1667

I want to center a div vertically with CSS. I don't want tables or JavaScript, but only pure CSS. I found some solutions, but all of them are missing Internet Explorer 6 support.

<body>
    <div>Div to be aligned vertically</div>
</body>

How can I center a div vertically in all major browsers, including Internet Explorer 6?

2

50 Answers 50

1558

Below is the best all-around solution I could build to vertically and horizontally center a fixed-width, flexible height content box. It was tested and worked for recent versions of Firefox, Opera, Chrome, and Safari.

.outer {
  display: table;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  height: 100%;
  width: 100%;
}

.middle {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
}

.inner {
  margin-left: auto;
  margin-right: auto;
  width: 400px;
  /* Whatever width you want */
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="middle">
    <div class="inner">
      <h1>The Content</h1>
      <p>Once upon a midnight dreary...</p>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

View A Working Example With Dynamic Content

I built in some dynamic content to test the flexibility and would love to know if anyone sees any problems with it. It should work well for centered overlays also -- lightbox, pop-up, etc.

0
368

The simplest way would be the following three lines of CSS:

1) position: relative;

2) top: 50%;

3) transform: translateY(-50%);

Following is an example:

div.outer-div {
  height: 170px;
  width: 300px;
  background-color: lightgray;
}

div.middle-div {
  position: relative;
  top: 50%;
  -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
  -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
  transform: translateY(-50%);
}
<div class='outer-div'>
  <div class='middle-div'>
    Test text
  </div>
</div>

8
  • 6
    note: doesn't work correct if the height of the outer div is set with "min-height: 170px"
    – Bart Burg
    Commented Aug 14, 2015 at 9:10
  • 4
    Interferes with z-index
    – ripper234
    Commented Nov 12, 2016 at 19:48
  • 7
    doesn't work when height of outer div is 100%. Then only works with position: absolute;. Commented Apr 13, 2018 at 8:01
  • 1
    I had found this solution elsewhere first, but extra kudos to this particular answer for mentioning the -webkit-transform variant in particular, which I needed to make this method work in phantomjs... ended hours of struggling so thank you!
    – drmrbrewer
    Commented Oct 23, 2018 at 11:02
  • 2
    This is the best answer. This is incredibly simple, messes with the least amount of existing work and functions on everything as far back as IE9 which nobody even uses anymore. Lets get this guy some more upvotes! Commented Jun 20, 2019 at 18:40
311

One more I can't see on the list:

.Center-Container {
  position: relative;
  height: 100%;
}

.Absolute-Center {
  width: 50%;
  height: 50%;
  overflow: auto;
  margin: auto;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0; left: 0; bottom: 0; right: 0;
  border: solid black;
}
  • Cross-browser (including Internet Explorer 8 - Internet Explorer 10 without hacks!)
  • Responsive with percentages and min-/max-
  • Centered regardless of padding (without box-sizing!)
  • height must be declared (see Variable Height)
  • Recommended setting overflow: auto to prevent content spillover (see Overflow)

Source: Absolute Horizontal And Vertical Centering In CSS

0
238

Now the Flexbox solution is a very easy way for modern browsers, so I recommend this for you:

.container {
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
  justify-content: center;
  height: 100%;
  background: green;
}

body,
html {
  height: 100%;
}
<div class="container">
  <div>Div to be aligned vertically</div>
</div>

7
  • 7
    If you've got a navbar, you can tweak the height using height: calc(100% - 55px) or whatever the height of your navbar is.
    – Adrian
    Commented Sep 4, 2017 at 15:33
  • i also had to remove margins/padding from body
    – Ben
    Commented Apr 21, 2018 at 22:14
  • Works well with float. Thanks. Commented Sep 15, 2019 at 12:04
  • Please note that this will potentially behave weird on "newer older" mobile safari browsers. The recommended use instead of height is flex-basis on the .container class Commented Oct 29, 2019 at 13:34
  • 1
    To get rid of the vertical scrollbar, I had to also include body { margin: 0; }, as mentioned here. Commented May 12, 2021 at 3:02
145

Actually, you need two div's for vertical centering. The div containing the content must have a width and height.

#container {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  margin-top: -200px;
  /* Half of #content height */
  left: 0;
  width: 100%;
}

#content {
  width: 624px;
  margin-left: auto;
  margin-right: auto;
  height: 395px;
  border: 1px solid #000000;
}
<div id="container">
  <div id="content">
    <h1>Centered div</h1>
  </div>
</div>

Here is the result.

2
  • 4
    it's an old trick... top 50% and the top margin negative half the height for the inner div
    – Manatax
    Commented Sep 5, 2013 at 21:46
  • 39
    it's assuming you have a fixed height for div. don't work when div can change height. Commented Sep 23, 2013 at 12:22
85

Edit 2020: only use this if you need to support old browsers like Internet Explorer 8 (which you should refuse to do 😉). If not, use Flexbox.


This is the simplest method I found and I use it all the time (jsFiddle demo here).

Thank Chris Coyier from CSS Tricks for this article.

html, body{
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
}
.v-wrap{
    height: 100%;
    white-space: nowrap;
    text-align: center;
}
.v-wrap:before{
    content: "";
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    width: 0;
    /* adjust for white space between pseudo element and next sibling */
    margin-right: -.25em;
    /* stretch line height */
    height: 100%;
}
.v-box{
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    white-space: normal;
}
<div class="v-wrap">
    <article class="v-box">
        <p>This is how I've been doing it for some time</p>
    </article>
</div>

Support starts with Internet Explorer 8.

1
  • Refusing support for old browsers, the solution for me was not flexbox but grid system. It was a bit annoying for me center content in a container that, when it becames too small in height, needed to show scrollbar, and the centered content was loosing out the scroll area with all other methods. In the container i just use: { display: grid; align-items: center; } Hope this helps someone.
    – tomasofen
    Commented May 30, 2020 at 2:51
80

After a lot of research I finally found the ultimate solution. It works even for floated elements. View Source

.element {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translateY(-50%); /* or try 50% */
}
3
  • 5
    This does works really well, provided you remember that the container element must have an implicit or explicit height; jsfiddle.net/14kt53un A minor gotcha to those who are relatively new to CSS. Commented Jul 19, 2015 at 11:05
  • 7
    Out of all the answers, this is the most simplest! I hope others see your answer too! Thank you! By the way, 50% worked for me (not -50%) Commented Jan 8, 2017 at 14:13
  • That was incredible. After hours of searching, this one worked for me. I had to use translateY(50%) I am sure why, but it worked. In my case, the parent was created by AEM Forms Engine, and I can only control certain child elements.
    – tarekahf
    Commented May 10, 2020 at 18:30
68

html, body {
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0;
}

body {
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
}
<div>This is centered vertically</div>

1
  • 12
    Note justify-content: center will center items horizontally as well
    – Peter Berg
    Commented Apr 6, 2017 at 20:04
39

To center the div on a page, check the fiddle link.

#vh {
    margin: auto;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    right: 0;
}
.box{
    border-radius: 15px;
    box-shadow: 0 0 8px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4);
    padding: 25px;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background: white;
}
<div id="vh" class="box">Div to be aligned vertically</div>

Another option is to use flex box, check the fiddle link.

.vh {
    background-color: #ddd;
    height: 400px;
    align-items: center;
    display: flex;
}
.vh > div {
    width: 100%;
    text-align: center;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
<div class="vh">
    <div>Div to be aligned vertically</div>
</div>

Another option is to use a CSS 3 transform:

#vh {
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    left: 50%;
    /*transform: translateX(-50%) translateY(-50%);*/
    transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
}
.box{
    border-radius: 15px;
    box-shadow: 0 0 8px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4);
    padding: 25px;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background: white;
}
<div id="vh" class="box">Div to be aligned vertically</div>

4
  • 3
    @ArmelLarcier That's incorrect. Relative units are percentages %, ems and rems. Absolute or fixed values are pixels or points. What you're referring to is "it only works with a declared height". Howevever, although this method described by Moes does require a height, when you declare it in relative units, percentage is the best, no matter how much content is inside the centered DIV that DIV will expand vertically to fit its content. That's the beauty of this method. The other good thing is that this method works in IE8/9/10 in case someone still needs to support those browsers. Commented Jan 14, 2015 at 4:45
  • @ricardozea I don't mean to play stubborn but saying the centered div will expand vertically while remaining vertically centered is wrong. Try it. I know when I say the height must be "fixed", that it's not the right word. It is indeed relative, to its parent. Anyway I think Chris Coyer's method makes more sense, see my answer stackoverflow.com/a/21919578/1491212 It's compatible with IE8 AND does work on an element with no specified dimensions. Commented Jan 14, 2015 at 20:23
  • 1
    @ArmelLarcier It's all good. Is not wrong brother. Try it: codepen.io/shshaw/pen/gEiDt - Add paragraphs to the green box ;]. Granted, it uses Modernizr to accomplish the effect, but all in all it's doable. I saw your answer and the CSS-Tricks.com post as well, but that method doesn't make me happy, it uses extra markup and the CSS is too verbose. I think the best solution is either using flexbox or the transform: translate(-50%, -50%); technique. For IE8 I'd just leave it top/center aligned and move on. Commented Jan 15, 2015 at 17:24
  • 1
    @ricardozea Well the codepen you linked to uses the "display: table" method and extra markup so I'm not surprised. Anyways, +1 to your last sentence. Commented Jan 15, 2015 at 17:50
28

The easiest solution is below:

.outer-div{
  width: 100%;
  height: 200px;
  display: flex;
  border:1px solid #000;
}
.inner-div{
  margin: auto;
  text-align: center;
  border: 1px solid red;
}
<div class="outer-div">
  <div class="inner-div">
    Hey there!
  </div>
</div>

1
  • 2
    Indeed the easiest one yet :) Although, I had to set the styles to a outer-div, instead of body.
    – Neeraj
    Commented Apr 21, 2018 at 12:43
25

There are multiple ways to achieve this.

Using flex property of CSS.

Solution #1

.parent {
    width: 400px;
    height:200px;
    background: blue;
    display: flex;
    align-items: center;
    justify-content:center;
}

.child {
    width: 75px;
    height: 75px;
    background: yellow;
}
<div class="parent">
    <div class="child"></div>
</div>

or by using display: flex; and margin: auto;

Solution #2

.parent {
    width: 400px;
    height:200px;
    background: blue;
    display: flex;
}

.child {
    width: 75px;
    height: 75px;
    background: yellow;
    margin:auto;
}
<div class="parent">
    <div class="child"></div>
</div>

show text center

Solution #3

.parent {
    width: 400px;
    height: 200px;
    background: yellow;
    display: flex;
    align-items: center;
    justify-content:center;
}
<div class="parent">Center</div>

Using percentage(%) height and width.

Solution #4

.parent {
    position: absolute;
    height:100%;
    width:100%;
    background: blue;
    display: flex;
    align-items: center;
    justify-content:center;
}

.child {
    width: 75px;
    height: 75px;
    background: yellow;
}
<div class="parent">
    <div class="child"></div>
</div> 

0
22

Unfortunately — but not surprisingly — the solution is more complicated than one would wish it to be. Also unfortunately, you'll need to use additional divs around the div you want vertically centered.

For standards-compliant browsers like Mozilla, Opera, Safari, etc. you need to set the outer div to be displayed as a table and the inner div to be displayed as a table-cell — which can then be vertically centered. For Internet Explorer, you need to position the inner div absolutely within the outer div and then specify the top as 50%. The following pages explain this technique well and provide some code samples too:

There is also a technique to do the vertical centering using JavaScript. Vertical alignment of content with JavaScript & CSS demonstrates it.

21

If someone cares for Internet Explorer 10 (and later) only, use Flexbox:

.parent {
    width: 500px;
    height: 500px;
    background: yellow;

    display: -webkit-flex;
    display: -ms-flexbox;
    display: flex;

    -webkit-justify-content: center;
    -ms-flex-pack: center;
    justify-content: center;

    -webkit-align-items: center;
    -ms-flex-align: center;
    align-items: center;
}

.centered {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background: blue;
}
<div class="parent">
    <div class="centered"></div>
</div>

Flexbox support: http://caniuse.com/flexbox

3
  • Android < 4.4 doesn't support align-items: center; ! Commented Nov 6, 2014 at 13:42
  • Actually, it does support align-items: center; caniuse.com/#search=align-items
    – t.mikael.d
    Commented Jun 2, 2015 at 12:51
  • @t.mikael.d You might want to take a closer look at that table. For Android < 4.4, it states "Only supports the old flexbox specification and does not support wrapping." Commented Aug 23, 2015 at 1:37
21

A modern way to center an element vertically would be to use flexbox.

You need a parent to decide the height and a child to center.

The example below will center a div to the center within your browser. What's important (in my example) is to set height: 100% to body and html and then min-height: 100% to your container.

body, html {
  background: #F5F5F5;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
}

#center_container {
  align-items: center;
  display: flex;
  min-height: 100%;
}

#center {
  background: white;
  margin: 0 auto;
  padding: 10px;
  text-align: center;
  width: 200px;
}
<div id='center_container'>
  <div id='center'>I am center.</div>
</div>

15

.center {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  left: 50%;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%); /* (x, y)  => position */
  -ms-transform: translate(-50%, -50%); /* IE 9 */
  -webkit-transform: translate(-50%, -50%); /* Chrome, Safari, Opera */    
}

.vertical {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  //left: 0;
  transform: translate(0, -50%); /* (x, y) => position */
}

.horizontal {
  position: absolute;
  //top: 0;
  left: 50%;
  transform: translate(-50%, 0); /* (x, y)  => position */
}

div {
  padding: 1em;
  background-color: grey; 
  color: white;
}  
<body>
  <div class="vertical">Vertically left</div>
  <div class="horizontal">Horizontal top</div>
  <div class="center">Vertically Horizontal</div>  
</body>

Related: Center a Image

15

Centering only vertically

If you don't care about Internet Explorer 6 and 7, you can use a technique that involves two containers.

The outer container:

  • should have display: table;

The inner container:

  • should have display: table-cell;
  • should have vertical-align: middle;

The content box:

  • should have display: inline-block;

You can add any content you want to the content box without caring about its width or height!

Demo:

body {
    margin: 0;
}

.outer-container {
    position: absolute;
    display: table;
    width: 100%; /* This could be ANY width */
    height: 100%; /* This could be ANY height */
    background: #ccc;
}

.inner-container {
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

.centered-content {
    display: inline-block;
    background: #fff;
    padding: 20px;
    border: 1px solid #000;
}
<div class="outer-container">
   <div class="inner-container">
     <div class="centered-content">
        Malcolm in the Middle
     </div>
   </div>
</div>

See also this Fiddle!


Centering horizontally and vertically

If you want to center both horizontally and vertically, you also need the following.

The inner container:

  • should have text-align: center;

The content box:

  • should re-adjust the horizontal text-alignment to for example text-align: left; or text-align: right;, unless you want text to be centered

Demo:

body {
    margin: 0;
}

.outer-container {
    position: absolute;
    display: table;
    width: 100%; /* This could be ANY width */
    height: 100%; /* This could be ANY height */
    background: #ccc;
}

.inner-container {
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
    text-align: center;
}

.centered-content {
    display: inline-block;
    text-align: left;
    background: #fff;
    padding: 20px;
    border: 1px solid #000;
}
<div class="outer-container">
   <div class="inner-container">
     <div class="centered-content">
         Malcolm in the Middle
     </div>
   </div>
</div>

See also this Fiddle!

0
12

It can be done in two ways

body{
left: 50%; 
top:50%; 
transform: translate(-50%, -50%); 
height: 100%; 
width: 100%; 
}

OR

Using flex

body {
    height:100%
    width:100%
    display: flex;
    justify-content: center;
    align-items: center;
}

align-items:center; makes the content vertically center

justify-content: center;makes the content horizontally center

0
10

This is always where I go when I have to come back to this issue.

For those who don't want to make the jump:

  1. Specify the parent container as position:relative or position:absolute.
  2. Specify a fixed height on the child container.
  3. Set position:absolute and top:50% on the child container to move the top down to the middle of the parent.
  4. Set margin-top:-yy where yy is half the height of the child container to offset the item up.

An example of this in code:

<style type="text/css">
    #myoutercontainer {position:relative}
    #myinnercontainer {position:absolute; top:50%; height:10em; margin-top:-5em}
</style>
...
<div id="myoutercontainer">
    <div id="myinnercontainer">
        <p>Hey look! I'm vertically centered!</p>
        <p>How sweet is this?!</p>
    </div>
</div>
1
  • 5em isn't always half the height of the child container.
    – gre_gor
    Commented Nov 25, 2023 at 8:30
9

I just wrote this CSS and to know more, please go through: This article with vertical align anything with just 3 lines of CSS.

.element {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: perspective(1px) translateY(-50%);
}
1
  • 1
    CSS transforms can cause distortions in text and borders (when the math results in fractional pixels).
    – Nathan K
    Commented Dec 5, 2016 at 2:26
8

CSS Grid

body, html { margin: 0; }

body {
  display: grid;
  min-height: 100vh;
  align-items: center;
}
<div>Div to be aligned vertically</div>

8

For newcomers, please try:

display: flex;
align-items: center;
justify-content: center;
3
7

The three lines of code using transform works practically on modern browsers and Internet Explorer:

.element{
     position: relative;
     top: 50%;
     transform: translateY(-50%);
     -moz-transform: translateY(-50%);
     -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
     -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
}

I am adding this answer since I found some incompleteness in the previous version of this answer (and Stack Overflow won't allow me to simply comment).

  1. 'position' relative messes up the styling if the current div is in the body and has no container div. However 'fixed' seems to work, but it obviously fixes the content in the center of the viewport position: relative

  2. Also I used this styling for centering some overlay divs and found that in Mozilla all elements inside this transformed div had lost their bottom borders. Possibly a rendering issue. But adding just the minimal padding to some of them rendered it correctly. Chrome and Internet Explorer (surprisingly) rendered the boxes without any need for padding mozilla without inner paddings mozilla with paddings

7
.center{
    display: grid;
    place-items: center;
}
2
  • adding height: 100%; centers it also vertically. Commented May 27, 2021 at 15:40
  • 1
    Addendum - 'place-content:' does the trick, both directions. :) Can't believe I have to scroll this far and it has so few votes.
    – weo3dev
    Commented Aug 21, 2022 at 12:24
4

The answer from Billbad only works with a fixed width of the .inner div. This solution works for a dynamic width by adding the attribute text-align: center to the .outer div.

.outer {
  position: absolute;
  display: table;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  text-align: center;
}
.middle {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
}
.inner {
  text-align: center;
  display: inline-block;
  width: auto;
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="middle">
    <div class="inner">
      Content
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

1
4

Just do it: Add the class at your div:

.modal {
  margin: auto;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  right: 0;
  left: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  height: 240px;
}

And read this article for an explanation. Note: Height is necessary.

0
3

Not answering for browser compatibility but to also mention the new Grid and the not so new Flexbox feature.

Grid

From: Mozilla - Grid Documentation - Align Div Vertically

Browser Support: Grid Browser Support

CSS:

.wrapper {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: repeat(4, 1fr);
  grid-gap: 10px;
  grid-auto-rows: 200px;
  grid-template-areas: 
    ". a a ."
    ". a a .";
}
.item1 {
  grid-area: a;
  align-self: center;
  justify-self: center;
}

HTML:

<div class="wrapper">
 <div class="item1">Item 1</div>
</div>

Flexbox

Browser Support: Flexbox Browser Support

CSS:

display: -webkit-box;
display: -moz-box;
display: -ms-flexbox;
display: -webkit-flex;
display: flex;
align-items: center;
justify-content: center;
3

I did it with this (change width, height, margin-top and margin-left accordingly):

.wrapper {
    width: 960px;
    height: 590px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    left: 50%;
    margin-top: -295px;
    margin-left: -480px;
}
<div class="wrapper"> -- Content -- </div>
1
  • 1
    Thats only good if you know the width/height of the DIV your trying to center. This isn't what the question is asking
    – egr103
    Commented Feb 19, 2013 at 10:02
3

I think a solid solution for all browsers without using Flexbox - "align-items: center;" is a combination of display: table and vertical-align: middle;.

CSS

.vertically-center
{
    display: table;

    width: 100%;  /* Optional */
    height: 100%; /* Optional */
}

.vertically-center > div
{
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

HTML

<div class="vertically-center">
    <div>
        <div style="border: 1px solid black;">some text</div>
    </div>
</div>

‣Demo: https://jsfiddle.net/6m640rpp/

2

Now we can use the align-content on block layouts without the need of flexbox or CSS grid.

You can test the below using the latest version of chrome.

body {
  margin: 0;
  min-height: 100vh;
  align-content: center; /* vertical centering*/
}

/* the below is for horizontal centering (irrelevant to the question) */
div {
  width: fit-content;
  margin: auto;
}
<div>Div to be aligned vertically</div>

1

Especially for parent divs with relative (unknown) height, the centering in the unknown solution works great for me. There are some really nice code examples in the article.

It was tested in Chrome, Firefox, Opera, and Internet Explorer.

/* This parent can be any width and height */
.block {
  text-align: center;
}

/* The ghost, nudged to maintain perfect centering */
.block:before {
  content: '';
  display: inline-block;
  height: 100%;
  vertical-align: middle;
  margin-right: -0.25em; /* Adjusts for spacing */
}

/* The element to be centered, can
   also be of any width and height */ 
.centered {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
  width: 300px;
}
<div style="width: 400px; height: 200px;">
   <div class="block" style="height: 90%; width: 100%">
  <div class="centered">
	 <h1>Some text</h1>
	 <p>Any other text..."</p>
  </div> 
   </div>
</div>

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