26

I have to do checks between a development and release database and do this manually, which is both slow and not 100% reliable (I only visually inspect the tables).

Is there a quick and easy way to compare table schemas automatically? Maybe even a feature that does this built right into SQL server?

Edit: I'm comparing structure only, thank you for pointing this out.

  • 1
    Note: the OP is talking about structure, not data. – RedFilter Oct 18 '10 at 18:56
  • 1
    @RedFilter: Edited the question to clarify that, that was indeed confusing – Daniel DiPaolo Oct 18 '10 at 18:57
  • Of course it would help if you scripted changes and put them in source control to be moved with the rest of the code for that version of the software. Then you wouldn;t need to be doing all this diffing (and maybe accidentally moving something not yet ready for prod.) – HLGEM Oct 18 '10 at 19:13
  • @HLGEM Scripting changes locks you out of any strategy that involves a visual schema design tool, unless that tool generates said scripts for you. Inevitably most good schema design tools are good at only that one thing. – Chris Moschini Jan 27 '11 at 18:27
  • @ Chris Moschini, I can script a table far faster than I can use one of those things, so I don't ever use them. – HLGEM Jan 27 '11 at 19:07

10 Answers 10

22

I'm a fan of SQL DBDiff, which is an open source tool you can use to compare tables, views, functions, users, etc. of two instances of SQL Server databases and generate a change script between the source and destination databases.

  • The diff tool is a little subpar, I had clear differences in the structures between source and destination and it didn't highlight them at all. In saying that, it found some, just not all.. – Eric Nov 18 '15 at 1:11
10

There are some commercial products that do this; Visual Studio 2010 Premium Edition can compare schemas.

Some others:
http://www.red-gate.com/products/SQL_Compare/index.htm
http://www.apexsql.com/sql_tools_diff.aspx

  • Yes! Using Visual Studio 2015 Professional: menu Tools / SQL Server / New Schema Comparison... – Matt Roy Nov 20 '18 at 16:54
7

Data or structure or both? Try RedGate sql compare or data compare. They both have free trials and are awesome.

http://www.red-gate.com/products/SQL_Compare/index.htm

http://www.red-gate.com/products/SQL_Data_Compare/index.htm

  • Just the structure. Is there a free version of that $400 beast? – sooprise Oct 18 '10 at 18:53
  • There isn't a free version of anything that is better than red_gate's tools. This is something you should spend the money on. – HLGEM Oct 18 '10 at 19:11
  • I just downloaded DB Diff and it gets the job done for the simple tasks I do. I will keep Red Gate in mind in the future though. – sooprise Oct 18 '10 at 19:16
7

I'm a little late to the game...but this script I made has worked well for me. It'll work across linked servers too if needed.

use master
go

DECLARE @Server1 VARCHAR(100) ='[CARNYSQLTEST1].'; --include a dot at the end
DECLARE @DB1 VARCHAR(100) = '[ZipCrim]';
DECLARE @Table1 VARCHAR(100) = 'IntAction';

DECLARE @Server2 VARCHAR(100) ='[CARNYSQLDEV].'; --include a dot at the end
DECLARE @DB2 VARCHAR(100) = '[ZipCrim]';
DECLARE @Table2 VARCHAR(100) = 'IntAction';

DECLARE @SQL NVARCHAR(MAX);


SET @SQL = 
'
SELECT Table1.ServerName,
       Table1.DBName,
       Table1.SchemaName,
       Table1.TableName,
       Table1.ColumnName,
       Table1.name DataType,
       Table1.Length,
       Table1.Precision,
       Table1.Scale,
       Table1.Is_Identity,
       Table1.Is_Nullable,
       Table2.ServerName,
       Table2.DBName,
       Table2.SchemaName,
       Table2.TableName,
       Table2.ColumnName,
       Table2.name DataType,
       Table2.Length,
       Table2.Precision,
       Table2.Scale,
       Table2.Is_Identity,
       Table2.Is_Nullable
FROM   
    (SELECT ''' + @Server1 + ''' ServerName, 
           ''' + @DB1 + ''' DbName,
           SCHEMA_NAME(t.schema_id) SchemaName,
           t.Name TableName,
           c.Name ColumnName,
           st.Name,
           c.Max_Length Length,
           c.Precision,
           c.Scale,
           c.Is_Identity,
           c.Is_Nullable
    FROM   ' + @Server1 + @DB1 + '.sys.tables t
           INNER JOIN ' + @Server1 + @DB1 + '.sys.columns c ON t.Object_ID = c.Object_ID
           INNER JOIN sys.types st ON St.system_type_id = c.System_Type_id AND st.user_type_id = c.user_type_id
    WHERE  t.Name = ''' + @Table1 + ''') Table1 
    FULL OUTER JOIN
    (SELECT ''' + @Server2 + ''' ServerName, 
           ''' + @DB2 + ''' DbName,
           SCHEMA_NAME(t.schema_id) SchemaName,
           t.name TableName,
           c.name ColumnName,
           st.Name,
           c.max_length Length,
           c.Precision,
           c.Scale,
           c.Is_Identity,
           c.Is_Nullable
    FROM   ' + @Server2 + @DB2 + '.sys.tables t
           INNER JOIN ' + @Server2 + @DB2 + '.sys.columns c ON t.Object_ID = c.Object_ID
           INNER JOIN sys.types st ON St.system_type_id = c.System_Type_id AND st.user_type_id = c.user_type_id
    WHERE  t.Name = ''' + @Table2 + ''') Table2
    ON Table1.ColumnName = Table2.ColumnName
ORDER BY CASE WHEN Table1.ColumnName IS NULL THEN 2 ELSE 1 END, Table1.ColumnName
'

EXEC sp_executesql @SQL
  • Would I be able to use this script to compare two separate databases to compare tables differences in columns and so forth? – Vaishal Patel Jul 15 '18 at 14:38
4

Soo,

Googled this:

for structures:

see also:

My previous answers' links doesn't work anymore for some reason, so here's another answer from TechNet:

DECLARE @Sourcedb sysname 
DECLARE @Destdb sysname 
DECLARE @Tablename sysname 
DECLARE @SQL varchar(max) 

SELECT @Sourcedb = '<<SourceDatabaseName>>' 
SELECT @Destdb   = '<<DestinationDatabaseName>>' 
SELECT @Tablename = '<<Tablename>>' --  '%' for all tables 

SELECT @SQL = ' SELECT Tablename  = ISNULL(Source.tablename,Destination.tablename) 
                      ,ColumnName = ISNULL(Source.Columnname,Destination.Columnname) 
                      ,Source.Datatype 
                      ,Source.Length 
                      ,Source.precision 
                      ,Destination.Datatype 
                      ,Destination.Length 
                      ,Destination.precision 
                      ,[Column]  = 
                       Case  
                       When Source.Columnname IS NULL then ''Column Missing in the Source'' 
                       When Destination.Columnname IS NULL then ''Column Missing in the Destination'' 
                       ELSE '''' 
                       end 
                      ,DataType = CASE WHEN Source.Columnname IS NOT NULL  
                                        AND Destination.Columnname IS NOT NULL  
                                        AND Source.Datatype <> Destination.Datatype THEN ''Data Type mismatch''  
                                  END 
                      ,Length   = CASE WHEN Source.Columnname IS NOT NULL  
                                        AND Destination.Columnname IS NOT NULL  
                                        AND Source.Length <> Destination.Length THEN ''Length mismatch''  
                                  END 
                      ,Precision = CASE WHEN Source.Columnname IS NOT NULL  
                                        AND Destination.Columnname IS NOT NULL 
                                        AND Source.precision <> Destination.precision THEN ''precision mismatch'' 
                                    END 
                      ,Collation = CASE WHEN Source.Columnname IS NOT NULL  
                                        AND Destination.Columnname IS NOT NULL 
                                        AND ISNULL(Source.collation_name,'''') <> ISNULL(Destination.collation_name,'''') THEN ''Collation mismatch'' 
                                        END 

   FROM  
 ( 
 SELECT Tablename  = so.name  
      , Columnname = sc.name 
      , DataType   = St.name 
      , Length     = Sc.max_length 
      , precision  = Sc.precision 
      , collation_name = Sc.collation_name 
  FROM ' + @Sourcedb + '.SYS.objects So 
  JOIN ' + @Sourcedb + '.SYS.columns Sc 
    ON So.object_id = Sc.object_id 
  JOIN ' + @Sourcedb + '.SYS.types St 
    ON Sc.system_type_id = St.system_type_id 
   AND Sc.user_type_id   = St.user_type_id 
 WHERE SO.TYPE =''U'' 
   AND SO.Name like ''' + @Tablename + ''' 
  ) Source 
 FULL OUTER JOIN 
 ( 
  SELECT Tablename  = so.name  
      , Columnname = sc.name 
      , DataType   = St.name 
      , Length     = Sc.max_length 
      , precision  = Sc.precision 
      , collation_name = Sc.collation_name 
  FROM ' + @Destdb + '.SYS.objects So 
  JOIN ' + @Destdb + '.SYS.columns Sc 
    ON So.object_id = Sc.object_id 
  JOIN ' + @Destdb + '.SYS.types St 
    ON Sc.system_type_id = St.system_type_id 
   AND Sc.user_type_id   = St.user_type_id 
WHERE SO.TYPE =''U'' 
  AND SO.Name like ''' + @Tablename + ''' 
 ) Destination  
 ON source.tablename = Destination.Tablename  
 AND source.Columnname = Destination.Columnname ' 

EXEC (@Sql)
2

For a free solution, you can use SQL Server Managements Objects to output the DDL script for each table, view, index, SP, UDF, etc. Then you can compare, either in code, or using a diff tool like WinMerge.

1

you can take a look at http://cdttools.com/2011/10/sql-diff-erence/ its a low cost alternative, will walk schema between two databases and tell you whats changed. You can then use SQL Mgmt studio to generate "script->As Alter" to build change scripts. (caveat: I wrote it)

1

Modified a bit of BD.'s query, all credit goes to him. (Changed SCHEMA_NAME(schema_id) to sys.schemas join because SCHEMA_NAME(schema_id) works with current db context which is master, changed sorting and changed column names and added the status column)

USE master
GO

DECLARE
    @Server1 VARCHAR(100) = 'Server1.', -- don't forget to include a dot at the end
    @Server2 VARCHAR(100) = 'Server2.', -- don't forget to include a dot at the end
    @DB1 VARCHAR(100) = 'Database1',
    @DB2 VARCHAR(100) = 'Database2'

DECLARE @SQL NVARCHAR(MAX);

SET @SQL = '
SELECT
    CASE
        WHEN s1.[Column] IS NOT NULL
            AND s2.[Column] IS NULL
            THEN ''New''
        WHEN s1.[Column] IS NULL
            AND s2.[Column] IS NOT NULL
            THEN ''Deleted''
        WHEN s1.[Column] IS NOT NULL
            AND s2.[Column] IS NOT NULL
            AND (s1.[Type] <> s2.[Type]
                OR s1.[Length] <> s2.[Length]
                OR s1.[Precision] <> s2.[Precision]
                OR s1.Scale <> s2.Scale
                OR s1.IsNullable <> s2.IsNullable
                OR s1.IsIdentity <> s2.IsIdentity
                OR s1.IdentitySeed <> s2.IdentitySeed
                OR s1.IdentityIncrement <> s2.IdentityIncrement
                OR s1.DefaultValue <> s2.DefaultValue)
            THEN ''Changed''
        ELSE ''Identical''
    END [Status],
    s1.[Database],
    s1.[Schema],
    s1.[Table],
    s1.[Column],
    s1.[Type],
    s1.IsCharType,
    s1.[Length],
    s1.[Precision],
    s1.Scale,
    s1.IsNullable,
    s1.IsIdentity,
    s1.IdentitySeed,
    s1.IdentityIncrement,
    s1.DefaultValue,
    s1.[Order],
    s2.[Database],
    s2.[Schema],
    s2.[Table],
    s2.[Column],
    s2.[Type],
    s2.IsCharType,
    s2.[Length],
    s2.[Precision],
    s2.Scale,
    s2.IsNullable,
    s2.IsIdentity,
    s2.IdentitySeed,
    s2.IdentityIncrement,
    s2.DefaultValue,
    s2.[Order]
FROM (
    SELECT
        ''' + @DB1 + ''' AS [Database],
        s.name AS [Schema],
        t.name AS [Table],
        c.name AS [Column],
        tp.name AS [Type],
        CASE 
            WHEN tp.collation_name IS NOT NULL
                THEN 1
            ELSE 0
        END AS IsCharType,
        CASE
            WHEN c.max_length = -1
                THEN ''MAX''
            ELSE CAST(c.max_length AS VARCHAR(4))
        END AS [Length],
        c.[precision],
        c.scale,
        c.is_nullable AS IsNullable,
        c.is_identity AS IsIdentity,
        CAST(ISNULL(ic.seed_value, 0) AS INT) AS IdentitySeed,
        CAST(ISNULL(ic.increment_value, 0) AS INT) AS IdentityIncrement,
        dc.definition AS DefaultValue,
        c.column_id AS [Order]
    FROM ' + @Server1 + @DB1 + '.sys.tables t
        INNER JOIN ' + @Server1 + @DB1 + '.sys.schemas s ON s.schema_id = t.schema_id
        INNER JOIN ' + @Server1 + @DB1 + '.sys.columns c ON c.object_id = t.object_id
        INNER JOIN ' + @Server1 + @DB1 + '.sys.types tp ON tp.system_type_id = c.system_type_id
        LEFT OUTER JOIN ' + @Server1 + @DB1 + '.sys.identity_columns ic ON ic.object_id = t.object_id AND ic.name = c.name
        LEFT OUTER JOIN ' + @Server1 + @DB1 + '.sys.default_constraints dc ON dc.object_id = c.default_object_id
    ) s1
FULL OUTER JOIN (
    SELECT
        ''' + @DB2 + ''' AS [Database],
        s.name AS [Schema],
        t.name AS [Table],
        c.name AS [Column],
        tp.name AS [Type],
        CASE 
            WHEN tp.collation_name IS NOT NULL
                THEN 1
            ELSE 0
        END AS IsCharType,
        CASE
            WHEN c.max_length = -1
                THEN ''MAX''
            ELSE CAST(c.max_length AS VARCHAR(4))
        END AS [Length],
        c.[precision],
        c.scale,
        c.is_nullable AS IsNullable,
        c.is_identity AS IsIdentity,
        CAST(ISNULL(ic.seed_value, 0) AS INT) AS IdentitySeed,
        CAST(ISNULL(ic.increment_value, 0) AS INT) AS IdentityIncrement,
        dc.definition AS DefaultValue,
        c.column_id AS [Order]
    FROM ' + @Server2 + @DB2 + '.sys.tables t
        INNER JOIN ' + @Server2 + @DB2 + '.sys.schemas s ON s.schema_id = t.schema_id
        INNER JOIN ' + @Server2 + @DB2 + '.sys.columns c ON c.object_id = t.object_id
        INNER JOIN ' + @Server2 + @DB2 + '.sys.types tp ON tp.system_type_id = c.system_type_id
        LEFT OUTER JOIN ' + @Server2 + @DB2 + '.sys.identity_columns ic ON ic.object_id = t.object_id AND ic.name = c.name
        LEFT OUTER JOIN ' + @Server2 + @DB2 + '.sys.default_constraints dc ON dc.object_id = c.default_object_id
    ) s2
    ON s2.[Schema] = s1.[Schema]
    AND s2.[Table] = s1.[Table]
    AND s2.[Column] = s1.[Column]   
ORDER BY
    CASE WHEN s1.[Database] IS NULL THEN s2.[Database] ELSE s1.[Database] END,
    CASE WHEN s1.[Schema] IS NULL THEN s2.[Schema] ELSE s1.[Schema] END,
    CASE WHEN s1.[Table] IS NULL THEN s2.[Table] ELSE s1.[Table] END,
    CASE WHEN s1.[Order] IS NULL THEN s2.[Order] ELSE s1.[Order] END
'

EXEC sp_executesql @SQL
1

If two tables in same database, you can use this query

select c2.table_name,c2.COLUMN_NAME
from [INFORMATION_SCHEMA].[COLUMNS] c2
where table_name='table1'
and c2.COLUMN_NAME not in (select column_name 
    from [INFORMATION_SCHEMA].[COLUMNS] 
    where table_name='table1')
0

You can use the SQL Management studio tools to "Generate scripts" from both databases. Then use your favorite text comparison tool to see any differences.

In the old days, this worked great, but in SQL 2005 the generate script code changed and the objects were no longer created in the same order, so the text comparison is less useful. I have not tested this in more recent versions of SQL so it may have been fixed. You can also try http://exportsqlscript.codeplex.com/ which I have used with good success to output the DDL as scripts for source code control and comparing versions.

References:

  • And of course, my favorite text comparison tool is Beyond Compare from scootersoftware.com – Michael Levy Oct 18 '10 at 19:08
  • 1
    I tried that exact thing (generating the scripts, and I even used beyond compare). Unfortunately, as your post states, it was a fail due to the ordering... – sooprise Oct 18 '10 at 21:05
  • exportsqlscript.codeplex.com does fix this problem. And, as I reported this as a bug to Microsoft and in the log someone said "it is fixed in the next release". I never saw the fix from Microsoft. – Michael Levy Oct 20 '10 at 13:44

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