32

Given an arbitrary number, how can I process each digit of the number individually?

Edit I've added a basic example of the kind of thing Foo might do.

For example, in C# I might do something like this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int number = 1234567890;
    string numberAsString = number.ToString();

    foreach(char x in numberAsString)
    {
        string y = x.ToString();
        int z = int.Parse(y);
        Foo(z);
    }
}

void Foo(int n)
{
    Console.WriteLine(n*n);
}

16 Answers 16

85

Have you heard of div and mod?

You'll probably want to reverse the list of numbers if you want to treat the most significant digit first. Converting the number into a string is an impaired way of doing things.

135 `div` 10 = 13
135 `mod` 10 = 5

Generalize into a function:

digs :: Integral x => x -> [x]
digs 0 = []
digs x = digs (x `div` 10) ++ [x `mod` 10]

Or in reverse:

digs :: Integral x => x -> [x]
digs 0 = []
digs x = x `mod` 10 : digs (x `div` 10)

This treats 0 as having no digits. A simple wrapper function can deal with that special case if you want to.

Note that this solution does not work for negative numbers (the input x must be integral, i.e. a whole number).

  • 3
    quotRem. – kennytm Oct 18 '10 at 21:02
  • I've added an example to my code as I don't see how div and mod will help me walk over the digits of any arbitrary number. Could you expand on your thoughts please. – Greg B Oct 18 '10 at 21:05
  • @Greg B this is a haskell source code that does the exact same thing your algorithm does, but using @supercooldave algorithm => pastie.org/1231091 – Roman Gonzalez Oct 18 '10 at 21:37
  • so that digs 001 will be [0,0,1] – MySchizoBuddy Nov 24 '14 at 21:03
  • digs 001 = digs 1 = [1] because 001 = 1. – Dave Clarke Nov 24 '14 at 21:22
20
digits :: Integer -> [Int]
digits = map (read . (:[])) . show

or you can return it into []:

digits :: Integer -> [Int]
digits = map (read . return) . show

or, with Data.Char.digitToInt:

digits :: Integer -> [Int]
digits = map digitToInt . show

the same as Daniel's really, but point free and uses Int, because a digit shouldn't really exceed maxBound :: Int.

  • 2
    the digitToInt version is probably better anyway, and :[] was slightly more obvious to me. eh, I'll edit it in. I have no idea where pure is from, so. – muhmuhten Oct 19 '10 at 22:00
  • reread this, this time recognizing pure and yes, that would be equivalent. (it is required to be equivalent.) – muhmuhten Aug 18 '14 at 0:27
  • can you explain what the "period" does between read and return – MySchizoBuddy Nov 22 '14 at 16:28
  • function composition. (.) :: (b -> c) -> (a -> b) -> a -> c – muhmuhten Nov 23 '14 at 0:37
  • I like how this solution uses map versus pattern matching, such idiom! – dopamane Aug 25 '18 at 19:54
13

You could also just reuse digits from Hackage.

12

Using the same technique used in your post, you can do:

digits :: Integer -> [Int]
digits n = map (\x -> read [x] :: Int) (show n)

See it in action:

Prelude> digits 123
[1,2,3]

Does that help?

  • digits 0123 should be [0,1,2,3] – MySchizoBuddy Nov 24 '14 at 21:06
12

Textbook unfold

import qualified Data.List as L
digits = reverse . L.unfoldr (\x -> if x == 0 then Nothing else Just (mod x 10, div x 10))
  • Obviously this is the way to do. If you include import Data.Bool.bool then you can make it even more sexy like unfoldr (\x -> bool Nothing (Just (rem x 10, div x 10)) (x > 0)) – Redu Oct 12 '17 at 15:34
  • Variant that works with negative numbers: digits d = reverse . unfoldr (\x -> bool (Just $ swap $ divMod x 10) Nothing (x == 0)) $ abs d. Needed imports: Data.List (unfoldr), Data.Tuple (swap), Data.Bool (bool) – Matthias Braun Mar 13 '18 at 20:04
  • 1
    Perfect solution, except that it is probably best to use divMod, if we are not sure whether the compiler will optimize the common work between div and mod all by itself. – jpmarinier May 25 '19 at 11:15
10

You can use

digits = map (`mod` 10) . reverse . takeWhile (> 0) . iterate (`div` 10)

or for reverse order

rev_digits = map (`mod` 10) . takeWhile (> 0) . iterate (`div` 10)

The iterate part generates an infinite list dividing the argument in every step by 10, so 12345 becomes [12345,1234,123,12,1,0,0..]. The takeWhile part takes only the interesting non-null part of the list. Then we reverse (if we want to) and take the last digit of each number of the list.

I used point-free style here, so you can imagine an invisible argument n on both sides of the "equation". However, if you want to write it that way, you have to substitute the top level . by $:

digits n = map(`mod` 10) $ reverse $ takeWhile (> 0) $ iterate (`div`10) n
3

Via list comprehension:

import Data.Char

digits :: Integer -> [Integer]
digits n = [toInteger (digitToInt x) | x <- show n]

output:

> digits 1234567890
[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0]
2

Here's an improvement on an answer above. This avoids the extra 0 at the beginning ( Examples: [0,1,0] for 10, [0,1] for 1 ). Use pattern matching to handle cases where x < 10 differently:

toDigits :: Integer -> [Integer] -- 12 -> [1,2], 0 -> [0], 10 -> [1,0]
toDigits x
    | x < 10 = [x]
    | otherwise = toDigits (div x 10) ++ [mod x 10]

I would have put this in a reply to that answer, but I don't have the needed reputation points :(

2

Applicative. Pointfree. Origami. Neat.

Enjoy:

import Data.List                                                                
import Data.Tuple                                                               
import Data.Bool                                                                
import Control.Applicative 

digits = unfoldr $ liftA2 (bool Nothing) (Just . swap . (`divMod` 10)) (> 0) 
1

For returning a list of [Integer]

import Data.Char
toDigits :: Integer -> [Integer]
toDigits n = map (\x -> toInteger (digitToInt x)) (show n)
  • 1
    Or in point free style it would be: toDigits = map (toInteger . digitToInt) . show – kibin Aug 16 '15 at 17:20
1

The accepted answer is great but fails in cases of negative numbers since mod (-1) 10 evaluates to 9. If you would like this to handle negative numbers properly... which may not be the case the following code will allow for it.

digs :: Int -> [Int]
digs 0 = []
digs x
  | x < 0 = digs ((-1) * x)
  | x > 0 = digs (div x 10) ++ [mod x 10]
  • Could you refactor that with an abs? – Raman Shah Jun 13 '17 at 12:51
1

I was lazy to write my custom function so I googled it and tbh I was surprised that none of the answers on this website provided a really good solution – high performance and type safe. So here it is, maybe somebody would like to use it. Basically:

  1. It is type safe - it returns a type checked non-empty list of Word8 digits (all the above solutions return a list of numbers, but it cannot happen that we get [] right?)
  2. This one is performance optimized with tail call optimization, fast concatenation and no need to do any reversing of the final values.
  3. It uses special assignment syntax which in connection to -XStrict allows Haskell to fully do strictness analysis and optimize the inner loop.

Enjoy:

{-# LANGUAGE Strict #-}

digits :: Integral a => a -> NonEmpty Word8
digits = go [] where
    go s x = loop (head :| s) tail where
        head = fromIntegral (x `mod` 10)
        tail = x `div` 10
    loop s@(r :| rs) = \case
        0 -> s
        x -> go (r : rs) x
1

I've been following next steps(based on this comment):

  1. Convert the integer to a string.
  2. Iterate over the string character-by-character.
  3. Convert each character back to an integer, while appending it to the end of a list.

toDigits :: Integer -> [Integer]
toDigits a = [(read([m])::Integer) | m<-show(a)]

main = print(toDigits(1234))
  • 2
    Please don't post only code as an answer, but also include an explanation what your code does and how it solves the problem of the question. Answers with an explanation are generally of higher quality, and are more likely to attract upvotes. – Mark Rotteveel Oct 27 '19 at 6:42
0

The accepted answer is correct except that it will output an empty list when input is 0, however I believe the output should be [0] when input is zero.

And I don't think it deal with the case when the input is negative. Below is my implementation, which solves the above two problems.

toDigits :: Integer -> [Integer]
toDigits n
 | n >=0 && n < 10 = [n]
 | n >= 10 = toDigits (n`div`10) ++ [n`mod`10]
 | otherwise = error "make sure your input is greater than 0" 
-2
digits = reverse . unfoldr go
  where go = uncurry (*>) . (&&&) (guard . (>0)) (Just . swap . (`quotRem` 10))
  • 1
    This answer would be much improved with an explanation – Sam P May 1 '16 at 19:43
  • quotRem splits of the last digit basically and returns a tuple of the digit and the rest. – Blank Chisui Nov 2 '17 at 15:28
-2

I tried to keep using tail recursion

toDigits :: Integer -> [Integer]
toDigits x = reverse $ toDigitsRev x

toDigitsRev :: Integer -> [Integer]
toDigitsRev x
    | x <= 0 = []
    | otherwise = x `rem` 10 : toDigitsRev (x `quot` 10)
  • 3
    This isn't tail recursion - there's a cons operation in the last branch other than the recursive call. – Tamoghna Chowdhury Jun 27 '17 at 18:04
  • This isn't tail recursion - there's a cons operation in the last branch other than the recursive call. – Tamoghna Chowdhury Jun 27 '17 at 18:04

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