I don't see why this is not working, I can do a direct cast from double to decimal with no problem, but unexpectedly I can't do this cast if it is inside a generic class, this snippet explains it better:

public class TestCollection<T>
{
    public void Add(object value)
    {
        //When T is decimal, then I get 
        // System.InvalidCastException
        var t = (T) value;
    }
}

public void Main ()
{
    var t = new TestCollection<decimal> ();
    double doub = 10;

    var decim = (decimal) doub; //Works!       
    t.Add(doub);                //throws!
}

System.InvalidCastException was unhandled by user code HResult=-2147467262 Message=Specified cast is not valid. Source=Wpf StackTrace: at Wpf.TestCollection`1.Add(Object value) in C:\Users\btord\Source\Repos\Live-Charts\Examples\Wpf\JimmyTheTestsGuy.xaml.cs:line 15 at Wpf.JimmyTheTestsGuy..ctor() in C:\Users\btord\Source\Repos\Live-Charts\Examples\Wpf\JimmyTheTestsGuy.xaml.cs:line 35 at Wpf.MainWindow..ctor() in C:\Users\btord\Source\Repos\Live-Charts\Examples\Wpf\MainWindow.xaml.cs:line 56 InnerException:

  • This happens because you pass the object, not double. – steryd Sep 20 '16 at 18:35
  • 2
    Why is the type of value object and not T? – Lee Sep 20 '16 at 18:37
  • @Lee I have 2 overloads, one for T and one for object, I get the error when the object overload is called, this is a small part of the code – bto.rdz Sep 20 '16 at 18:37
up vote 5 down vote accepted

It fails due to the exact same reason why the following fails:

short s = 1;
object o = s;
var i = (int)o; //Runtime error

The reason being that a boxed value can only be unboxed to its real type. In your case your are boxing a double and trying to unbox it to a decimal. That is not allowed.

I'd push back on the whole design. You have a generic collection of Ts. Your Add method should simply accept Ts and let the caller carry the burden of converting to the right type. If that's not a valid solution then get rid of generics all together and simply implement a collection of objects.

  • I see, thanks, any ideas to find a workaround? – bto.rdz Sep 20 '16 at 18:35
  • @bto.rdz public void Add(dynamic value) seems to work, if you're OK with dynamic. – Quantic Sep 20 '16 at 18:36
  • @bto.rdz see update to my answer. – InBetween Sep 20 '16 at 18:41
  • @InBetween makes sense, thanks. – bto.rdz Sep 20 '16 at 18:43

You could use Convert.ChangeType for that:

public void Add(object value)
{
    var t = Convert.ChangeType(value, typeof(T));
}

See the fiddle: https://dotnetfiddle.net/0Tfgyz

  • Thanks, I am worried about the perfomance with this method, since this method is really important in my code – bto.rdz Sep 20 '16 at 18:41
  • Ok. Maybe you should profile it first to see if it is a no go. Just found a stackoverflow answer which deals with the performance of ChangeType: stackoverflow.com/questions/1532197/… – Nico Sep 20 '16 at 18:45

If you need object insead of T you can use dynamic in your Add method.

 public void Add(object value)
 {
      //When T is decimal, then I get 
      // System.InvalidCastException
      dynamic t1 = value;
      var t = (T)t1;
 }

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