concatenate any number of arrays along any dimension. The first input is the dimension over which to perform the concatenation; the remaining inputs are all of the arrays you wish to concatenate together

a = [1;2;3]
b = [4;5;6]

## Concatenate 2 arrays along the first dimension
cat(1,a,b)
6-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6

## Concatenate 2 arrays along the second dimension
cat(2,a,b)
3x2 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  4
 2  5
 3  6

## Concatenate 2 arrays along the third dimension
cat(3,a,b)
3x1x2 Array{Int64,3}:
[:, :, 1] =
 1
 2
 3

[:, :, 2] =
 4
 5
 6
1
  • 5
    More recent versions would require the dims keyword, e.g. cat(a,b,dims=3) Commented Apr 14, 2020 at 9:39
2

when encountered Array{Array,1}, the grammer is a little bit different, like this:

julia> a=[[1,2],[3,4]]
2-element Array{Array{Int64,1},1}:
 [1, 2]
 [3, 4]

julia> vcat(a)
2-element Array{Array{Int64,1},1}:
 [1, 2]
 [3, 4]

julia> hcat(a)
2×1 Array{Array{Int64,1},2}:
 [1, 2]
 [3, 4]

julia> vcat(a...)
4-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3
 4

julia> hcat(a...)
2×2 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  3
 2  4

ref:

... combines many arguments into one argument in function definitions In the context of function definitions, the ... operator is used to combine many different arguments into a single argument. This use of ... for combining many different arguments into a single argument is called slurping

2

Functional way to concatanate 2 arrays is to use reduce function.

a = rand(10, 1)
b = rand(10, 1)
c = reduce(hcat, [a, b])
1
  • 1
    For two arrays it's not that important, but when you want to concatenate multiple arrays, this method is an enormous performance gain over hcat(arrays...).
    – KeithWM
    Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 21:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.