I want to center a div vertically with CSS. I don't want tables or JavaScript, but only pure CSS. I found some solutions, but all of them are missing Internet Explorer 6 support.

<body>
    <div>Div to be aligned vertically</div>
</body>

How can I center a div vertically in all major browsers, including Internet Explorer 6?

  • 4
  • 22
    @MarcoDemaio Don't people constantly frown upon tables for layouts on here? – Chud37 Jan 21 '13 at 15:35
  • 13
    @Chud37: it depends what you have to do, tables for layout are generally not versatile and long to type in code, with css you can easily change a 2 cols layout into a 3/4/5 sols layout etc. But in this case is different, using dozens of css tips-and-tricks for such a simple task that could be accomplished with a perfect cross-browser table, it's like attempting to enter in your house through the window instead of using the door. – Marco Demaio Jan 24 '13 at 19:52
  • 3
    The BEST answer to this question can be found at stackoverflow.com/a/13075912/5651 – jessegavin Aug 14 '13 at 12:58
  • Just see this answer that vertically align a div in other div. Vertically Aligning Divs – Lalit Kumar Dec 27 '13 at 12:41

40 Answers 40

up vote 1184 down vote accepted

Below is the best all-around solution I could build to vertically and horizontally center a fixed-width, flexible height content box. It was tested and working for recent versions of Firefox, Opera, Chrome, and Safari.

.outer {
  display: table;
  position: absolute;
  height: 100%;
  width: 100%;
}

.middle {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
}

.inner {
  margin-left: auto;
  margin-right: auto;
  width: 400px;
  /*whatever width you want*/
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="middle">
    <div class="inner">
      <h1>The Content</h1>
      <p>Once upon a midnight dreary...</p>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

View A Working Example With Dynamic Content

I built in some dynamic content to test the flexibility and would love to know if anyone sees any problems with it. It should work well for centered overlays also -- lightbox, pop-up, etc.

  • 4
    Worked perfectly when the inner div was a flexible height. I tested it in Chrome and IE7 without the outer div positioned absolutely and that worked as well. – Sabrina Leggett Feb 9 '12 at 14:08
  • 43
    This seems to be the only solution that doesn't require any hard-coded heights. – Martijn Jun 21 '12 at 14:37
  • 3
    width: /*whatever width you want*/;, everything but horizontal centering. : s – Bentley4 Feb 9 '14 at 19:59
  • 3
    jsfiddle.net/44oa3Ls6 – Hermann Ingjaldsson Sep 12 '14 at 8:38
  • 4
    Who would have thought almost in 2017 that tables are the best solution for centering an element with an unknown size. And you don't need to worry about the infamous blurred borders bug in Chrome. Thank you! – Saul Fautley Oct 25 '16 at 19:24

One more I can't see on the list:

.Center-Container {
  position: relative;
  height: 100%;
}

.Absolute-Center {
  width: 50%;
  height: 50%;
  overflow: auto;
  margin: auto;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0; left: 0; bottom: 0; right: 0;
  border: solid black;
}
  • Cross-browser (including Internet Explorer 8 - Internet Explorer 10 without hacks!)
  • Responsive with percentages and min-/max-
  • Centered regardless of padding (without box-sizing!)
  • height must be declared (see Variable Height)
  • Recommended setting overflow: auto to prevent content spillover (see Overflow)

Source: Absolute Horizontal And Vertical Centering In CSS

  • 7
    This worked for me, but I needed to have a fixed width and height in chrome for some reason – Ryan Knell May 9 '14 at 0:11
  • Thank you. I needed a fix where I didn't need to calculate px height or width and this worked perfectly. – GFoley83 May 14 '14 at 1:33
  • 7
    Great solution, especially because you don't need a parent div – Luca Steeb Jul 22 '15 at 8:24
  • 1
    This does a stretch if the height is not fixed, other than that: nice solution – Bart Burg Aug 14 '15 at 9:06
  • If you have a width and height that are not 100%, use margin: auto; – Charles L. Nov 7 '15 at 20:29

The simplest way would be the following 3 lines of CSS:

position: relative;
top: 50%;
transform: translateY(-50%);

Following is an example:

div.outer-div {
  height: 170px;
  width: 300px;
  background-color: lightgray;
}

div.middle-div {
  position: relative;
  top: 50%;
  -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
  -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
  transform: translateY(-50%);
}
<div class='outer-div'>
  <div class='middle-div'>
    Test text
  </div>
</div>

  • 1
    note: doesn't work correct if the height of the outer div is set with "min-height: 170px" – Bart Burg Aug 14 '15 at 9:10
  • Interferes with z-index – ripper234 Nov 12 '16 at 19:48
  • 1
    Doesn't work if content has float. – kolobok Dec 9 '16 at 13:35
  • 2
    doesn't work when height of outer div is 100%. Then only works with position: absolute;. – Arch Linux Tux Apr 13 at 8:01
  • I had found this solution elsewhere first, but extra kudos to this particular answer for mentioning the -webkit-transform variant in particular, which I needed to make this method work in phantomjs... ended hours of struggling so thank you! – drmrbrewer Oct 23 at 11:02

Actually you need two div's for vertical centering. The div containing the content must have a width and height.

#container {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  margin-top: -200px;
  /* half of #content height*/
  left: 0;
  width: 100%;
}

#content {
  width: 624px;
  margin-left: auto;
  margin-right: auto;
  height: 395px;
  border: 1px solid #000000;
}
<div id="container">
  <div id="content">
    <h1>Centered div</h1>
  </div>
</div>

Here is the result

  • Thanks!!! Worked for me. Do you mind explain a little how you came up with it? – Dao Lam Aug 29 '13 at 20:56
  • 4
    it's an old trick... top 50% and the top margin negative half the height for the inner div – Manatax Sep 5 '13 at 21:46
  • 31
    it's assuming you have a fixed height for div. don't work when div can change height. – Andre Figueiredo Sep 23 '13 at 12:22
  • 7
    i have compiled a list of all ways that are useful..jsfiddle.net/k6ShD/4 – Muhammad Umer Mar 7 '14 at 9:09

This is the simplest method I found and I use it all the time (jsFiddle demo here)

Thank Chris Coyier from CSS Tricks for this article.

.v-wrap{
    height: 100%;
    white-space: nowrap;
    text-align: center;
}
.v-wrap:before{
    content: "";
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    width: 0;
    /* adjust for white space between pseudo element and next sibling */
    margin-right: -.25em;
    /* stretch line height */
    height: 100%; 
}
.v-box{
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    white-space: normal;
}
<div class="v-wrap">
    <article class="v-box">
        <p>This is how I've been doing it for some time</p>
    </article>
</div>

Support starts with IE8.

After a lot of research I finally found the ultimate solution. It works even for floated elements. View Source

.element {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translateY(-50%); /* or try 50% */
}
  • 2
    This does works really well, provided you remember that the container element must have an implicit or explicit height; jsfiddle.net/14kt53un A minor gotcha to those who are relatively new to CSS. – Martyn Shutt Jul 19 '15 at 11:05
  • 5
    Out of all the answers, this is the most simplest! I hope others see your answer too! Thank you! By the way, 50% worked for me (not -50%) – The Codesee Jan 8 '17 at 14:13
  • this only worked with position:absolute for me. – Panama Jack Jul 23 at 5:54

Now the flexbox solution is a very easy way for modern browsers, so I recommend this for you:

.container{
    display: flex;
    align-items: center;
    justify-content: center;
    height: 100%;
    background:green;
}

body, html{
  height:100%;
}
<div class="container">
    <div>Div to be aligned vertically</div>
</div>

  • worked for me without height:100%; thanks – Sameera R. Apr 12 '17 at 23:27
  • If you've got a navbar, you can tweak the height using height: calc(100% - 55px) or whatever the height of your navbar is. – Adrian Sep 4 '17 at 15:33
  • i also had to remove margins/padding from body – Ben Apr 21 at 22:14

To center the div on a page, check the fiddle link.

#vh {
    margin: auto;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    right: 0;
}
.box{
    border-radius: 15px;
    box-shadow: 0 0 8px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4);
    padding: 25px;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background: white;
}
<div id="vh" class="box">Div to be aligned vertically</div>

Another option is to use flex box, check the fiddle link.

.vh {
    background-color: #ddd;
    height: 400px;
    align-items: center;
    display: flex;
}
.vh > div {
    width: 100%;
    text-align: center;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
<div class="vh">
    <div>Div to be aligned vertically</div>
</div>

Another option is to use a CSS 3 transform:

#vh {
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    left: 50%;
    /*transform: translateX(-50%) translateY(-50%);*/
    transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
}
.box{
    border-radius: 15px;
    box-shadow: 0 0 8px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4);
    padding: 25px;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background: white;
}
<div id="vh" class="box">Div to be aligned vertically</div>

  • 3
    Only works with fixed heights... – Armel Larcier Feb 20 '14 at 20:50
  • 2
    @ArmelLarcier, no, it works with relative height also. – user Mar 9 '14 at 23:15
  • 1
    50% height is fixed. It is not relative to content, but parent. – Armel Larcier Mar 10 '14 at 8:00
  • 2
    @ArmelLarcier That's incorrect. Relative units are percentages %, ems and rems. Absolute or fixed values are pixels or points. What you're referring to is "it only works with a declared height". Howevever, although this method described by Moes does require a height, when you declare it in relative units, percentage is the best, no matter how much content is inside the centered DIV that DIV will expand vertically to fit its content. That's the beauty of this method. The other good thing is that this method works in IE8/9/10 in case someone still needs to support those browsers. – Ricardo Zea Jan 14 '15 at 4:45
  • 1
    @ArmelLarcier It's all good. Is not wrong brother. Try it: codepen.io/shshaw/pen/gEiDt - Add paragraphs to the green box ;]. Granted, it uses Modernizr to accomplish the effect, but all in all it's doable. I saw your answer and the CSS-Tricks.com post as well, but that method doesn't make me happy, it uses extra markup and the CSS is too verbose. I think the best solution is either using flexbox or the transform: translate(-50%, -50%); technique. For IE8 I'd just leave it top/center aligned and move on. – Ricardo Zea Jan 15 '15 at 17:24

Flexbox solution

Notes
1. The parent element is given the class name.
2. Add flex vendor prefixes if required by your supported browsers.

.verticallyCenter {
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
}
<div class="verticallyCenter" style="height:200px; background:beige">
    <div>Element centered vertically</div>
</div>

  • Note justify-content: center will center items horizontally as well – Peter Berg Apr 6 '17 at 20:04

Unfortunately — but not surprisingly — the solution is more complicated than one would wish it to be. Also unfortunately, you'll need to use additional divs around the div you want vertically centered.

For standards-compliant browsers like Mozilla, Opera, Safari, etc. you need to set the outer div to be displayed as a table and the inner div to be displayed as a table-cell — which can then be vertically centered. For Internet Explorer, you need to position the inner div absolutely within the outer div and then specify the top as 50%. The following pages explain this technique well and provide some code samples too:

There is also a technique to do the vertical centering using JavaScript. Vertical alignment of content with JavaScript & CSS demonstrates it.

If someone cares for Internet Explorer 10 (and later) only, use flexbox:

.parent {
    width: 500px;
    height: 500px;
    background: yellow;

    display: -webkit-flex;
    display: -ms-flexbox;
    display: flex;

    -webkit-justify-content: center;
    -ms-flex-pack: center;
    justify-content: center;

    -webkit-align-items: center;
    -ms-flex-align: center;
    align-items: center;
}

.centered {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background: blue;
}
<div class="parent">
    <div class="centered"></div>
</div>

Flexbox support: http://caniuse.com/flexbox

  • Android < 4.4 doesn't support align-items: center; ! – André Fiedler Nov 6 '14 at 13:42
  • Actually, it does support align-items: center; caniuse.com/#search=align-items – t.mikael.d Jun 2 '15 at 12:51
  • @t.mikael.d You might want to take a closer look at that table. For Android < 4.4, it states "Only supports the old flexbox specification and does not support wrapping." – Nathan Osman Aug 23 '15 at 1:37
  • 3
    IE9 does not support flexbox. Maybe you meant "if someone cares about IE10+ only"? – Chris Bier Mar 31 '16 at 17:03
  • @ChrisBier Sure. Fixed. Thx. – bravedick Apr 1 '16 at 10:43

A modern way to center an element vertically would be to use flexbox.

You need a parent to decide the height and a child to center.

The example below will center a div to the center within your browser. What's important (in my example) is to set height: 100% to body and html and then min-height: 100% to your container.

body, html {
  background: #F5F5F5;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
}

#center_container {
  align-items: center;
  display: flex;
  min-height: 100%;
}

#center {
  background: white;
  margin: 0 auto;
  padding: 10px;
  text-align: center;
  width: 200px;
}
<div id='center_container'>
  <div id='center'>I am center.</div>
</div>

.center {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  left: 50%;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%); /* (x, y)  => position */
  -ms-transform: translate(-50%, -50%); /* IE 9 */
  -webkit-transform: translate(-50%, -50%); /* Chrome, Safari, Opera */    
}

.vertical {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  //left: 0;
  transform: translate(0, -50%); /* (x, y) => position */
}

.horizontal {
  position: absolute;
  //top: 0;
  left: 50%;
  transform: translate(-50%, 0); /* (x, y)  => position */
}

div {
  padding: 1em;
  background-color: grey; 
  color: white;
}  
<body>
  <div class="vertical">Vertically left</div>
  <div class="horizontal">Horizontal top</div>
  <div class="center">Vertically Horizontal</div>  
</body>

Related: Center a Image

Centering only vertically

If you don't care about Internet Explorer 6 and 7, you can use a technique that involves two containers.

The outer container:

  • should have display: table;

The inner container:

  • should have display: table-cell;
  • should have vertical-align: middle;

The content box:

  • should have display: inline-block;

You can add any content you want to the content box without caring about its width or height!

Demo:

body {
    margin: 0;
}

.outer-container {
    position: absolute;
    display: table;
    width: 100%; /* This could be ANY width */
    height: 100%; /* This could be ANY height */
    background: #ccc;
}

.inner-container {
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

.centered-content {
    display: inline-block;
    background: #fff;
    padding: 20px;
    border: 1px solid #000;
}
<div class="outer-container">
   <div class="inner-container">
     <div class="centered-content">
        Malcolm in the Middle
     </div>
   </div>
</div>

See also this Fiddle!


Centering horizontally and vertically

If you want to center both horizontally and vertically, you also need the following.

The inner container:

  • should have text-align: center;

The content box:

  • should re-adjust the horizontal text-alignment to for example text-align: left; or text-align: right;, unless you want text to be centered

Demo:

body {
    margin: 0;
}

.outer-container {
    position: absolute;
    display: table;
    width: 100%; /* This could be ANY width */
    height: 100%; /* This could be ANY height */
    background: #ccc;
}

.inner-container {
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
    text-align: center;
}

.centered-content {
    display: inline-block;
    text-align: left;
    background: #fff;
    padding: 20px;
    border: 1px solid #000;
}
<div class="outer-container">
   <div class="inner-container">
     <div class="centered-content">
         Malcolm in the Middle
     </div>
   </div>
</div>

See also this Fiddle!

  • 2
    This answer is similar to this one: stackoverflow.com/a/24570521/363573. – Stephan Jan 21 '16 at 13:49
  • You forgot to horizontally center the content. Add text-align:center; to the .inner-container. – Doug S Apr 18 '16 at 10:50
  • @DougS : I didn't forget to horizontally center the content. I did not add horizontal centering because the question only mentions vertical centering. – John Slegers Apr 18 '16 at 15:47
  • @DougS : I just added some info on how to also center horizontally! – John Slegers Apr 18 '16 at 16:17

The easiest solution is below:

.outer-div{
  width: 100%;
  height: 200px;
  display: flex;
}
.inner-div{
  margin: auto;
  text-align:center;
}
<div class="outer-div">
  <div class="inner-div">
    Hey there!
  </div>
</div>

  • 2
    Indeed the easiest one yet :) Although, I had to set the styles to a outer-div, instead of body. – baburao Apr 21 at 12:43
  • p.s. updated my answer – Varsha Dhadge May 15 at 6:32

This is always where I go when I have to come back to this issue.

For those who don't want to make the jump:

  1. Specify the parent container as position:relative or position:absolute.
  2. Specify a fixed height on the child container.
  3. Set position:absolute and top:50% on the child container to move the top down to the middle of the parent.
  4. Set margin-top:-yy where yy is half the height of the child container to offset the item up.

An example of this in code:

<style type="text/css">
    #myoutercontainer {position:relative}
    #myinnercontainer {position:absolute; top:50%; height:10em; margin-top:-5em}
</style>
...
<div id="myoutercontainer">
    <div id="myinnercontainer">
        <p>Hey look! I'm vertically centered!</p>
        <p>How sweet is this?!</p>
    </div>
</div>

I just wrote this CSS and to know more, please go through: This article with vertical align anything with just 3 lines of CSS.

.element {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: perspective(1px) translateY(-50%);
}
  • 1
    CSS transforms can cause distortions in text and borders (when the math results in fractional pixels). – Nathan K Dec 5 '16 at 2:26

The following link presents a simple way of doing it with just 3 lines in your CSS:

Vertical align anything with just 3 lines of CSS.

Credits to: Sebastian Ekström.

I know the question has already an answer however I saw utility in the link for its simplicity.

The answer from Billbad only works with a fixed width of the .inner div. This solution works for a dynamic width by adding the attribute text-align: center to the .outer div.

.outer {
  position: absolute;
  display: table;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  text-align: center;
}
.middle {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
}
.inner {
  text-align: center;
  display: inline-block;
  width: auto;
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="middle">
    <div class="inner">
      Content
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

The three lines of code using transform works practically on modern browsers and Internet Explorer:

.element{
     position: relative;
     top: 50%;
     transform: translateY(-50%);
     -moz-transform: translateY(-50%);
     -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
     -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
}

I am adding this answer since I found some incompleteness in the previous version of this answer (and Stack Overflow won't allow me to simply comment).

  1. 'position' relative messes up the styling if the current div is in the body and has no container div. However 'fixed' seems to work, but it obviously fixes the content in the center of the viewport position: relative

  2. Also I used this styling for centering some overlay divs and found that in Mozilla all elements inside this transformed div had lost their bottom borders. Possibly a rendering issue. But adding just the minimal padding to some of them rendered it correctly. Chrome and Internet Explorer (surprisingly) rendered the boxes without any need for padding mozilla without inner paddings mozilla with paddings

I did it with this (change width, height, margin-top and margin-left accordingly):

.wrapper {
    width:960px;
    height:590px;
    position:absolute;
    top:50%;
    left:50%;
    margin-top:-295px;
    margin-left:-480px;
}

<div class="wrapper"> -- Content -- </div>
  • Thats only good if you know the width/height of the DIV your trying to center. This isn't what the question is asking – egr103 Feb 19 '13 at 10:02

Not answering for browser compatibility but to also mention the new Grid and the not so new Flexbox feature.

Grid

From: Mozilla - Grid Documentation - Align Div Vertically

Browser Support: Grid Browser Support

CSS:

.wrapper {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: repeat(4, 1fr);
  grid-gap: 10px;
  grid-auto-rows: 200px;
  grid-template-areas: 
    ". a a ."
    ". a a .";
}
.item1 {
  grid-area: a;
  align-self: center;
  justify-self: center;
}

HTML:

<div class="wrapper">
 <div class="item1">Item 1</div>
</div>

Flexbox

Browser Support: Flexbox Browser Support

CSS:

display: -webkit-box;
display: -moz-box;
display: -ms-flexbox;
display: -webkit-flex;
display: flex;
align-items: center;
justify-content: center;

Especially for parent divs with relative (unknown) height, the centering in the unknown solution works great for me. There are some really nice code examples in the article.

It was tested in Chrome, Firefox, Opera, and Internet Explorer.

/* This parent can be any width and height */
.block {
  text-align: center;
}

/* The ghost, nudged to maintain perfect centering */
.block:before {
  content: '';
  display: inline-block;
  height: 100%;
  vertical-align: middle;
  margin-right: -0.25em; /* Adjusts for spacing */
}

/* The element to be centered, can
   also be of any width and height */ 
.centered {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
  width: 300px;
}
<div style="width: 400px; height: 200px;">
   <div class="block" style="height: 90%; width: 100%">
  <div class="centered">
	 <h1>Some text</h1>
	 <p>Any other text..."</p>
  </div> 
   </div>
</div>

I think a solid solution for all browsers without using flexbox - "align-items: center;" is a combination of display: table and vertical-align: middle;.

CSS

.vertically-center
{
    display: table;

    width: 100%;  /* optional */
    height: 100%; /* optional */
}

.vertically-center > div
{
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

HTML

<div class="vertically-center">
    <div>
        <div style="border: 1px solid black;">some text</div>
    </div>
</div>

‣demo: https://jsfiddle.net/6m640rpp/

I find this one most useful.. it gives the most accurate 'H' layout and is very simple to understand.

The benefit in this markup is that you define your content size in a single place -> "PageContent".
The Colors of the page background and its horizontal margins are defined in their corresponding divs.

<div id="PageLayoutConfiguration" 
     style="display: table;
     position:absolute; top: 0px; right: 0px; bottom: 0px; left: 0px;
     width: 100%; height: 100%;">

        <div id="PageBackground" 
             style="display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle;
             background-color: purple;">

            <div id="PageHorizontalMargins"
                 style="width: 100%;
                 background-color: seashell;">

                <div id="PageContent" 
                     style="width: 1200px; height: 620px; margin: 0 auto;
                     background-color: grey;">

                     my content goes here...

                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

And here with CSS separated:

<div id="PageLayoutConfiguration">
     <div id="PageBackground">
          <div id="PageHorizontalMargins">
               <div id="PageContent">
                     my content goes here...
               </div>
          </div>
     </div>
</div>

#PageLayoutConfiguration{
   display: table; width: 100%; height: 100%;
   position:absolute; top: 0px; right: 0px; bottom: 0px; left: 0px;
}

#PageBackground{
   display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle;
   background-color: purple;
}

#PageHorizontalMargins{
   style="width: 100%;
   background-color: seashell;
}
#PageContent{
   width: 1200px; height: 620px; margin: 0 auto;
   background-color: grey;
}

The contents can be easily centered by using flexbox. The following code shows the CSS for the container inside which the contents needs to be centered:

.absolute-center {
    display: -ms-flexbox;
    display: -webkit-flex;
    display: flex;

    -ms-flex-align: center;
    -webkit-align-items: center;
    -webkit-box-align: center;

    align-items: center;
}

This solution worked for me if you have a block element (e. g. ). I used the colors to make the solution clearer.

HTML:

<main class="skin_orange">
<p>As you can the the element/box is vertically centered</p>
<div class="bigBox skin_blue">Blue Box</div>
</main>

CSS:

main {
    position: relative;
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
}

.skin_orange {
    outline: thin dotted red;
    background: orange;
}

.bigBox {
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translateY(-50%);
}

.skin_blue {
    background-color: blue;
}

JSFiddle Code Demo

I use this. It works in Internet Explorer 8 and later:

height:268px - for display:table acts like min-height.

CSS:

* {
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
}
body {
  background: #cc9999;
}
p {
  background: #f0ad4e;
}
#all {
  margin: 200px auto;
}
.ff-valign-wrap {
  display: table;
  width: 100%;
  height: 268px;
  background: #ff00ff;
}
.ff-valign {
  display: table-cell;
  height: 100%;
  vertical-align: middle;
  text-align: center;
  background: #ffff00;
}

HTML:

<body>

  <div id="all">
    <div class="ff-valign-wrap">
      <div class="ff-valign">
        <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
        <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
        <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
        <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
        <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
        <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
        <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>

</body>

Just do it: Add the class at your div:

.modal {
  margin: auto;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  right: 0;
  left: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  height: 240px;
}

And read this article for an explanation. Note: Height is necessary.

The following is working in my case and was tested in Firefox.

#element {
    display: block;
    transform: translateY(50%);
    -moz-transform: translateY(50%);
    -webkit-transform: translateY(50%);
    -ms-transform: translateY(50%);
}

The div's height and parent's height are dynamic. I use it when there are other elements on the same parent which is higher than the target element, where both are positioned horizontally inline.

protected by Josh Crozier Mar 16 '14 at 1:10

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.