I have a data file that I need to read in C. It is compirsed of alternating 16-bit integer stored in binary form, and I need only the first column (ie, every other entry starting at 0)

I have a simple python script that reads the files accurately:

import numpy as np


fname = '[filename]'
columntypes = np.dtype([('curr_pA', '>i2'),('volts', '>i2')])
test = np.memmap(fname, dtype=columntypes,mode='r')['curr_pA']

I want to port this to C. Because my machine is natively little-endian I need to manually perform the byte swap. Here's what I have done:

void swapByteOrder_int16(double *current, int16_t *rawsignal, int64_t length)
{
    int64_t i;
    for (i=0; i<length; i++)
    {
        current[i] = ((rawsignal[2*i] << 8) | ((rawsignal[2*i] >> 8) & 0xFF));
    }
}


int64_t read_current_int16(FILE *input, double *current, int16_t *rawsignal, int64_t position, int64_t length)
{
    int64_t test;

    int64_t read = 0;

    if (fseeko64(input,(off64_t) position*2*sizeof(int16_t),SEEK_SET))
    {
        return 0;
    }
    test = fread(rawsignal, sizeof(int16_t), 2*length, input);
    read = test/2;
    if (test != 2*length)
    {
        perror("End of file reached");
    }
    swapByteOrder_int16(current, rawsignal, length);
    return read;
}

In the read_current_int16 function I use fread to read a large chunk of data (both columns) into rawsignal array. I then call swapByteOrder_int16 to pick off every other value, and swap its bytes around. I then cast the result to double and store it in current.

It doesn't work. I get garbage as the output in the C code. I think I've been starting at it for too long and can no longer see my own errors. Can anyone spot anything glaringly wrong?

  • 2
    Why does code use double in swapByteOrder_int16(double *current, int16_t *rawsignal, int64_t length) instead of int16_t? – chux Sep 21 '16 at 16:55
  • The rest of the code uses double to process the output of the I/O section of the code. Since I'm casting from int16_t to double there should be no loss of precision. There is an implicit cast in the assignment to current[i]. – KBriggs Sep 21 '16 at 16:58
  • rawsignal[2*i] means that the input is 32 bits per int. Now, if those are also swapped, you should use rawsignal[2*(i+1)-1] Use a debugger to check what is happening. – Paul Ogilvie Sep 21 '16 at 16:59
  • 1
    rawsignal should be unsigned. Otherwise the >> 8 may move in 1-bits (sign extension). – Paul Ogilvie Sep 21 '16 at 17:02
  • You may not need to port this to C. See Byte-swapping Introduction to byte ordering and ndarrays from the numpy docs. – Steven Rumbalski Sep 21 '16 at 17:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Perform the endian swap as unsigned math and then assign to double.

void swapByteOrder_int16(double *current, const int16_t *rawsignal, size_t length) {
    for (size_t i = 0; i < length; i++) {
      int16_t x = rawsignal[2*i];
      x = (x*1u << 8) | (x*1u >> 8);
      current[i] = x;
    }
}
  • This does the trick. I figured it out slightly differently, but I think our approaches are equivalent. – KBriggs Sep 21 '16 at 17:17
  • See my posted answer for the way I implemented it, but this post gave me the answer so I accepted it. – KBriggs Sep 21 '16 at 17:26

I prefer this mask and shift combination:

current[i] = ((rawsignal[2*i] & 0x00ff) << 8) | (rawsignal[2*i] >> 8)

As suggested by several people, doing the shifts as unsigned does the trick. I am answering this with my implementation just for the sake of completeness since I tweaked it a little from the accepted answer:

void swapByteOrder_int16(double *current, uint16_t *rawsignal, int64_t length)
{
    union int16bits bitval;

    int64_t i;
    for (i=0; i<length; i++)
    {
        bitval.bits = rawsignal[2*i];
        bitval.bits = (bitval.bits << 8) | (bitval.bits >> 8);
        current[i] = (double) bitval.currentval;
    }
}

union int16bits
{
    uint16_t bits;
    int16_t currentval;
};

Swapping bits with unsigned types will make things much easier:

void swapByteOrder_int16(double *current, void const *rawsignal_, size_t length)
{
    uint16_t const *rawsignal = rawsignal_;
    size_t i;
    for (i=0; i<length; i++)
    {
       uint16_t tmp = rawsignal[2*i];
       tmp = ((tmp >> 8) & 0xffu) | ((tmp << 8) & 0xff00u);
       current[i] = (int16_t)(tmp);
    }
}

NOTE: when rawsignal is not aligned, you have to memcpy() it.

  • I believe this is equivalent to the answer I accepted, but you were slightly slower ^_^. For interest, I posted my solution as implemented as another answer. – KBriggs Sep 21 '16 at 17:24
  • 1
    The first & 0xffu is not needed. The second & 0xffu is wrong, perhaps 0xFF00 (and also not needed). – chux Sep 21 '16 at 17:25
  • Please fix the masking since it is not correct - this code won't work. – Lundin Sep 21 '16 at 17:58
  • chux: yes, the first & is not needed. But it makes things more symmetrically (e.g. when converting an uint32_t). It increases readability too and almost every compiler will optimize it away. – ensc Sep 21 '16 at 18:20

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