42

Suppose I have an NxN matrix A, an index vector V consisting of a subset of the numbers 1:N, and a value K, and I want to do this:

 for i = V
     A(i,i) = K
 end

Is there a way to do this in one statement w/ vectorization?

e.g. A(something) = K

The statement A(V,V) = K will not work, it assigns off-diagonal elements, and this is not what I want. e.g.:

>> A = zeros(5);
>> V = [1 3 4];
>> A(V,V) = 1

A =

 1     0     1     1     0
 0     0     0     0     0
 1     0     1     1     0
 1     0     1     1     0
 0     0     0     0     0
  • Jason: Note that we don't need to add "MATLAB" to the question title as it is already specified in the tags. SO guidelines discourage duplicating information in the title and the tags. – Cris Luengo May 25 '18 at 4:22
61

I usually use EYE for that:

A = magic(4)
A(logical(eye(size(A)))) = 99

A =
    99     2     3    13
     5    99    10     8
     9     7    99    12
     4    14    15    99

Alternatively, you can just create the list of linear indices, since from one diagonal element to the next, it takes nRows+1 steps:

[nRows,nCols] = size(A);
A(1:(nRows+1):nRows*nCols) = 101
A =
   101     2     3    13
     5   101    10     8
     9     7   101    12
     4    14    15   101

If you only want to access a subset of diagonal elements, you need to create a list of diagonal indices:

subsetIdx = [1 3];
diagonalIdx = (subsetIdx-1) * (nRows + 1) + 1;
A(diagonalIdx) = 203
A =
   203     2     3    13
     5   101    10     8
     9     7   203    12
     4    14    15   101

Alternatively, you can create a logical index array using diag (works only for square arrays)

diagonalIdx = false(nRows,1);
diagonalIdx(subsetIdx) = true;
A(diag(diagonalIdx)) = -1
A =
    -1     2     3    13
     5   101    10     8
     9     7    -1    12
     4    14    15   101
  • @Jason S: Thanks! I actually find this an annoying issue; I often attempt to use diag first, before I remember to use eye – Jonas Oct 18 '10 at 21:37
  • for the second last examples, I suggest to use matlab's sub2ind function to find the absolute indices. In my opinion, this is the most straight-forward (and most readable) approach and could replace your last two suggestions. – tc88 Dec 9 '16 at 10:48
  • @tc88: you're right in that row/column indices are more intuitive. However, an assignment A(rowIdx, colIdx) = -1 assigns the value to all combinations of rowIdx/colIdx. Thus, if you want to assign multiple elements of an array in one go, linear indices are the way to go. – Jonas Dec 12 '16 at 7:19
  • @Jonas: I agree. That is why I suggested to use matlab's sub2ind which returns you the linear index for given rowIdx/colIdx – tc88 Dec 12 '16 at 19:31
  • @tc88: Ah, now I understand what you mean with "absolute indices". Yes, sub2ind would indeed make sense that way. – Jonas Dec 12 '16 at 20:59
23
>> tt = zeros(5,5)
tt =
     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0
>> tt(1:6:end) = 3
tt =
     3     0     0     0     0
     0     3     0     0     0
     0     0     3     0     0
     0     0     0     3     0
     0     0     0     0     3

and more general:

>> V=[1 2 5]; N=5;
>> tt = zeros(N,N);
>> tt((N+1)*(V-1)+1) = 3
tt =
     3     0     0     0     0
     0     3     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     3

This is based on the fact that matrices can be accessed as one-dimensional arrays (vectors), where the 2 indices (m,n) are replaced by a linear mapping m*N+n.

  • I only saw your solution after I had submitted my edit. +1 for being faster, even though my solution is a bit more general :) – Jonas Oct 18 '10 at 21:36
  • 1
    I really like the tt(1:n+1:end) method, really clean! – Erika Dec 23 '14 at 8:04
  • this should be the top solution, IMHO probably the fastest?! – user2305193 Feb 21 '19 at 12:12
2
A = zeros(7,6);
V = [1 3 5];

[n m] = size(A);
diagIdx = 1:n+1:n*m;
A( diagIdx(V) ) = 1

A =
     1     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     1     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     1     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0
2

I'd use sub2ind and pass the diagonal indices as both x and y parameters:

A = zeros(4)
V=[2 4]

idx = sub2ind(size(A), V,V)
% idx = [6, 16]

A(idx) = 1

% A =
% 0     0     0     0
% 0     1     0     0
% 0     0     0     0
% 0     0     0     1
2

Suppose K is the value. The command

A=A-diag(K-diag(A))

may be a bit faster

>> A=randn(10000,10000);

>> tic;A(logical(eye(size(A))))=12;toc

Elapsed time is 0.517575 seconds.

>> tic;A=A+diag((99-diag(A)));toc

Elapsed time is 0.353408 seconds.

But it consumes more memory.

  • I used A(logical(eye(size(A))))=K flexible fast and reliable – Vass Mar 15 '13 at 11:59
2
>> B=[0,4,4;4,0,4;4,4,0]

B =

     0     4     4
     4     0     4
     4     4     0

>> v=[1,2,3]

v =

     1     2     3

>> B(eye(size(B))==1)=v
%insert values from v to eye positions in B

B =

     1     4     4
     4     2     4
     4     4     3

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