300

I would like to see test results ( system.out/err, log messages from components being tested ) as they run in the same console I run:

gradle test

And not wait until tests are done to look at the test reports ( that are only generated when tests are completed, so I can't "tail -f" anything while tests are running )

1

19 Answers 19

224

Here is my fancy version:

fancy test result

import org.gradle.api.tasks.testing.logging.TestExceptionFormat
import org.gradle.api.tasks.testing.logging.TestLogEvent

tasks.withType(Test) {
    testLogging {
        // set options for log level LIFECYCLE
        events TestLogEvent.FAILED,
               TestLogEvent.PASSED,
               TestLogEvent.SKIPPED,
               TestLogEvent.STANDARD_OUT
        exceptionFormat TestExceptionFormat.FULL
        showExceptions true
        showCauses true
        showStackTraces true

        // set options for log level DEBUG and INFO
        debug {
            events TestLogEvent.STARTED,
                   TestLogEvent.FAILED,
                   TestLogEvent.PASSED,
                   TestLogEvent.SKIPPED,
                   TestLogEvent.STANDARD_ERROR,
                   TestLogEvent.STANDARD_OUT
            exceptionFormat TestExceptionFormat.FULL
        }
        info.events = debug.events
        info.exceptionFormat = debug.exceptionFormat

        afterSuite { desc, result ->
            if (!desc.parent) { // will match the outermost suite
                def output = "Results: ${result.resultType} (${result.testCount} tests, ${result.successfulTestCount} passed, ${result.failedTestCount} failed, ${result.skippedTestCount} skipped)"
                def startItem = '|  ', endItem = '  |'
                def repeatLength = startItem.length() + output.length() + endItem.length()
                println('\n' + ('-' * repeatLength) + '\n' + startItem + output + endItem + '\n' + ('-' * repeatLength))
            }
        }
    }
}
12
  • 15
    In my opinion, this is the best answer here. It contains the biggest set of options and everyone can configure their tests as they need.
    – Slav
    Oct 9, 2016 at 10:40
  • 4
    @sealskej where do I need to copy this code into and how to run it from the command line? EDIT: got it - just add it to the modules's gradle.config and run normally
    – hardysim
    Nov 26, 2016 at 19:38
  • 1
    And how did you enable the colors? Feb 20, 2017 at 11:32
  • 1
    @DurgaSwaroop Works out of the box for me. Please make sure that your terminal application supports colors. I personally use iTerm2 app. Feb 20, 2017 at 15:42
  • 1
    Works like a charm with Gradle 4.5
    – Peter
    Jan 25, 2018 at 13:55
216

You could run Gradle with INFO logging level on the command line. It'll show you the result of each test while they are running. Downside is that you will get far more output for other tasks also.

gradle test -i
6
  • 16
    With 1.0-milestone 6 the Gradle DSL now let's you configure that directly using testLogging.showStandardStreams = true within the test closure. Nov 23, 2011 at 12:32
  • 4
    This doesn't work in gradle 1.11. I get a lot of debug output, but not the individual test results. Apr 24, 2014 at 23:12
  • 69
    That -i will throw a bunch of irrelevant infos on the terminal.
    – Thuy Trinh
    Dec 11, 2015 at 13:53
  • 13
    In addition to a lot of useless output, nothing is displayed for a tests that pass and generate no output.
    – toolbear
    Oct 8, 2016 at 0:37
  • 1
    You can use grep to filter out the thousands of unwanted lines. See stackoverflow.com/questions/3963708/…
    – Mr-IDE
    Oct 20, 2018 at 18:45
186

Disclaimer: I am the developer of the Gradle Test Logger Plugin.

You can simply use the Gradle Test Logger Plugin to print beautiful logs on the console. The plugin uses sensible defaults to satisfy most users with little or no configuration but also offers a number of themes and configuration options to suit everyone.

Examples

Standard Theme Standard theme

Mocha Theme Mocha theme

Usage

plugins {
    id 'com.adarshr.test-logger' version '<version>'
}

Make sure you always get the latest version from Gradle Central.

Configuration

You don't need any configuration at all. However, the plugin offers a few options. This can be done as follows (default values shown):

testlogger {
    // pick a theme - mocha, standard, plain, mocha-parallel, standard-parallel or plain-parallel
    theme 'standard'

    // set to false to disable detailed failure logs
    showExceptions true

    // set to false to hide stack traces
    showStackTraces true

    // set to true to remove any filtering applied to stack traces
    showFullStackTraces false

    // set to false to hide exception causes
    showCauses true

    // set threshold in milliseconds to highlight slow tests
    slowThreshold 2000

    // displays a breakdown of passes, failures and skips along with total duration
    showSummary true

    // set to true to see simple class names
    showSimpleNames false

    // set to false to hide passed tests
    showPassed true

    // set to false to hide skipped tests
    showSkipped true

    // set to false to hide failed tests
    showFailed true

    // enable to see standard out and error streams inline with the test results
    showStandardStreams false

    // set to false to hide passed standard out and error streams
    showPassedStandardStreams true

    // set to false to hide skipped standard out and error streams
    showSkippedStandardStreams true

    // set to false to hide failed standard out and error streams
    showFailedStandardStreams true
}

I hope you will enjoy using it.

14
  • 4
    Nice! Amazing something as simple as a summary of passed/failed/skipped tests led to it.
    – MarkHu
    Feb 28, 2018 at 1:47
  • 1
    I just integrated the plugin, but I'm not seeing the duration tests take, like in your git for every test in parenthesis (1.6s) How to enable that?
    – dk7
    Nov 19, 2018 at 11:15
  • 1
    @dk7 by default only tests that take longer than 1 second to run will have the duration printed. See the documentation for more info. If you want to see all durations, simply set slowThreshold to 0.
    – adarshr
    Nov 19, 2018 at 15:39
  • 1
    @HaroldL.Brown Yes indeed :) I'm just a bit swamped with a few things currently but it's very much alive.
    – adarshr
    Apr 6, 2020 at 10:55
  • 1
    Yup @VadymTyemirov. Same as github.com/radarsh/gradle-test-logger-plugin/issues/137 once I document it 🙂
    – adarshr
    Apr 6, 2020 at 19:51
171

You can add a Groovy closure inside your build.gradle file that does the logging for you:

test {
    afterTest { desc, result -> 
        logger.quiet "Executing test ${desc.name} [${desc.className}] with result: ${result.resultType}"
    }
}

On your console it then reads like this:

:compileJava UP-TO-DATE
:compileGroovy
:processResources
:classes
:jar
:assemble
:compileTestJava
:compileTestGroovy
:processTestResources
:testClasses
:test
Executing test maturesShouldBeCharged11DollarsForDefaultMovie [movietickets.MovieTicketsTests] with result: SUCCESS
Executing test studentsShouldBeCharged8DollarsForDefaultMovie [movietickets.MovieTicketsTests] with result: SUCCESS
Executing test seniorsShouldBeCharged6DollarsForDefaultMovie [movietickets.MovieTicketsTests] with result: SUCCESS
Executing test childrenShouldBeCharged5DollarsAnd50CentForDefaultMovie [movietickets.MovieTicketsTests] with result: SUCCESS
:check
:build

Since version 1.1 Gradle supports much more options to log test output. With those options at hand you can achieve a similar output with the following configuration:

test {
    testLogging {
        events "passed", "skipped", "failed"
    }
}
3
  • 4
    this will only produce the output after test is executed. what I am looking for is to see the logging / reporting / system outs / printlns etc.. as tests are running. think about executing tests with maven or just in IntelliJ / Eclipse: the output is produced in real time.
    – tolitius
    Nov 28, 2010 at 5:12
  • Okay, sorry for misunderstanding your question. For that case you should have a look at the following part of the Gradle documentation: gradle.org/logging.html#sec:external_tools Nov 28, 2010 at 17:53
  • 1
    So what change do I actually make to see the output? I see all these custom listeners and stuff in the documentation, but I have no idea how to configure this.
    – jpswain
    Feb 24, 2011 at 4:58
145

As stefanglase answered:

adding the following code to your build.gradle (since version 1.1) works fine for output on passed, skipped and failed tests.

test {
    testLogging {
        events "passed", "skipped", "failed", "standardOut", "standardError"
    }
}

What I want to say additionally (I found out this is a problem for starters) is that the gradle test command executes the test only one time per change.

So if you are running it the second time there will be no output on test results. You can also see this in the building output: gradle then says UP-TO-DATE on tests. So its not executed a n-th time.

Smart gradle!

If you want to force the test cases to run, use gradle cleanTest test.

This is slightly off topic but I hope it will help some newbies.

edit

As sparc_spread stated in the comments:

If you want to force gradle to always run fresh tests (which might not always be a good idea) you can add outputs.upToDateWhen {false} to testLogging { [...] }. Continue reading here.

Peace.

6
  • 11
    Hey, just wanted to let you know I found a way to not have to say gradle cleanTest test each time (as of Gradle 1.12). Add outputs.upToDateWhen {false} to testLogging {...} and that should do the trick. It will force Gradle to run the tests every time. I found this in the Gradle forums, posted by Dockter himself. Hope this helps. May 15, 2014 at 19:37
  • I'd include exceptionFormat "full" to get details about what failed, useful when you're using AssertJ or similar lib. Nov 27, 2015 at 18:21
  • 5
    Instead of cleanTest you may use test --rerun-tasks
    – gavenkoa
    Mar 25, 2017 at 21:10
  • 2
    @gavenkoa I think --rerun-tasks will make all your tasks rerun, not just the tasks for the tests.
    – ThomasW
    Mar 29, 2017 at 3:00
  • 2
    actually, cleanTest test on latest Android Studio and gradle 3.3 is not working on my side, but --rerun-tasks did the trick. Don't know why. But reading this answer really solved my headache, where's the f**king test logging after I add every thing.
    – Wingzero
    Jun 13, 2017 at 7:33
63

Add this to build.gradle to stop gradle from swallowing stdout and stderr.

test {
    testLogging.showStandardStreams = true
}

It's documented here.

1
  • 1
    👍 For any Kotlin people, that's val test by tasks.getting(Test::class) { testLogging.showStandardStreams = true }—I think.
    – Brad Turek
    Aug 25, 2021 at 22:53
45

'test' task does not work for Android plugin, for Android plugin use the following:

// Test Logging
tasks.withType(Test) {
    testLogging {
        events "started", "passed", "skipped", "failed"
    }
}

See the following: https://stackoverflow.com/a/31665341/3521637

1
  • 4
    Awesome. FYI Future me - save your two minutes by not placing it inside android{} block Nov 10, 2015 at 6:12
21

As a follow up to Shubham's great answer I like to suggest using enum values instead of strings. Please take a look at the documentation of the TestLogging class.

import org.gradle.api.tasks.testing.logging.TestExceptionFormat
import org.gradle.api.tasks.testing.logging.TestLogEvent

tasks.withType(Test) {
    testLogging {
        events TestLogEvent.FAILED,
               TestLogEvent.PASSED,
               TestLogEvent.SKIPPED,
               TestLogEvent.STANDARD_ERROR,
               TestLogEvent.STANDARD_OUT
        exceptionFormat TestExceptionFormat.FULL
        showCauses true
        showExceptions true
        showStackTraces true
    }
}
18

My favourite minimalistic version based on Shubham Chaudhary answer. enter image description here

Put this in build.gradle file:

test {
    afterSuite { desc, result ->
    if (!desc.parent)
        println("${result.resultType} " +
            "(${result.testCount} tests, " +
            "${result.successfulTestCount} successes, " +
            "${result.failedTestCount} failures, " +
            "${result.skippedTestCount} skipped)")
    }
}
7

In Gradle using Android plugin:

gradle.projectsEvaluated {
    tasks.withType(Test) { task ->
        task.afterTest { desc, result ->
            println "Executing test ${desc.name} [${desc.className}] with result: ${result.resultType}"
        }
    }
}

Then the output will be:

Executing test testConversionMinutes [org.example.app.test.DurationTest] with result: SUCCESS

5

If you have a build.gradle.kts written in Kotlin DSL you can print test results with (I was developing a kotlin multi-platform project, with no "java" plugin applied):

tasks.withType<AbstractTestTask> {
    afterSuite(KotlinClosure2({ desc: TestDescriptor, result: TestResult ->
        if (desc.parent == null) { // will match the outermost suite
            println("Results: ${result.resultType} (${result.testCount} tests, ${result.successfulTestCount} successes, ${result.failedTestCount} failures, ${result.skippedTestCount} skipped)")
        }
    }))
}
2
  • Did you invoke this task via the command line with something like ./gradlew test? I tried this out but didn't see any output when invoking via the command line.
    – Jesse Hill
    Jul 6, 2021 at 19:21
  • 1
    Yes, I was invoking this task with command line. This was working with the version of gradle at time of writing of my answer... Now that project is no more under my control, I don't know what the mantainers have done. I'm sorry.
    – Enrico
    Jul 7, 2021 at 17:42
4

Just add the following closure to your build.gradle. the output will be printed after the execution of every test.

test{
    useJUnitPlatform()
    afterTest { desc, result ->
        def output = "Class name: ${desc.className}, Test name: ${desc.name},  (Test status: ${result.resultType})"
        println( '\n' + output)
    }
}
1
  • Could not find method test() for arguments ... Where do you place this closure? And which build.gradle file?
    – MiStr
    Jul 23, 2020 at 20:23
3

Merge of Shubham's great answer and JJD use enum instead of string

tasks.withType(Test) {
   testLogging {
       // set options for log level LIFECYCLE
       events TestLogEvent.PASSED,
            TestLogEvent.SKIPPED, TestLogEvent.FAILED, TestLogEvent.STANDARD_OUT
       showExceptions true
       exceptionFormat TestExceptionFormat.FULL
       showCauses true
       showStackTraces true

    // set options for log level DEBUG and INFO
       debug {
        events TestLogEvent.STARTED, TestLogEvent.PASSED, TestLogEvent.SKIPPED, TestLogEvent.FAILED, TestLogEvent.STANDARD_OUT, TestLogEvent.STANDARD_ERROR
        exceptionFormat TestExceptionFormat.FULL
       }
       info.events = debug.events
       info.exceptionFormat = debug.exceptionFormat

       afterSuite { desc, result ->
           if (!desc.parent) { // will match the outermost suite
               def output = "Results: ${result.resultType} (${result.testCount} tests, ${result.successfulTestCount} successes, ${result.failedTestCount} failures, ${result.skippedTestCount} skipped)"
               def startItem = '|  ', endItem = '  |'
               def repeatLength = startItem.length() + output.length() + endItem.length()
               println('\n' + ('-' * repeatLength) + '\n' + startItem + output + endItem + '\n' + ('-' * repeatLength))
           }
       }
   }
}
1
  • 2
    I request you to please add some more context around your answer. Code-only or link-only answers are difficult to understand. It will help the asker and future readers both if you can add more information in your post.
    – RBT
    Jan 4, 2017 at 6:32
3

For Android, this works nicely:

android {
...

testOptions {
    unitTests.all {
        testLogging {
            outputs.upToDateWhen { false }
            events "passed", "failed", "skipped", "standardError"
            showCauses true
            showExceptions true
        }
    }
} 

}

See Running Android unit / instrumentation tests from the console

2

Following on from Benjamin Muschko's answer (19 March 2011), you can use the -i flag along with grep, to filter out 1000s of unwanted lines. Examples:

Strong filter - Only display each unit test name and test result and the overall build status. Setup errors or exceptions are not displayed.

./gradlew test -i | grep -E " > |BUILD"

Soft filter - Display each unit test name and test result, as well as setup errors/exceptions. But it will also include some irrelevant info:

./gradlew test -i | grep -E -v "^Executing |^Creating |^Parsing |^Using |^Merging |^Download |^title=Compiling|^AAPT|^future=|^task=|:app:|V/InstrumentationResultParser:"

Soft filter, Alternative syntax: (search tokens are split into individual strings)

./gradlew test -i | grep -v -e "^Executing " -e "^Creating " -e "^Parsing " -e "^Using " -e "^Merging " -e "^Download " -e "^title=Compiling" -e "^AAPT" -e "^future=" -e "^task=" -e ":app:" -e "V/InstrumentationResultParser:"

Explanation of how it works:

The first command is ./gradlew test -i and "-i" means "Info/Verbose" mode, which prints the result of each test in real-time, but also displays large amounts of unwanted debug lines.

So the output of the first command, ./gradlew test -i, is piped to a second command grep, which will filter out many unwanted lines, based on a regular expression. "-E" enables the regular expression mode for a single string; "-e" enables regular expressions for multiple strings; and "|" in the regex string means "or".

In the strong filter, a unit test name and test result is allowed to display using " > ", and the overall status is allowed with "BUILD".

In the soft filter, the "-v" flag means "not containing" and "^" means "start of line". So it strips out all lines that start with "Executing " or start with "Creating ", etc.


Example for Android instrumentation unit tests, with gradle 5.1:

./gradlew connectedDebugAndroidTest --continue -i | grep -v -e \
    "^Transforming " -e "^Skipping " -e "^Cache " -e "^Performance " -e "^Creating " -e \
    "^Parsing " -e "^file " -e "ddms: " -e ":app:" -e "V/InstrumentationResultParser:"

Example for Jacoco unit test coverage, with gradle 4.10:

./gradlew createDebugCoverageReport --continue -i | grep -E -v "^Executing |^Creating |^Parsing |^Using |^Merging |^Download |^title=Compiling|^AAPT|^future=|^task=|:app:|V/InstrumentationResultParser:"
1
  • Here another suggest, if you are only interested in test results: ...grep -e "^.*\..*\..*>.*\[.*\].*" for output of 'com.your.package.. > test_check_correct[AVD_NAME] SUCCESS' only. (or ...grep -e "^.*\..*\..*>.*\[.*\].*\|^> Task :.*" to include also > Task :app:mergeDexMinApi14Debug lines)
    – allofmex
    Nov 1, 2020 at 19:01
1

For those using Kotlin DSL, you can do:

tasks {
  named<Test>("test") {
    testLogging.showStandardStreams = true
  }
}
1

If you are using jupiter and none of the answers work, consider verifying it is setup correctly:

test {
    useJUnitPlatform()
    outputs.upToDateWhen { false }
}

dependencies {
    testImplementation 'org.junit.jupiter:junit-jupiter-api:5.7.0'
    testRuntimeOnly 'org.junit.jupiter:junit-jupiter-engine:5.7.0'
}

And then try the accepted answers

1

I've written a test logger for Kotlin DSL. You can put this block on your project scope build.gradle.kts file.

subprojects {
    tasks.withType(Test::class.java) {
        testLogging {
            showCauses = false
            showExceptions = false
            showStackTraces = false
            showStandardStreams = false

            val ansiReset = "\u001B[0m"
            val ansiGreen = "\u001B[32m"
            val ansiRed = "\u001B[31m"
            val ansiYellow = "\u001B[33m"

            fun getColoredResultType(resultType: ResultType): String {
                return when (resultType) {
                    ResultType.SUCCESS -> "$ansiGreen $resultType $ansiReset"
                    ResultType.FAILURE -> "$ansiRed $resultType $ansiReset"
                    ResultType.SKIPPED -> "$ansiYellow $resultType $ansiReset"
                }
            }

            afterTest(
                KotlinClosure2({ desc: TestDescriptor, result: TestResult ->
                    println("${desc.className} | ${desc.displayName} = ${getColoredResultType(result.resultType)}")
                })
            )

            afterSuite(
                KotlinClosure2({ desc: TestDescriptor, result: TestResult ->
                    if (desc.parent == null) {
                        println("Result: ${result.resultType} (${result.testCount} tests, ${result.successfulTestCount} passed, ${result.failedTestCount} failed, ${result.skippedTestCount} skipped)")
                    }
                })
            )
        }
    }
}

enter image description here

0

A more comprehensive response for those using th Kotlin DSL:

subprojects {
    // all the other stuff
    // ...
    tasks.named<Test>("test") {
        useJUnitPlatform()
        setupTestLogging()
    }
}

fun Test.setupTestLogging() {
    testLogging {
        events(
            org.gradle.api.tasks.testing.logging.TestLogEvent.FAILED,
            org.gradle.api.tasks.testing.logging.TestLogEvent.PASSED,
            org.gradle.api.tasks.testing.logging.TestLogEvent.SKIPPED,
            org.gradle.api.tasks.testing.logging.TestLogEvent.STANDARD_OUT,
        )
        exceptionFormat = org.gradle.api.tasks.testing.logging.TestExceptionFormat.FULL
        showExceptions = true
        showCauses = true
        showStackTraces = true

        addTestListener(object : TestListener {
            override fun beforeSuite(suite: TestDescriptor) {}
            override fun beforeTest(testDescriptor: TestDescriptor) {}
            override fun afterTest(testDescriptor: TestDescriptor, result: TestResult) {}
            override fun afterSuite(suite: TestDescriptor, result: TestResult) {
                if (suite.parent != null) { // will match the outermost suite
                    val output = "Results: ${result.resultType} (${result.testCount} tests, ${result.successfulTestCount} passed, ${result.failedTestCount} failed, ${result.skippedTestCount} skipped)"
                    val startItem = "|  "
                    val endItem = "  |"
                    val repeatLength = startItem.length + output.length + endItem.length
                    val messages = """
                        ${(1..repeatLength).joinToString("") { "-" }}
                        $startItem$output$endItem
                        ${(1..repeatLength).joinToString("") { "-" }}
                    """.trimIndent()
                    println(messages)
                }
            }
        })
    }
}

This should produce an output close to @odemolliens answers.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.