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While converting my .NET 4.5 library to .NETStandard v1.6 I ran into a failing unit test which used to pass before.

I pinpointed the problem to the following three lines of code:

ParameterExpression arg1 = Expression.Parameter( typeof( DateTime ), "arg1" );
ParameterExpression arg2 = Expression.Parameter( typeof( DateTime ), "arg2" );
var test = Expression.Subtract( arg1, arg2 );

This expression tree compiles for .NET 4.5, but throws an InvalidOperationException in .NETStandard v1.6:

The binary operator Subtract is not defined for the types 'System.DateTime' and 'System.DateTime'.

However, for both targets the following code works:

DateTime one = new DateTime();
DateTime two = new DateTime();
TimeSpan difference = one - two;

I thus would expect the expression trees to compile for .NET Core as well? Am I doing something wrong, or is this a bug in .NET Core?

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3

It's a bug in System.Linq.Expressions assembly.

These methods are used to find the Subtract operator method:

public static MethodInfo GetAnyStaticMethodValidated(this Type type, string name, Type[] types)
{
    // Method name is "op_Subtraction" in your case
    MethodInfo anyStaticMethod = type.GetAnyStaticMethod(name);
    // DateTime and DateTime in your case
    if (!anyStaticMethod.MatchesArgumentTypes(types))
    {
        return null;
    }
    return anyStaticMethod;
}

public static MethodInfo GetAnyStaticMethod(this Type type, string name)
{
    foreach (MethodInfo current in type.GetRuntimeMethods())
    {
        if (current.IsStatic && current.Name == name)
        {
            return current;
        }
    }
    return null;
}

As you see, the GetAnyStaticMethod picks randomly the first "op_Subtraction" method from DateTime, instead of looping through all available, where DateTime has two of such operator methods:

public static DateTime operator -(DateTime d, TimeSpan t);
public static TimeSpan operator -(DateTime d1, DateTime d2);

So the code picks the wrong one that takes in DateTime and TimeSpan, then just fails because input types don't match.

In .NET 4.5 they do search in a proper way by passing argument types:

Type[] types = new Type[]
{
    leftType, // DateTime in your case
    rightType // DateTime in your case
};
BindingFlags bindingAttr = BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic;
// Method name is "op_Subtraction" in your case
MethodInfo methodInfo = nonNullableType.GetMethodValidated(name, bindingAttr, null, types, null);
3
  • Awesome. to you the honor of reporting the exact issue on the github project. :) I will update the issue to point out you found the exact reason behind it. – Steven Jeuris Sep 20 '16 at 19:36
  • I might consider it later if nobody that has actual experience with this jumps on it instantly. First I want to continue migrating my library (including finding a workaround for this). :) – Steven Jeuris Sep 20 '16 at 19:41
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    The work around is quite simple: find the right operator method by yourself and pass as the third arg to the overloaded Expression.Subtract method – Serge Semenov Sep 20 '16 at 19:43
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This is indeed a bug in the implementation of .NET Core. The reason is that certain APIs were not avaiable in .NET Core when System.Linq.Expressions was ported to core, so a custom implementation was developed and this was never caught.

I've sent a PR to dotnet/corefx to fix this. For the curious, the problem was that the method finding the operator loops through the methods, but breaks out of the loop when it finds a match, before checking that the method is the one we want. The fix is to move parameter checking inside the loop, e.g.

        internal static MethodInfo GetAnyStaticMethodValidated(
        this Type type,
        string name,
        Type[] types)
    {
        foreach (var method in type.GetRuntimeMethods())
        {
            if (method.IsStatic && method.Name == name && method.MatchesArgumentTypes(types))
            {
                return method;
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
3
  • Not too certain since I can't see the full codebase here, but does this also verify the return type? Or, I suppose since you can't overload on return type there is no need to check for this. :) Just want to double check the pull request covers all angles. Might also be interesting to add some unit tests for this since this went uncaught before. – Steven Jeuris Sep 21 '16 at 16:52
  • Oh, I see you did add a unit test. So this code should probably also cover DateTime - TimeSpan, ... correct? – Steven Jeuris Sep 21 '16 at 16:54
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    Thanks for taking a look. I added another unit test – H Bellamy Sep 21 '16 at 18:21

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