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I've created a simple encryption program in D, and I had the idea to make a DLL from it and try to import it to, for example, Python.

I've could simply call my main function, becouse it dosn't need any params. But when I get to my encrytion method, it uses dynamic-lenght ubyte[] arrays, but as far as I know, they don't exist in other C/C++ based langs.

For example, there's the first line of one of my funcs:
ubyte[] encode(ubyte[] data, ubyte[] key){

But I can't use an array without fixed lenght in other languages! How can I import that function, for example, in Python?

EDIT:

I know that I can create a wrapper that takes a pointer and the lenght of the array, but isn't there a more elegant solution?
(Where I don't need to use D to use a lib written in D)

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    I'm not sure exactly how you'd do it in Python, but a C wrapper would be done by making a little function that takes a data pointer and a length, then forwards that to the slice. So if you can figure out how to do a Python array to a C array, then you do C to D and you're set. Sep 21, 2016 at 16:32
  • @AdamD.Ruppe Yeah, that was my first idea. Looks like good, but I think there's a more elegant soulution.
    – Uncle Dino
    Sep 21, 2016 at 16:50
  • Maybe this is of help: wiki.dlang.org/Win32_DLLs_in_D Sep 21, 2016 at 17:12
  • dlang.org/spec/interfaceToC.html Seems there is no matching type in C for any type[]... Sep 21, 2016 at 17:18
  • Maybe you can do that already with pyd ( github.com/ariovistus/pyd ) ??
    – DejanLekic
    Sep 22, 2016 at 9:17

1 Answer 1

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Well tbh. there's no real elegant way other than wrapping a pointer with a length or wrapping to C arrays and then to D.

However you can make a somewhat elegant purpose with the first way using a struct that has a pointer, a length and a property that converts it to a D array.

Then the function you export takes your struct, all that function should do is call an internal function that takes an actual D array and you'd simply pass the array to it and the conversion would happen at that moment through alias this and the conversion property.

An example usage is here: module main;

import core.stdc.stdlib : malloc;

import std.stdio;

struct DArray(T) {
    T* data;
    size_t length;
    /// This field can be removed, only used for testing purpose
    size_t offset;

    @property T[] array() {
        T[] arr;

        foreach(i; 0 .. length) {
            arr ~= data[i];
        }

        return arr;
    }

    alias array this;

    /// This function can be removed, only used for testing purpose
    void init(size_t size) {
        data = cast(T*)malloc(size * T.sizeof);
        length = size;
    }

    /// This function can be removed, only used for testing purpose
    void append(T value) {
        data[offset] = value;

        offset++;
    }
}

// This function is the one exported
void externalFoo(DArray!int intArray) {
    writeln("Calling extern foo");

    internalFoo(intArray);
}

// This function is the one you use
private void internalFoo(int[] intArray) {
    writeln("Calling internal foo");

    writeln(intArray);
}


void main() {
    // Constructing our test array
    DArray!int arrayTest;
    arrayTest.init(10);

    foreach (int i; 0 .. 10) {
        arrayTest.append(i);
    }

    // Testing the exported function 
    externalFoo(arrayTest);
}

Here is an absolute minimum version of how to do it

struct DArray(T) {
    T* data;
    size_t length;

    @property T[] array() {
        T[] arr;

        foreach(i; 0 .. length) {
            arr ~= data[i];
        }

        return arr;
    }

    alias array this;

}

// This function is the one exported
void externalFoo(DArray!int intArray) {
    writeln("Calling extern foo");

    internalFoo(intArray);
}

// This function is the one you use
private void internalFoo(int[] intArray) {
    writeln("Calling internal foo");

    writeln(intArray);
}
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  • Looks like good, but eh, it's simpler to use C-wrappers for pointers and lengths.
    – Uncle Dino
    Sep 22, 2016 at 19:14

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