6

I have a notebook cell containing JavaScript code, and I would like the code to select this particular cell. Unfortunately, the behavior of get_selected_cell depends on whether I execute the cell in place, or execute and select the cell below.

Example:

%%javascript
var cell = Jupyter.notebook.get_selected_cell();
console.log(Jupyter.notebook.find_cell_index(cell));

When executing this cell, the console output will be different whether I execute with Ctrl+Enter or Shift+Enter. In one case it logs the index of the cell that contains the JavaScript code, in the other the index of the cell below.

Is there a way to select the cell I want?

3
  • 1
    selected_cell means the one that is selected in the UI. Inside Javascript added to the output area of a cell, this is the output area. I can't currently find a way back from that to the cell it belongs to, though. – Thomas K Sep 21 '16 at 13:37
  • @ThomasK thanks, I guess it's not possible then... – IanS Sep 21 '16 at 16:19
  • 1
    I suspect it probably is possible with some convoluted JS hackery, but I don't know how. Feel free to open a feature request on the notebook repo for an official way to reference the cell from JS output. – Thomas K Sep 21 '16 at 21:14
7

Your Javascript will have a handle on the OutputArea applying the Javascript, but not one all the way to the cell (in general, output areas can be used without cells or notebooks). You can find the cell by identifying the parent .cell element, and then getting the cell corresponding to that element:

%%javascript
var output_area = this;
// find my cell element
var cell_element = output_area.element.parents('.cell');
// which cell is it?
var cell_idx = Jupyter.notebook.get_cell_elements().index(cell_element);
// get the cell object
var cell = Jupyter.notebook.get_cell(cell_idx);
0
2

In the case of executing javascript with display(HTML("javascript code")), this will return the Window object.

So you should use display(Javascript("javascript code")) to get the current cells' output_area.

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